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Attorney General

NEWS
February 9, 1993
There is an old saying to the effect that if a cat jumps on a hot stove it will never do that again -- or jump on a cold one, either. President Clinton behaved like that last week when he refused to nominate his choice for attorney general, Judge Kimba Wood, because he found out she had once hired a domestic worker who was in the country illegally. Having been burned on the illegal alien issue before in the case of Zoe Baird, the president shied away -- even though the metaphorical stove in the Wood case was cold.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Out-of-state groups are pumping last-minute cash into the Maryland attorney general's race, fueling a barrage of campaign ads, including $240,000 in TV commercials purchased by a Florida-based fund that won't reveal its donors. The ads purchased by the Orlando-based Protecting Our Future Action Fund, which was formed Thursday, support Del. Jon S. Cardin of Baltimore County. State Sen. Brian E. Frosh of Montgomery County — considered Cardin's main opposition in Tuesday's Democratic primary — is also benefiting from outside spending.
NEWS
October 28, 1990
Edward L. Blanton, the Republican candidate running for attorney general against the Democratic incumbent, J. Joseph Curran Jr., is a competent, respected lawyer and public-spirited citizen who has raised several legitimate questions about Mr. Curran's record in four years in office.Mr. Blanton says the attorney general has not mobilized his office to deal with violent crime. He says Mr. Curran has not pursued environmental lawbreakers. He says Mr. Curran has deferred to his assistants instead of being a leader.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | February 12, 1993
"The Senate Judiciary Committee is now in session to hold a hearing on the confirmation of Ms. Yetta Nuther as attorney general of the United States. Welcome, Ms. Nuther, it is nice having you here.""You're welcome, Senator. It's terrifying being here.""Now, I just want you to be sure you understand the rules of this confirmation process. Have you read them?""Yes, Senator, I have.""All right. But for the benefit of those members of the TV viewing audience who are new to confirmation hearings, this is how it works.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
A Montgomery County Republican filed a lawsuit yesterday challenging the qualifications of Montgomery County Council member Thomas E. Perez to run for Maryland attorney general. Perez lacks the 10 years of Maryland legal experience required by the state constitution, despite an opinion to the contrary from Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., argued Stephen N. Abrams, a Montgomery school board member who is a candidate for state comptroller. Filed in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, the lawsuit comes two months before the Democratic primary in September.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Ronald Weich, an assistant U.S. attorney general and former aide to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, is to be named the next dean of the University of Baltimore School of Law on Wednesday, nine months after his popular predecessor resigned amid a public dispute with the university's president. Given his lengthy experience on Capitol Hill and his lack of time in academia, Weich, 52, is an unconventional choice to lead the law school. But faculty leaders, alumni and students said that's part of the reason they're excited about him after last year's tumult involving former dean Phillip Closius.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 9, 2009
When Barack Obama took office in January, the legal community braced itself for a politically motivated, mass firing of the nation's 93 federal prosecutors. But it never came. Instead, the new president asked the 50 or so U.S. Attorneys who hadn't already quit to stay put until successors could be found. In Maryland, that could take a while. Politicians on both sides of the political aisle are fans of incumbent U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein, a George W. Bush appointee, and they're in no hurry to usher him out. It's even possible that they could ask him to stay.
NEWS
By DENNIS M. SWEENEY | May 15, 2006
With the announcement of Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s retirement, Maryland voters will be hiring a new lawyer for the first time since 1988, giving us an opportunity to reflect on what the post has become and what it should be. The constitutional requirements are spare. To be elected, someone need only be a qualified voter who has resided and practiced law in Maryland for at least 10 years. In deciding whom to select from the candidates, voters should consider who can best preserve the distinguished heritage of this office while infusing it with renewed spirit and energy.
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