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NEWS
By Ron Smith | October 21, 2010
When asked about political "attack ads," American voters overwhelmingly express their disapproval of them. Yet negative ads persist because they work. As Nov. 2 approaches, the airwaves are filled with such ads accusing rival candidates of all sorts of dastardly deeds, of possessing questionable character and of being stooges of powerful special interests. I read an interesting comment by political science professor Ken Warren of St. Louis University that people often have the misconception that negative ads must be true in order to be aired.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 11, 2014
It might seem counterintuitive, but constantly speaking ill of your political opponent can work to his advantage. And that might be what's happened in the Maryland gubernatorial campaign between Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, the Democratic candidate, and real estate executive Larry Hogan, the Republican. Brown and the Democrats have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to portray Hogan as a corporate shill with extreme views on social issues and guns. If you've watched any television over the past few weeks, you've likely seen ads claiming that Hogan is "too dangerous" for Maryland.
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NEWS
November 2, 1994
What this country needs is a good automatic attack-ad zapper. Unwary voters, who will be besieged during this last week of the campaign with television and radio assaults by one politician on another, should have some means of protection from the lies, distortions and groin-kicks polluting the airwaves. But until technology comes to the rescue, every citizen will have to rely on her/his own resources.That means pushing the zap button. Or the mute button. Or the scan button. Or, better yet, take a walk, visit the refrigerator, read a book.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 5, 2006
There's nothing like a bitter political campaign and daily attack ads on TV to restore your faith in humanity, is there? Why, a candidate can't even go on the air and hold up a dog and profess his love for puppies anymore. No, as soon as he does, his opponent comes out with an attack ad. "What does Candidate A have against cats?" the ad might say. "Do we really want a cat-hater in the U.S. Senate? Vote for Candidate B. He loves all domestic animals." So now Candidate A feels he has to respond in kind.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
SMYRNA, Ga. -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich presented himself as a leader more honored than humbled yesterday after having been personally targeted in an estimated 75,000 Democratic attack ads across the country in one of the most vituperative campaigns in modern politicking."
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,sun reporter | October 16, 2006
Both Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Mayor Martin O'Malley have experience with campaign ads designed to make you feel good about them: Ehrlich talking about his modest upbringing in Arbutus, "where flags fly on the Fourth," and O'Malley's mother rhapsodizing about his sterling character. You won't be seeing any more of them. As the Nov.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
If you thought the televised ads in Maryland's gubernatorial race seemed particularly negative recently, it's not just you.  New data released Tuesday ranked Maryland as having the highest percentage of negative television ads in any gubernatorial race in the nation.  The Wesleyan Media Project tracks all broadcast political ads in every statewide congressional and gubernatorial contest in the country. The group labels the content of each ad as either "negative," "contrast," or "positive.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
The editorial in Sunday's Sunpaper entitled "The wrong vision" (Aug. 12) seems to be a print version of the PAC-inspired attack ads that evidently have impressed your editors enough to take the syncopated view that any idea that isn't from the current administration is not worthy of consideration. May I suggest that The Sun deputize your crack financial reporters to do the analysis of the key fiscal issues facing the country, and please, don't rely merely on the hand picked and biased D.C. operatives that are flooding the media with their one sided views.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | October 18, 1996
BOSTON -- Have you noticed a certain rise in attack ads this year? Not a numerical rise, mind you. What you might call a tonal rise. The political voices broadcast in ads across the nation have been ratcheted up as much as an octave. Assaults that used to be launched by baritones now are set off by sopranos.Follow this musical triptik across the sound waves of the political season.You're driving along Route 66 when a narrator warns about a moral crisis: ''The problem isn't in your house. The problem is in the White House, Bill Clinton's White House.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
If you thought the televised ads in Maryland's gubernatorial race seemed particularly negative recently, it's not just you.  New data released Tuesday ranked Maryland as having the highest percentage of negative television ads in any gubernatorial race in the nation.  The Wesleyan Media Project tracks all broadcast political ads in every statewide congressional and gubernatorial contest in the country. The group labels the content of each ad as either "negative," "contrast," or "positive.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Wednesday marks the anniversary of Maryland's tough new gun control law going into effect, and advocates are marking the occasion with a rally in Columbia. The law is getting some recognition in the governor's race, too, with Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, the Democrat, hammering at his opponent, Republican Larry Hogan, for opposing the state's assault weapons ban, the ban on sales of high-capacity ammunition magazines and "common sense background checks. " The claims are true in that Mr. Hogan opposed Senate Bill 281 of 2013, the gun control legislation Gov. Martin O'Malley pushed through (with some assistance from Mr. Brown)
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Candidates for Maryland governor unleashed dueling attack ads Monday, heightening a negative contest that has been marked by name-calling and hostility. Republican Larry Hogan's ad plays off an attack Democrat Anthony G. Brown has already lobbed against him: the opponent would take the state "backwards. " Hogan's 40-second ad highlights the pocketbook issues that he has made the centerpiece of his campaign and charged that the O'Malley-Brown administration was responsible for the economic recession.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
When an opponent launches a site attacking your candidate's credibility, what do you do? You launch a competing one, of course. Before Republican Larry Hogan even announced his new site that decries Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's attack ads as lies, the Maryland Democratic Party ferreted out the site's likely URL this morning. And then the Democrats launched their own site, with just one letter differing from Hogan's. At stopbrownslies.com , voters can see Hogan's petition to ask local television stations to stop airing ads Hogan says distorts his record on a half-dozen issues.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The war of words in the race for governor escalated Thursday as Republican Larry Hogan called his Democratic rival a liar and asked him to take down a series of "slanderous" advertisements. "I've been around politics for a long time. I know it's a rough and tumble business," Hogan told reporters at his Annapolis headquarters. "This is the most deceitful, most dishonest campaign that I have ever witnessed in my entire life. " Hogan said Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's television spots mischaracterize his positions on abortion, gun control, tuition rates, taxes and pre-kindergarten.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
"Presidents who obsess over history obsess about their place in it, instead of forging it. " -- Frank Underwood President Walker and his party are the target of some attack ads, designed to sway voters before the 2014 midterm elections. While the source of the funding for the ads will remain a mystery for a while (as if), Walker wants to find out where the money came from and put a stop to them, so that the blue team will fare well both in 2014 and in 2016.  Walker gives Frank a verbal beating, ripping him for everything from botching relations with China to not handling the House.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 11, 2002
BOSTON - Before we wrap this election up for hazardous waste collection day, may I take one last trip down (bad) memory lane? On Tuesday at precisely 7:13 a.m., I found myself in the voting booth, pen in hand, choosing candidates for 14 offices. The problem was that eight of the nominees were running against the same opponent: Nobody. These candidates were destined to win by margins nearly as great as those enjoyed by Saddam Hussein. Thus, "Nobody" was added as a postscript to my own list of winners and losers for 2002.
NEWS
By Steve Palay | November 6, 1990
TELEVISION DAY is upon us. You may know this day as Election Day, but let's face facts. There is almost nothing left to modern politics but television, so we should call the day what it really is -- Television Day.Of course, there is also almost nothing but television left to sports as well, or to entertainment, or to the American family, but this is only more reason to give television its day in the sun.It's not that people watch more TV on this day: In...
NEWS
August 15, 2012
The editorial in Sunday's Sunpaper entitled "The wrong vision" (Aug. 12) seems to be a print version of the PAC-inspired attack ads that evidently have impressed your editors enough to take the syncopated view that any idea that isn't from the current administration is not worthy of consideration. May I suggest that The Sun deputize your crack financial reporters to do the analysis of the key fiscal issues facing the country, and please, don't rely merely on the hand picked and biased D.C. operatives that are flooding the media with their one sided views.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
In the year of the super PAC, it looked as if citizens might get some relief through a Federal Commission Communications vote in April requiring TV stations to post online who was buying political ads and how much they were spending. But pushback from broadcasters and the vagaries of an act that had been intended to provide better information now make it look like disclosure and transparency are nowhere in immediate sight. Crossroads GPS, an independent Republican group supporting GOP candidate Mitt Romney, alone spent $25 million in May, much of it in attack ads directed against President Barack Obama.
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