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Attendance

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NEWS
Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
As the city school district debates a new plan from Interim CEO Tisha Edwards to hold principals accountable for chronic absenteeism, many have inquired about how incoming CEO Gregory Thornton deals with attendance accountability in Milwaukee. The Sun received a detailed plan for how Thornton has tackled the issue. Here is what we learned from his team: Steps Thornton has taken to improve attendance include: •    A daily summary of attendance figures by school, region and the district; reviewed by Regional Superintendents daily and discussed weekly with the Superintendent •    Principals have developed attendance action plans •    Schools have attendance committees that are spearheaded by the principal and include representative staff and parents •    Regional Superintendents collaborate with district social workers and the regional administrative teams who work directly with school-based social workers on attendance issues •    Stronger emphasis on Positive Behavior and Intervention Supports (MPS has the nation's largest concentration of students participating in PBIS)
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Students who wish to tailgate for Towson University football games must attend a "risk reduction workshop" before getting a parking pass, one in a series of stricter new rules put in place after officials opted against a full ban this week. At last Saturday's tailgate in the designated student lot, Lot 14, students were dancing on the roofs of cars and were "hostile" and "uncooperative," according to Towson officials. Deb Moriarty, Towson's vice president for student affairs, was so concerned by the behavior and the potential risk to student safety she asked a group of other top officials to consider a ban on student tailgates Wednesday.
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NEWS
September 19, 2012
The Sun wonders why the attendance at Orioles games hasn't been better. Well, it certainly is not helped by the coverage provided by your newspaper. The Sept. 17 Sun has the Ravens, who lost, on the front page of the first section plus the first five pages of the Sports section. Meanwhile the Orioles, in contention for first place, do not appear until page 11 of the Sports section. Go figure! John S. White, Stewartstown, Pa.
SPORTS
Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
The Orioles drew an announced 38,329 for Sunday's finale at Camden Yards for an overall attendance of 2,464,473 in the 80-date season. That easily surpassed their 2012 total of 2.36 million despite having one fewer date (the doubleheader this year on May 1 against the Pittsburgh Pirates was a single-gate admission). This is the highest total attendance the Orioles have had in a season since they drew 2.625 million in 2005. This year's average attendance of 30,806 is the first time Camden Yards has averaged more than 30,000 since 2005.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Jon Morgan and Peter Schmuck and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writers | July 16, 1995
Anaheim, Calif. -- There was no midnight ride. The Los Angeles Rams spent much of June packing up the trucks for their long-anticipated move to St. Louis. The Los Angeles Raiders were not far behind, announcing soon thereafter their intention to move back to Oakland and give up sole football claim to the second-largest sports market in the United States.How can this be? NFL training camps are opening everywhere . . . . everywhere but in Los Angeles and Orange County, a massive metropolitan area that once made sports moguls from other parts of the country drool with envy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, which opened in Baltimore with great fanfare in 2005, has fallen short of attendance and fundraising goals - forcing the state to shore up its finances. During the past five years, annual attendance has averaged 38,000, well short of the 150,000 projected when the Lewis Museum opened, according to data supplied by the museum. Meanwhile, museum officials acknowledge, it has failed to met a state requirement that it generate $2 million, half of its annual budget, in privately raised revenue.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
We read with interest Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton's commentary about the challenges ahead for the city's schools ( "Much work to be done," Aug. 25). As he indicates, one of the greatest barriers to student achievement is attendance, where there is still substantial work to do. Baltimore continues to suffer from rampant truancy and chronic absenteeism. What can we do to address this crisis? Since 2005, the University of Baltimore School of Law and its partners have worked with the schools to operate a Truancy Court Program, an early intervention, non-adversarial, non-punitive approach to truancy that aims to identify why children are not attending school and then attempts to resolve the underlying problems or causes.
SPORTS
Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
The Orioles drew an announced 38,329 for Sunday's finale at Camden Yards for an overall attendance of 2,464,473 in the 80-date season. That easily surpassed their 2012 total of 2.36 million despite having one fewer date (the doubleheader this year on May 1 against the Pittsburgh Pirates was a single-gate admission). This is the highest total attendance the Orioles have had in a season since they drew 2.625 million in 2005. This year's average attendance of 30,806 is the first time Camden Yards has averaged more than 30,000 since 2005.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
The Orioles announced tonight's attendance as 17,383 - remember that is tickets sold and not necessarily people in the seats. The actual attendance is obviously lower, but I think there were more people here than I had anticipated -- given the fact that the Super Bowl champion Ravens open up tonight in Denver. I've seen worse crowds at Camden Yards over the years, that's for sure. One more important note about the attendance: The Orioles have officially gone over the 2 million mark now - they are at 2,007,672 for 68 home dates.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
The three students who share one of the biggest accomplishments in Baltimore County this year say they never sought to be perfect. They just tried to be present. Carly Ordak, Danielle Spyridakos and Renee Yusuff graduated Tuesday from Eastern Technical High School with perfect attendance records, having attended school every day from kindergarten through 12th grade. They were the only students in Baltimore County to graduate this year having done that. "I think this is an incredible accomplishment," said Tom Evans, principal of Eastern Tech.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was discharged from the University of Maryland Medical Center Sunday, where she had been since experiencing chest pains and shortness of breath Saturday night at the Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Fort McHenry. Doctors performed what the mayor's aides described as "a series of tests to assess her medical condition" before releasing her. She spent less than 24 hours at the hospital and has cancelled her public appearances for Monday. After her release, Rawlings-Blake said she had pushed herself "a bit too hard" amid the celebrations to mark the bicentennial of the Battle of Baltimore and the creation of the Star-Spangled Banner.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger and Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Ray Rice and his wife, Janay, on Saturday made their first public appearance since a video surfaced Monday showing the former star Ravens running back knocking her out in a casino elevator and he was suspended indefinitely by the NFL. The couple returned to the place where Rice was once a celebrated all-state player - his hometown of New Rochelle, N.Y. - to see his former high school football team play Ramapo of Spring Valley, N.Y. Rice was...
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
President Barack Obama will visit Baltimore on Friday for a fundraiser intended to help Democrats defend their Senate majority, a White House official said today. Obama, who last spent time in the city in May 2013, will attend a fundraiser to benefit the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. Details of the event were not immediately available. The president has stepped up fundraising this year ahead of the November midterm elections, including for vulnerable Senate incumbents.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Marie E. Scott, a homemaker who enjoyed attending auctions, playing bridge and traveling to France, died of cancer Aug. 27 at her Homeland residence. She was 87. The daughter of George Grant Thomas, a banker, and Marie Elise Donahue Thomas, the former Marie Elise Thomas was born in Philadelphia and moved with her family to Oakenshawe. She graduated from Notre Dame Preparatory School in 1945 and from the Bard Avon School, a Baltimore business and secretarial school, in 1946. In 1947, she went to work as a secretary for a doctor and in the late 1940s, she became secretary to the chairman of the engineering department at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
We read with interest Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton's commentary about the challenges ahead for the city's schools ( "Much work to be done," Aug. 25). As he indicates, one of the greatest barriers to student achievement is attendance, where there is still substantial work to do. Baltimore continues to suffer from rampant truancy and chronic absenteeism. What can we do to address this crisis? Since 2005, the University of Baltimore School of Law and its partners have worked with the schools to operate a Truancy Court Program, an early intervention, non-adversarial, non-punitive approach to truancy that aims to identify why children are not attending school and then attempts to resolve the underlying problems or causes.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | November 28, 1992
With a big assist from his father, Torrence White, 8, has no missed a day of school this year.Considering Torrence missed almost 50 days of school last year, his perfect attendance thus far is a really big deal for the third-grader and his family."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
Does the New York Racing Association deserve to hold the Breeders' Cup?That was the question many writers who covered the event were asking last week. Even though the facilities for the animals are excellent, the atmosphere for at least some humans is depressing.Low attendance at the Belmont track and lack of attention paid to racing's fall championship series by the New York media were among reasons cited by racing reporters for low morale.Many of them feel Churchill Downs in Kentucky and the Southern California and Florida tracks, where the Breeders' Cup is more of an event and there is an atmosphere of excitement, are far better locations.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Hannah Sheats raises goats, makes clothes and bakes items with the 4-H to show at the Maryland State Fair. But the 11-year-old Parkton girl hasn't been to the State Fairgrounds in Timonium as much as she'd like since Baltimore County public schools opened Wednesday. Hannah, who attends Hereford Middle School, thinks she'd be learning more at the fair. "At school, in the first couple of weeks you don't do anything. It's kind of pointless," she said. "With 4-H, you always learn something new. You never stop.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
An 18-year-old Rockville man was one of four college students killed in a plane crash in Ohio Monday night, police said. Abraham Pishevar, a Georgetown Preparatory School graduate and freshman at Case Western Reserve University, died in the crash at about 10 p.m., shortly after takeoff at Cuyahoga County Regional Airport, according to the Ohio Highway Patrol. The other three men aboard the small Cessna aircraft were also Case Western students - William Felten, 20, of Saginaw, Mich.; Lucas Marcelli, 20, of Massillon, Ohio; and John Hill, 18, of St. Simons, Ga., the university said.
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