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By Chris Kaltenbach | December 25, 1997
A magnificent performance from Gregory Peck and Horton Foote's understated screenplay help make "To Kill a HTC Mockingbird" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) a movie that won nearly universal acclaim, from both audiences and critics, when it was released in 1962.Based on Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "Mockingbird" is the story of Atticus Finch, a highly principled Southern lawyer who's called upon to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. It's also about his two children, Jem and Scout (Phillip Alford and Mary Badham)
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
After a successful inaugural three-play season at its Eastport Shopping Center location, Compass Rose Studio Theater opens its second season with Christopher Sergel's stage adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel "To Kill a Mockingbird. " The play's strong script and powerful message make it an ideal vehicle for the Annapolis acting academy-theater. "Since opening its doors to students in 2010, Compass Rose has reached over 400 from age 3 to senior citizens in 10 Anne Arundel venues," founding artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne said.
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By Dave Rosenthal | April 3, 2012
USA Network, the American Film Institute and Universal Pictures said today that President Barack Obama will introduce Saturday's airing of “To Kill A Mockingbird,“ the acclaimed adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel. The tale of lawyer Atticus Finch's battle against racial injustice still resonates with many today -- particularly in light of the Trayvon Martin demonstrations -- and Lee's simple prose makes the novel appropriate for a wide range of readers. The movie, considered one of the best literary adaptations ever made, brings home her powerful message.
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By Dave Rosenthal | April 3, 2012
USA Network, the American Film Institute and Universal Pictures said today that President Barack Obama will introduce Saturday's airing of “To Kill A Mockingbird,“ the acclaimed adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel. The tale of lawyer Atticus Finch's battle against racial injustice still resonates with many today -- particularly in light of the Trayvon Martin demonstrations -- and Lee's simple prose makes the novel appropriate for a wide range of readers. The movie, considered one of the best literary adaptations ever made, brings home her powerful message.
NEWS
December 23, 2008
ROBERT MULLIGAN, 83 Directed "To Kill a Mockingbird" Robert Mulligan, the Academy Award-nominated director of To Kill a Mockingbird who later helped launch the career of Reese Witherspoon, died Saturday at his home in Lyme, Conn. He had suffered from heart disease, his wife, Sandy, said yesterday. Mr. Mulligan was nominated for an Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird, the adaptation of Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about a child's world shaken by the racism of a Southern town.
NEWS
By Jane Lippy and Jane Lippy,Contributing writer | May 8, 1991
As she was reading over plays last summer, one story in particular impressed drama and English teacher Cathy James."I liked what it was saying and the statement it was making," she said of "To Kill a Mockingbird."Under her direction, Liberty's Drama Club will present the emotion-filled, thought-provoking play Thursday through Saturday in the high school auditorium.James, who is directing her fourth play at Liberty, said she hopes to give audiences an "awareness experience," tomake them more aware of prejudice and bigotry.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 28, 2003
WHAT'S THE deal here? Go away for just a little while and celebrities and notables both famous and infamous start dropping like flies. Three were heroes: Lester "Y'all Ain't Eatin' No Chicken In Here" Maddox, former Georgia governor, died Wednesday at 87. Yes, I know what you're thinking: How could I? How could I claim that the racist, segregationist, pickax handle-swinging Maddox -- who wielded the clubs to chase blacks away from his chicken-eating joint in the early 1960s -- is his hero?
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | July 10, 1995
"Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.''That may be Atticus Finch's most memorable piece of fatherly advice in Harper Lee's 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, ''To Kill a Mockingbird.'' But the book is full of the wisdom with which this lonely widower raised his two children and tried to teach them how to act as moral beings in an immoral world.His daughter Jean Louise, or ''Scout,'' as he and everyone else called her, tells us many of the things her father said to her and her brother Jem when they were growing up in the 1930s in the little town of Maycomb, Alabama.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
After a successful inaugural three-play season at its Eastport Shopping Center location, Compass Rose Studio Theater opens its second season with Christopher Sergel's stage adaptation of Harper Lee's acclaimed novel "To Kill a Mockingbird. " The play's strong script and powerful message make it an ideal vehicle for the Annapolis acting academy-theater. "Since opening its doors to students in 2010, Compass Rose has reached over 400 from age 3 to senior citizens in 10 Anne Arundel venues," founding artistic director Lucinda Merry-Browne said.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
Gregory Peck, who died yesterday at age 87, built a tower of celluloid on that now-rare movie quality, strength of character. Like Gary Cooper before him, he expressed with peerless authority what used to be called American virtues: decency, fortitude, self-reliance and an equal capacity for group leadership. With his wife of 48 years, Veronique, at his side, Mr. Peck died of natural causes about 4 a.m. at his Los Angeles home, family spokesman Monroe Friedman said. "He wasn't feeling well," Mr. Friedman said.
NEWS
December 23, 2008
ROBERT MULLIGAN, 83 Directed "To Kill a Mockingbird" Robert Mulligan, the Academy Award-nominated director of To Kill a Mockingbird who later helped launch the career of Reese Witherspoon, died Saturday at his home in Lyme, Conn. He had suffered from heart disease, his wife, Sandy, said yesterday. Mr. Mulligan was nominated for an Oscar for To Kill a Mockingbird, the adaptation of Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about a child's world shaken by the racism of a Southern town.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 28, 2003
WHAT'S THE deal here? Go away for just a little while and celebrities and notables both famous and infamous start dropping like flies. Three were heroes: Lester "Y'all Ain't Eatin' No Chicken In Here" Maddox, former Georgia governor, died Wednesday at 87. Yes, I know what you're thinking: How could I? How could I claim that the racist, segregationist, pickax handle-swinging Maddox -- who wielded the clubs to chase blacks away from his chicken-eating joint in the early 1960s -- is his hero?
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
Gregory Peck, who died yesterday at age 87, built a tower of celluloid on that now-rare movie quality, strength of character. Like Gary Cooper before him, he expressed with peerless authority what used to be called American virtues: decency, fortitude, self-reliance and an equal capacity for group leadership. With his wife of 48 years, Veronique, at his side, Mr. Peck died of natural causes about 4 a.m. at his Los Angeles home, family spokesman Monroe Friedman said. "He wasn't feeling well," Mr. Friedman said.
FEATURES
By Brenda Becker and Brenda Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 19, 1998
Are baby boomer parents raising a generation of moral idiots? This fear would seem to be widespread, to judge from one booming tributary in the seemingly endless river of parenting books: how to raise a moral, virtuous, or even spiritual child. The real challenge, to judge from this crop of books, is raising young paragons of virtue with no embarrassing dependence on God or at least on any "formal" or "organized" religion, with its dread "preaching" and "moralizing." Whether this earnest move toward Religion Lite will nourish the tots remains to be seen.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | December 25, 1997
A magnificent performance from Gregory Peck and Horton Foote's understated screenplay help make "To Kill a HTC Mockingbird" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) a movie that won nearly universal acclaim, from both audiences and critics, when it was released in 1962.Based on Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "Mockingbird" is the story of Atticus Finch, a highly principled Southern lawyer who's called upon to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. It's also about his two children, Jem and Scout (Phillip Alford and Mary Badham)
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | July 10, 1995
"Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.''That may be Atticus Finch's most memorable piece of fatherly advice in Harper Lee's 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, ''To Kill a Mockingbird.'' But the book is full of the wisdom with which this lonely widower raised his two children and tried to teach them how to act as moral beings in an immoral world.His daughter Jean Louise, or ''Scout,'' as he and everyone else called her, tells us many of the things her father said to her and her brother Jem when they were growing up in the 1930s in the little town of Maycomb, Alabama.
FEATURES
By Brenda Becker and Brenda Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 19, 1998
Are baby boomer parents raising a generation of moral idiots? This fear would seem to be widespread, to judge from one booming tributary in the seemingly endless river of parenting books: how to raise a moral, virtuous, or even spiritual child. The real challenge, to judge from this crop of books, is raising young paragons of virtue with no embarrassing dependence on God or at least on any "formal" or "organized" religion, with its dread "preaching" and "moralizing." Whether this earnest move toward Religion Lite will nourish the tots remains to be seen.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | October 22, 1991
Danny DeVito as "Larry the Liquidator," the gleefully remorseless corporate raider of "Other People's Money," is as perfect casting as Gregory Peck's staunch Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird."And the teaming of the actors in "Other People's Money" is felicitous. In one corner: DeVito's diminutive, gargoylelike Lawrence Garfield, devious, shameless and proud of it. In the other corner: Peck's tall, granitelike Andrew Jorgenson -- old-fashioned, virtuous and just as proud as Larry, with more justification.
NEWS
By Jane Lippy and Jane Lippy,Contributing writer | May 8, 1991
As she was reading over plays last summer, one story in particular impressed drama and English teacher Cathy James."I liked what it was saying and the statement it was making," she said of "To Kill a Mockingbird."Under her direction, Liberty's Drama Club will present the emotion-filled, thought-provoking play Thursday through Saturday in the high school auditorium.James, who is directing her fourth play at Liberty, said she hopes to give audiences an "awareness experience," tomake them more aware of prejudice and bigotry.
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