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Atrial Fibrillation

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HEALTH
January 18, 2010
Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm. While it primarily affects people over 65 years old, it can be seen in all age groups, says Dr. Monica Aggarwal, a cardiologist from the Heart Center at Mercy Medical Center. •Atrial fibrillation is a rhythm that is faster and more erratic than our normal heart rhythm. It causes decreased blood flow to the rest of the body and leads to blood pooling in the heart, which can lead to clot formation. Smaller clots can break off this thrombus, travel to the brain and cause a stroke.
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NEWS
January 18, 2010
Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm. While it primarily affects people over 65 years old, it can be seen in all age groups, says Dr. Monica Aggarwal, a cardiologist from the Heart Center at Mercy Medical Center. Atrial fibrillation is a rhythm that is faster and more erratic than our normal heart rhythm. It causes decreased blood flow to the rest of the body and leads to blood pooling in the heart, which can lead to clot formation. Smaller clots can break off this thrombus, travel to the brain and cause a stroke.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 26, 1991
Q: My doctor did an electrocardiogram last week and told me I have atrial fibrillation. What is this? Is it dangerous?A: Blood is pumped from the heart by contraction of its two lower (ventricular) chambers. These ventricular contractions are normally preceded by contractions of the two atrial (upper) chambers and triggered by regular electrical signals from the upper chambers. Atrial fibrillation is weak, uncoordinated twitching of the atrial muscle that replaces theusual atrial contractions.
NEWS
November 30, 2009
Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the United States each year, writes Dr. Paul Lucas, director of the Vascular Laboratory at Mercy Medical Center. It's the second-leading cause of cardiovascular death and the most common cause of death as a result of neurological disorders. Approximately one out of every eight strokes is preceded by a transient ischemic attack, or TIA. This is a warning stroke of sorts. Lucas discusses how to recognize such an attack, and what to do about it. A TIA, by definition, is a medical term for a group of neurological symptoms - for instance weakness or numbness - which appears suddenly and then resolves completely within 24 hours.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
Millions of Americans experience atrial fibrillation every year, but doctors have never been able to determine precisely why an apparently healthy heart like President Bush's would suddenly stumble into arrhythmia after beating normally for 66 years."
NEWS
By New York Times | May 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Doctors found cause for elation and concern when President Bush's heartbeat finally settled into a normal pattern after two long episodes of atrial fibrillation.The fact that drugs alone could produce and maintain normal rhythm for a number of hours makes it unlikely that the president will need an electrical shock to reset his heart. But the fact that the president's irregular heart rhythm was unusually resistant to medicines raises the odds that the rhythm will recur and that he will need drug therapy for months, maybe longer.
NEWS
May 7, 1991
George Bush is not the only one to experience an abnormal heartbeat due to atrial fibrillation. The ailment is fairly common, doctors say, striking 1.5 million to 2 million Americans a year.And while the president's doctors describe his arrhythmia as "benign," atrial fibrillation sometimes has serious consequences. Characterized in medical literature as "rapid, random contractions of the upper chambers of the heart, resulting in a totally irregular, often rapid heart rate," atrial fibrillation can be caused by infection, heart disease, or even ordinary stress.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | May 5, 1991
Doctors said yesterday that President Bush suffered common irregularity of the heart that, given his history of vigor and good health, probably does not signal a life-threatening illness or a condition that will force him to slow his pace.Experts in heart disease cautioned that the condition, known as atrial fibrillation, is common in people with a serious underlying heart disorder such as a leaky heart valve.But they said that when it strikes people like the president, who keep an active pace and have never reported chest pains or other symptoms of a serious abnormality, it usually is a relatively harmless condition that can be managed effectively with drugs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | May 6, 1991
Doctors were pursuing a textbook -- albeit, trial-and-error -- approach yesterday to restoring President Bush's normal heart rhythm, the last step of which could be delivering an electric shock to his chest if drugs fail to work, experts said.Shocking the heart is a low-risk procedure that doctors frequently elect to use when patients fail to respond to drug therapy, physicians said. And in most cases, they said, the technique works."In almost everybody like him who is in atrial fibrillation for the first time, [electric shock]
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Smiling and ruddy-cheeked, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski returned to work yesterday after a hospital stay and diagnosis of an irregular heartbeat last week. The Maryland Democrat, who turns 69 tomorrow, was hospitalized for tests after complaining of feeling tired. Doctors at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore diagnosed atrial fibrillation and Mikulski was put on medication to control it. After returning to the Senate floor yesterday evening, Mikulski said she is feeling much better after of weeks of struggling to muster her usual energy.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | September 8, 2006
I'm going to have to swim in the Potomac," said Woodstock resident Ken Cornell, who is training for the Nation's Triathlon on Sept. 16 in Washington. "I'm not too thrilled with that." What is thrilling, however, is how far the 46-year-old Cornell has come since spring 2001. While on vacation in Ireland with his son, Matthew, and his wife, Karin, Cornell started experiencing an irregular heartbeat. "I felt like my heart was skipping a beat, but I didn't want to ruin the vacation," he said.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Smiling and ruddy-cheeked, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski returned to work yesterday after a hospital stay and diagnosis of an irregular heartbeat last week. The Maryland Democrat, who turns 69 tomorrow, was hospitalized for tests after complaining of feeling tired. Doctors at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore diagnosed atrial fibrillation and Mikulski was put on medication to control it. After returning to the Senate floor yesterday evening, Mikulski said she is feeling much better after of weeks of struggling to muster her usual energy.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski was released from Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore yesterday after treatment for an irregular heartbeat, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Democrat said. Mikulski, who will turn 69 on Wednesday, was admitted to the hospital Monday after complaining of feeling tired. Her doctor ordered tests, and the heart problem - atrial fibrillation - was discovered, spokeswoman Melissa Schwartz said. Mikulski will be back at work Monday, Schwartz said. The condition is treatable with medication, and Mikulski should be able to maintain her regular schedule, according to a statement released by her office.
FEATURES
By Marie McCullough and Marie McCullough,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 1996
Hope is growing that the damage caused by a stroke may soon be minimized -- or even averted.Instead of standing by, almost powerless to intervene as stroke injures the brain, physicians will be able to give medications that protect the brain and restore vital blood flow.The first emergency drug for strokes caused by blood clots was approved in June by the federal Food and Drug Administration. The drug is called tissue plasminogen activator, or TPA. Dozens of other drugs are now in testing.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Jason LaCanfora and Buster Olney and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Diana K. Sugg contributed to this article | August 23, 1996
Orioles manager Davey Johnson, suffering from an irregular heartbeat, checked into St. Joseph Medical Center yesterday and missed last night's game, but he is expected to return to his duties tonight.Johnson fell because of dizziness at his home yesterday morning and went to the Heart Institute at St. Joseph shortly thereafter for a series of tests that revealed a case of atrial fibrillation -- essentially the same problem that bothered Orioles pitcher David Wells in spring training, according to team doctor William Goldiner.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | May 7, 1991
Apart from the natural concerns about President Bush's health, the episode of abnormal heart rhythm that began during his Saturday afternoon run at Camp David may have struck fear in the hearts of other joggers: Can it happen to me? And is it likely to lead to sudden death?The answers, from experts in heart disease, are "yes" to the first, and "no" to the second."If the heart is normal, atrial fibrillation is benign, short-lived and doesn't hamper the ability to do normal activities and go back to exercise," says Dr. Rick Veltri, director of cardiology at Sinai Hospital.
NEWS
November 30, 2009
Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the United States each year, writes Dr. Paul Lucas, director of the Vascular Laboratory at Mercy Medical Center. It's the second-leading cause of cardiovascular death and the most common cause of death as a result of neurological disorders. Approximately one out of every eight strokes is preceded by a transient ischemic attack, or TIA. This is a warning stroke of sorts. Lucas discusses how to recognize such an attack, and what to do about it. A TIA, by definition, is a medical term for a group of neurological symptoms - for instance weakness or numbness - which appears suddenly and then resolves completely within 24 hours.
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