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By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | March 24, 2006
As he watched some of his North County High School classmates enjoy their junior year, take after-school jobs and go out with friends, Romeo Urias says he sometimes got depressed. "I felt like I was the only one up late [studying]; everyone else is enjoying life, and I'm not," he said. His parents wouldn't let him work at a job after school, insisting that he focus on his studies and school activities. Besides, when would he have time? He was rising at 6 a.m., after going to sleep at 1 a.m. Football, track, band and Advanced Placement classes made for a full schedule.
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SPORTS
By Chris Korman | April 16, 2012
Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis has been subpoenaed as a defense witness in the trial of former Bengals linebacker Nate Webster, according to the Associated Press. Webster faces seven counts related to sexual conduct with the teen-aged daughter of an assistant coach in Cincinnati. He allegedly threatened the girl using guns to keep her from telling anyone; he'd apparently met her by asking her to babysit his children. The case is expected to last into next week. Webster, like Lewis, attended Miami.
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NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
As support flags for considering race in college admissions, some educators are gingerly weighing a racially neutral alternative: giving a boost to the prospects of students whose parents did not attend college.Campus officials are not embracing the notion as a single-shot replacement for affirmative action, and they are quick to say they are not abandoning the notion of racial diversity at their campuses. But the "first generation" approach -- the mirror image to the advantage given by many schools to the children of alumni -- is gaining currency, college administrators say."
SPORTS
By Benjamin Snyder, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2011
For Beatrice Capra, reaching the third round of last year's U.S. Open seemed less like a fairytale and more like a wakeup call. While the amateur tennis player from Ellicott City had a chance to showcase her talent at the Grand Slam tournament, it also forced her to realize she was growing up and needed to make some major decisions. Almost a year after facing Maria Sharapova at Arthur Ashe Stadium, Capra, 19, is preparing to attend Duke University in the fall. That means pushing aside an opportunity to play professionally, a decision that was only made tougher by her success at the Open.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
The deadline for applications for the annual Maryland Art League $1,000 scholarship, to be awarded to a high school senior who plans to attend college in the fall of 1991, is March 30.All Maryland high school seniors who plan to pursue an education in the visual arts areeligible.The award will be applied to tuition at the college of the winner's choice.Information and application: Laura Kestle, 747-6096.
NEWS
July 11, 1995
An article Sunday about tuition breaks given to university researchers understated the value of the benefit at the Johns Hopkins University. Hopkins annually offers the equivalent of half its tuition -- or $9,400 -- for all employees and their spouses and dependents to attend college. Last year, 627 employees took part in the program.Also, the last name of Jean and David Sack was spelled incorrectly.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By JOHN C. WILKINS III | February 3, 1997
YOUR JAN. 25 editorial, "Pre-paid tuition," appears to support Maryland's adoption of a system that allows parents to pay for a child's college education during their entire childhood rather than paying for college during those valuable school years and beyond.Your editorial does point out some of the negatives that the state must consider in order to implement the policy effectively, such as taxpayers bearing the cost of tuition should it rise above the level collected in the fund. But the editorial does not go far enough into negative effects of this policy.
SPORTS
By DAVE JOSEPH | July 4, 2005
LET YOUNG ATHLETES earn, then learn. In a perfect world, LeBron James and Morgan Pressel would attend college. They would make new friends, experience the joys of academia, and, eventually, learn the difference between Dostoyevsky and Gwen Stefani. But this isn't a perfect world and there's no room for Pollyanna in professional or amateur (whatever that means) sports. Yet, in the past few weeks - with the NBA raising its age limit and Pressel and Michelle Wie taking high school vacation to compete in the U.S. Women's Open - some are once again complaining that young athletes are turning professional too soon.
NEWS
February 7, 2003
FAFSA is a four-letter word in some households. In others, it's a mystery. As millions of parents and college students know, FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid, the 1040-like form college-bound students must submit to be eligible for financial assistance. Uncle Sam's computers look over the form and determine how much students and their families should be expected to contribute toward paying for college. The rest can be made up through grants, loans and work-study.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | August 26, 1991
State higher education officials are encouraged by statistics that show more Maryland high school graduates staying in the state to attend college.The Maryland Higher Education Commission last week released data showing 38.5 percent of state high school graduates enrolled as full-time freshman at a college or university in the state. That figure was compared to statistics from 1985, when 34.5 percent of graduates did so.State Higher Education Secretary Shaila Aery attributes the slight increase to better funding of state universities and colleges and to her administration's focus to make scholarships available to more students.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
The man charged in connection with last month's fatal shooting of a 19-year-old woman in Better Waverly is in jail and being held without bail in connection with a January armed robbery, according to court records. James Cureton, 21, of the 5200 block of Anthony Lane, now faces first-degree murder and other charges in the death of Tanise Ervin. Authorities had described her as an innocent bystander who had just graduated from high school and was planning to attend college to study nursing.
NEWS
January 24, 2011
Maryland spends, on average, a total of nearly $200,000 each to educate its students from kindergarten through grade 12. Obviously, the state has a lot invested in every one of them — and just as obviously, it would be folly to throw any of it away. Yet that's precisely what the current rules regarding in-state college tuition rates for children of illegal immigrants seem designed to accomplish. While Maryland students who are U.S. citizens are automatically entitled to reduced rates at the state's public colleges and universities, those who aren't must pay out-of-state rates.
NEWS
January 18, 2009
Schools must push city kids toward college As quoted in Peter Hermann's revealing column "Baltimore kids tell forum on juvenile justice why they have given up on going to school" (Jan. 11), I feel Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is exactly right in concluding, "We have to reassess how we sell schools to our kids." In my opinion, what needs to be sold to city kids is a value that is second nature in our middle and upper classes: the idea that the imperative to become well-educated is a given.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 10, 2008
Michael Avery, a 6-foot-4 eighth-grader from Lake Sherwood, Calif., hasn't even decided where he's going to attend high school yet. There are a number of prep schools around the country vying for his enrollment. But Avery, a rising basketball prospect on the AAU circuit, does know where he's going to attend college: the University of Kentucky. You see, the Wildcats have already offered him a basketball scholarship. Rivals.com broke the news to the world earlier this week, letting us know that Kentucky's coach, Billy Gillispie, had seen the 14-year-old play at an AAU tournament and decided he wanted to lock him up with an oral commitment before anyone else could.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | July 6, 2007
We've all seen the bitingly clever bumper stickers that proclaim, "My child and my money go to X University." As a college professor, when my students gripe about $50,000 annual costs and associated debt, I tell them they don't want to know what I paid a quarter-century ago (60 times less in current dollars). But new research by Public Agenda and the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education indicates that Americans' unease - even bitterness - toward higher education runs deeper than Mercedes-a-year tuition bills.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2007
Brittany Lomax earned respectable grades and stayed out of trouble. But dealing with family crises such as a heroin-addicted mother and homelessness left little time to ponder college. When she began high school four years ago, her goal was to graduate and get a job. That changed three years ago when she enrolled in a college-prep program at Dundalk High School. "Now, instead of thinking that I want a job, I know that I can have a career," said Lomax, 17, who recently won a $20,000 scholarship, a laptop from the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation and about $15,000 in annual grants for four years of college.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
Some Anne Arundel students soon may be able to take part in a college scholarship program that offers a buffer against homesickness and other trials they could face on campus. For 15 years, the New York-based Posse Foundation has given full scholarships to more than 900 public high school seniors so they can attend college along with a group of peers from their community. Anne Arundel administrators say they will nominate 10 students for the program, hoping that, like other county-based efforts to prepare children for college, it helps them make it to graduation day. Next month, Posse will begin selecting about 20 students from around the Washington area to join the freshman classes at Iowa's Grinnell College or Bucknell University in central Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 15, 2007
Westminster Mayor Tom Ferguson said he never imagined he would find himself welcoming to town the author of a play as candid and jarring as The Vagina Monologues. But feminist playwright Eve Ensler, who promotes her work around the world, is coming to Carroll Community College for a local rendition of her play Friday. It is the county's fifth performance of The Vagina Monologues, and organizers said they have been hoping for years to lure Ensler here. Still, given Ensler's celebrity and worldwide travels, activist and organizer Sylviea Tejeda can't believe the celebrated playwright is visiting.
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