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NEWS
September 16, 2010
When the race for Baltimore County executive began, I thought I would vote for the winner in the Democratic primary between Joe Bartenfelder and Kevin Kamenetz because of their years of experience on the County Council. Then, according to the article "Kamenetz calls for unity in Balto. Co. " (Sept. 16), Kenneth Holt, the Republican Mr. Kamenetz will face in November, says he thought Mr. Kamenetz ran an "ugly campaign ... based on attack ads, false statements, a lot of information that was not honest.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 5, 2014
President Obama appears to have forgotten -- or ignored -- why we have elections. One reason is to stop, or slow down, an agenda the public doesn't like. When polls began reflecting buyer's remorse about Mr. Obama in 2010, voters elected a Republican majority in the House of Representatives and might well have done the same in the Senate in 2012 were it not for some weak GOP candidates, especially in Nevada and Delaware. President Obama acts as if elections other than his own don't matter.
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NEWS
March 30, 2010
If "relinquishing our freedom" will save lives, I'm all for it. Writer Chris Millirons can bleat all he wants about a right to drive while using handheld cell phones, he's out of step with reality ("Cell phone ban: how quickly we relinquish our freedom," Readers respond, March 30). Do I have a "right" to drive while drunk? It's been proven that talking on a cell phone is a similar impairment. People who cannot exist without being perpetually connected suffer a form of addiction.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Thirty-five state lawmakers on Thursday issued a statement condemning Del. Jon S. Cardin for missing nearly 75 percent of his committee votes this year.  "As members of the Maryland House of Delegates and State Senate, we must comment on the recent articles about Jon Cardin's missed votes," states a letter signed by lawmakers who support Cardin's opponent in a race for attorney general, Sen. Brian Frosh. "We have been trying to wrap our heads around his unacceptable attendance record and want to say clearly and unequivocally: under no circumstances should a member of the legislature selectively decide to skip 75% of his or her committee votes.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Is it the creativity on offense, or his work at the defensive end?Is it the way his team usually wins, or how he was nearly a part of Arkansas' run to the NCAA title last season?None of the above. With Michael Lloyd, the topic of discussion is usually his scarlet letter, and in his case, the A stands for attitude.The putdowns and pained expressions that were accepted on (( the playgrounds of Baltimore don't always sit well with teammates, coaches and referees. As the biggest star on a Dunbar High team that was the nation's best and now as the point guard for Syracuse University, Lloyd has labored to get his emotions under control and cease being his own worst enemy.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | June 22, 1999
You may have noticed that the best way to sell something these days, whether it's a product or your very self, is to package it with a bit of attitude.Consider that the jersey of Latrell Sprewell, who got an involuntary paid vacation because he tried to give P.J. Carlesimo a finger necklace without a clasp, sells more than that of any other New York Knicks player. Meanwhile, David Robinson and Tim Duncan of San Antonio, both solid citizens whose only hook is sterling play, are thought of as weird or even worse, freaks, because they aren't weird or freaks and don't carry "attitudes."
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1996
The Ravens have made one basic mistake from the day they arrived in Baltimore.They think they're a better team than they really are. That attitude cost them yesterday when they took a 21-3 halftime lead over the Cincinnati Bengals and thought they were good enough to sleepwalk their way through the second half and still escape with a victory. After all, Denver did it two weeks ago against the Ravens when it gave away a 21-3 lead and still won, 45-34.They found out they're not good enough to do that and blew a 24-21 game to the Bengals while losing for the first time when they've been favored.
NEWS
By RAY FRAGER | October 6, 1996
I'M STARTING an athletic shoe company. All I need is to line up some endorsements, and I'm all set. My shoes will be all about attitude. You know, just do it. It's your planet.T-shirts, too, I want to do T-shirts. With some pithy phrases: No fear; Second place is the first loser; I'm the bus driver - I take everyone to school.I know this won't be easy. All of those phrases are taken. Most of the best attitude-endowed athletes are taken. But there are athletes out there, I know it.You think I could get the University of Nebraska football team?
NEWS
July 12, 1996
IF THERE IS ONE thing policemen hate, it's an attitude. The display of a little deference can make all the difference between a hefty ticket and being sent on your way with the admonition to slow down from now on. In the case of David R. Lemmon, the Baltimore City firefighter arrested for speeding Mondaywhile trying to get his sick baby to the doctor, attitude accounts for why he ended up in handcuffs -- despite circumstances that cried out for leniency.This...
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
CHICAGO -- It's an attitude, not a strategy. The Orioles hit the ground running this year, and they have sprinted to one of the best starts in club history.There are obvious examples. Mark McLemore steaming home from second base on a sacrifice fly in Tuesday night's victory over the Texas Rangers. Brady Anderson stealing 12 bases in his first 14 attempts. But truly to appreciate the team's dramatic turnaround, you have to read between the base lines. The subtle things are what make it apparent that the Orioles have undergone a serious attitude adjustment.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The generation gap that many credit with moving the needle on same-sex marriage apparently crosses party lines. According to a new Pew Research Center survey , 61 percent of Republicans under 30 -- a clear majority -- favor allowing same-sex marriage, while 35 percent oppose it. That's a marked difference from both their older counterparts and the party at large. Only 27 percent of Republicans over 50 support allowing gay and lesbian couples to wed, according to the poll, compared with 39 percent approval from Republicans overall.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Within months after leaving Maryland as a junior in the spring of 2005, John Gilchrist realized he had made a mistake. Sitting in his apartment in Rishon LeZion, a coastal town in Israel where he had begun what would become a nomadic professional basketball career, Gilchrist wrote an email apologizing to his former coach, Gary Williams, and to former Terps assistant Dave Dickerson, by then the head coach at Tulane. "I just basically poured my guts out to them," Gilchrist recalled on a trip back to College Park last month.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
As a former Baltimore City schoolteacher I read with interest your story regarding workers' compensation for teachers injured by students ( "Painful lessons: Run-ins with students take toll on teachers, city finances," Feb. 16). While I was never injured myself, I broke up many a fight in my 6 t h - and 7 t h -grade classrooms, and there were occasions where I certainly felt concerned for my own safety confronting a particularly threatening student. What I find especially appalling is the idea that a teacher, due to "ineffectiveness," is in any way responsible for the behavior of children who assault one another or staff members at school.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
As one might anticipate, the anointing of a new head coach has led to some changes at Hood. Brad Barber, an assistant coach under Jeremy Mattoon who was promoted in July after Matton and the school parted ways, is careful not to criticize his predecessor. But Barber did say that the players' attitude is different thus far. “This is a new year, and one of the biggest things we did this fall in fall ball was we really understood the type of athletes that we have,” he said. “We tried to put in a new mentality, and everyone's bought in. Everyone's on the same page, everyone's accepted their responsibility, we're getting out in the community more.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 14, 2013
In a December 4 speech, President Obama declared income "inequality" to be "the defining challenge of our time. " It is time for me to come clean; to own up to a dark secret I have been hiding most of my life. It is embarrassing to admit it, but I suffer from income inequality. Yes, there are hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions of people who make more money than I do and it has affected my life in ways too numerous to recount. Starting with my first summer job as a bellhop and kitchen worker at a hotel in  Maine when I was 14, I kept records of the amount of money I earned.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Mark Turgeon sees most of the same faces at practice these days as he did in his first two seasons at Maryland, yet in some ways he is coaching a completely different team. Not only has the talent improved dramatically, but so has the chemistry. The first season when he inherited a fairly dysfunctional group from Gary Williams - made more difficult by the fact that his best player, Terrell Stoglin, was the toughest to coach  - is becoming a distant memory. Even last season, after Stoglin left the program and the Terps improved from 17-15 to 25-13, it wasn't easy trying to mesh four freshmen and two transfers with the three players remaining who had been recruited by Williams (sophomore Nick Faust, junior guard Pe'Shon Howard and senior James Padgett)
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2006
KENNETT SQUARE, PA. -- Barbaro's attitude and appetite were upbeat again yesterday, as the vigil over the injured Kentucky Derby winner reached an uneventful 57th day at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals. Dr. Dean Richardson, chief of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center, said in a statement that Barbaro got another restful night Saturday and remains in stable condition. "His vital signs are good and his attitude remains positive," Richardson said.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 13, 1994
Happy is the lot of a family in a position to pay $14,615 on a 1980 tax obligation.Rwanda is where the Tutsi are trying to overthrow the Hutu; in Burundi, it's the other way round.At least Don won't have to worry about the legislature ever again.The official attitude toward responsibility for fixing up Memorial Stadium is to leave it to the Canadians.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 9, 2013
From graffiti on buses ("Virgin. Teach your kids it's not a dirty world") to posters of chickens in tennis shoes ("What do you call a guy who makes a baby, then flies the coop?") to the heart-rending pleas of real teens ("Mom. Dad. Talk to me. I need you now. "), Baltimore's Campaign for Our Children has for a quarter century brought the polished skills of Madison Avenue to the problem of teen pregnancy. Through its symbiotic relationship with the successful ad agency Richardson, Myers and Donofrio, now Carton Donofrio Partners, the campaign was also able to leverage the agency's media relationships into free space on buses and billboards and free time on the airwaves.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | August 22, 2013
While those in the education world are gearing up for a whirlwind of public education reforms this school year, the general public either don't know or disapprove of the most significant ones that will impact teachers and students here in Maryland, and across the nation. According to an annual survey of the public's attitude toward education, two out of three people had never heard of the new Common Core Standards, which will overhaul curricula in more than 40 states this year.
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