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NEWS
May 24, 1994
In recent days, the deaths of two former occupants of the White House, Richard Nixon and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, have brought renewed attention to the rights of Americans to forgo life-prolonging medical treatment. In both these cases, doctors followed the clearly expressed wishes of adult patients who wanted to be able to die in peace, once it was determined that nothing could reverse the course of their illnesses.Where children are concerned, however, the question arouses more controversy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Maggie Kaulius is the latest in an Archbishop Spalding legacy that includes her entire immediate family and much of her extended family. Like her mother, Mary Love Kaulius, she plays field hockey and lacrosse. The younger Kaulius helped the No. 2 field hockey team to its first Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference championship and the No. 4 lacrosse team to the fourth seed in the IAAM tournament this season. The Cavaliers play Monday in the quarterfinals. A regional All-American in lacrosse last season, the senior midfielder has 45 goals and 25 assists this spring and more than 100 career goals.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 4, 1996
Howard County pupils will attend classes through June 19 -- six days beyond the scheduled last day of school -- because of Friday's canceled school day.If inclement weather forces any more days to be canceled, the school system will need to lengthen school days this spring.Howard students have missed eight days of classes so far this school year because of snow or ice. To make up for the lost time, a teacher training day scheduled for last month was replaced with regular classes, and pupils will attend school on the President's Day holiday Feb. 19.But the school board's scheduling policy says that the school year cannot be extended beyond June 19, meaning that the only way to make up any more lost time would be to lengthen school days.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Baltimore school board is considering a more than 20 percent tuition increase next year for students who are not residents, which would make the city's rates higher than Baltimore County's and competitive with some Catholic programs. Officials have proposed raising tuition for middle and high school students to $7,500. Elementary-age students would pay $7,000. Currently, the district charges $5,900 for middle/high school tuition and $5,670 for elementary tuition. School officials said the increase would make its tuition rates, currently among the lowest in the state, more competitive.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | January 19, 1994
Despite resounding opposition to year-round schooling in a recent survey, the Howard County school board is pressing ahead with a proposal for state funding to explore the idea."
NEWS
April 26, 2006
Property tax cut harms our schools Unfortunately, the short-term thinking that too often plagues Annapolis during an election year seems to have trumped the long-term needs of Maryland's citizens ("Tax cut puts school construction on hold," April 22). In 2003, the Maryland State Task Force to Study Public School Facilities conducted a statewide assessment of public school buildings to determine whether the buildings were appropriate. The result of the assessment was staggering - it found that Maryland and its counties need to invest more than $4 billion to bring all of Maryland's public school buildings up to contemporary standards.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
City Councilman Martin O'Malley plans to launch his television advertisement campaign today in Baltimore's mayoral race with a commercial promoting his solution for fixing the city's ailing school system.The 30-second commercial features O'Malley in several scenes, including one in a classroom and one where he is surrounded by children. An unseen narrator says, "These are the faces of our city's most precious resource: Children. And Martin O'Malley has a plan to keep them safe and well-educated."
NEWS
May 30, 1995
One of the nation's leading advocates for year-round schools says he envisions a time in the 21st century in which school children learn at their home computer pods year-round and only attend school a couple of days a week for "acculturation purposes." Whether that Orwellian vision comes true, we can't foretell, but it's a good bet it will be the far distant future, if ever, before Maryland adopts broad year-round schooling.Former Gov. William Donald Schaefer liked the idea, mostly as a way to use schools throughout the year to hold down capital costs.
NEWS
September 27, 1994
Here's what the two main candidates for governor say about year-round schooling, a concept being studied in a half-dozen Maryland school systems that's of concern to parents who see its flaws.Republican Ellen Sauerbrey: "I'm not that gung-ho for it . . . I have major concerns about the impact on families. Families are under such pressure."Democrat Parris Glendening: "It's an issue brought to me daily, at least by friends of my 14-year-old son. I do not support it as a mandatory program. I can see hardships for families.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1994
When winter weather is bad, Paul E. Welch, Harford's transportation supervisor for schools, says he can't win.If he decides to close the schools he gets "hate calls" from parents who say their roads are clear and schools should have been open.If he decides not to close the schools he gets "hate calls" from parents who say their roads are dangerously covered with ice or snow and they should have been closed.Last month, when school was delayed seven days and closed for nine, his phone was ringing off the hook.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
In the early 1800s, a successful businessman watched as young homeless girls roamed the docks of Baltimore, selling items to survive. He thought that if they just had an education, that could make all of the difference. So he began planning for a school. When the Samuel Ready School for Female Orphans closed its doors in 1977, a scholarship foundation took its place, and in the past 20 years, it has given $10 million in financial assistance to about 250 young girls in the Baltimore area so that they can complete middle and high school at one of six prestigious independent schools.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Anybody who has ever encountered the college admissions process knows that there's no such thing as an even playing field. Most schools will admit that upfront. "Like all colleges," Harvard College notes on its own admissions web site, "we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible. " In other words, schools often try to balance out an incoming class with students who not only have good grades or high test scores but have had unusual life experiences as well as those they regard as "well rounded.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Senate Minority Leader E.J. Pipkin announced Monday he would retire from the legislature next week and move to Texas to pursue a graduate degree in sports management. Pipkin, 56, served as Republican's chief debater in the Maryland Senate, leading opposition in recent years to the state's new gun-control law, legalization of same-sex marriage, repeal of the death penalty and off-shore wind program. The former investment banker was first elected to the legislature in 2002, knocking of a Democrat and incumbent chairman of the Judicial Proceedings Committee, Pipkin's chief of staff John Fiastro said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Glenelg High School is gearing up for its prom safe-driving events, which include a scheduled visit from NASCAR driver Kurt Busch. School officials said Busch will be a guest speaker at a schoolwide assembly April 23, the start of Glenelg's Prom Safety Week. It is one of several safety-related events that the school is offering throughout the year. Steve Willingham, Glenelg's student resource officer, said Busch is scheduled to talk about the importance of safe driving from his perspective as a professional driver and how speed is a factor in collisions, particularly those involving young people.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Liz F. Kay and Arin Gencer and Liz F. Kay,arin.gencer@baltsun.com and liz.kay@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
For some Baltimore County students and their parents, getting ready for the school year that starts today involves more than just restocking the pencil box and buying new clothes. These parents must prove that the children really live in the county - even if the kids have been going to county schools for years. The new policy applies to students moving from elementary to middle school or from middle to high school. And it is designed, at least in part, to prevent students who live outside Baltimore County from fraudulently attending county schools, a concern voiced in recent years by lawmakers.
NEWS
By Barbara Babb and Gloria Danziger | June 11, 2008
Is giving a student an alarm clock part of the answer to truancy in Baltimore? Experience tells us that it can be. But make no mistake: There's no simple answer to this vexing problem. There are, however, a number of things that we know can help. In the University of Baltimore School of Law's Truancy Court Program, we work with students every week who are in danger of joining the thousands of city children who do not attend school. Since 2005, we have learned a few things about what connects truancy, suspension, dropping out, crime and violence.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
Whether they were for or against delaying the time that high schoolers in Anne Arundel County begin their school day, many of the 60 or so parents, students and teachers who attended a forum on the issue urged the board of education to take action soon, and not wait for the community to agree on a solution. "You will not receive a consensus," said one parent, who said her son, a high school student, was sleep deprived. More than two hours of testimony at a forum Wednesday night revealed that the community is split when it comes to tinkering with the times that county children attend school.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
A proposed law aimed at cracking down on students who use fake addresses to enroll outside their home school districts has set off a debate about how rigidly Maryland counties should guard their borders.Christopher T. Cross, president of the State Board of Education, said yesterday that lawmakers should consider letting students attend school wherever they want, as long as there's room. State and local funding would follow the students."If you want to improve the quality of education for everybody you open it up and allow the opportunity for choice," said Cross, president of the Council for Basic Education in Washington, which works on school reform nationally.
NEWS
April 26, 2006
Property tax cut harms our schools Unfortunately, the short-term thinking that too often plagues Annapolis during an election year seems to have trumped the long-term needs of Maryland's citizens ("Tax cut puts school construction on hold," April 22). In 2003, the Maryland State Task Force to Study Public School Facilities conducted a statewide assessment of public school buildings to determine whether the buildings were appropriate. The result of the assessment was staggering - it found that Maryland and its counties need to invest more than $4 billion to bring all of Maryland's public school buildings up to contemporary standards.
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