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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer yFB | April 16, 1992
Maryland farmers will be asked this year to reduce their use of a popular but toxic weed killer that is showing up in drinking water and Chesapeake Bay, state agriculture officials say.The Maryland Department of Agriculture, which regulates farm chemicals, is preparing voluntary guidelines for farmers on how they can cut back application of the herbicide atrazine.The guidelines are being drafted with the help of Ciba-Geigy Corp., the chemical's leading producer. The firm has proposed nationwide restrictions on atrazine and educational programs such as the one planned in Maryland to try to reduce contamination.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Male smallmouth bass with female traits have turned up in the Susquehanna River, the second major Chesapeake Bay tributary where "intersex" fish have been detected. A federal scientist said Tuesday she's investigating whether the abnormality could be linked to farm or consumer chemicals getting into the river. More than 90 percent of adult male bass examined in the Susquehanna in the past year had immature egg cells in their testes, said Vicki Blazer, a fishery biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency is embroiled in several fierce legal and scientific debates as it struggles to write new rules governing the use of atrazine, one of the nation's most widely used herbicides. The chemical, used to banish weeds from cornfields in the Midwest and residential lawns in the Southeast, has been linked in studies to cancer in humans and to deformities in frogs that caused them to grow both testes and ovaries. It is banned in some European countries.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
As birds sang in blossoming pear trees outside the McGinnis farmhouse in northern Baltimore County, a tanker truck with a 75-foot-wide boom rumbled across the family's fields, spraying chemicals. The nozzles were shooting phosphorus to fertilize the cornfield. In a few days, workers plan to make a second pass to spray atrazine, a herbicide that kills thistle and other weeds that sprout between rows. About 75 percent of American corn farmers over the past half-century have made a springtime ritual out of spraying atrazine, using about 70 million pounds every year as a labor-saving alternative to tilling to remove weeds.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
As birds sang in blossoming pear trees outside the McGinnis farmhouse in northern Baltimore County, a tanker truck with a 75-foot-wide boom rumbled across the family's fields, spraying chemicals. The nozzles were shooting phosphorus to fertilize the cornfield. In a few days, workers plan to make a second pass to spray atrazine, a herbicide that kills thistle and other weeds that sprout between rows. About 75 percent of American corn farmers over the past half-century have made a springtime ritual out of spraying atrazine, using about 70 million pounds every year as a labor-saving alternative to tilling to remove weeds.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Army investigators have concluded that traces of the herbicide atrazine found in the wells of eight Odenton families last year did not come from Fort Meade's sanitary landfill.The Army tested 27 wells in April that monitor ground water and sampled the soil in 25 spots around the Active Sanitary Land Fill on Fort Meade. The samples detected atrazine, a suspected carcinogen, at less than 3 parts per billion -- a level federal guidelines deem safe for drinking water, said Scott A. Hill, an environmental engineer with the U.S. Army Environmental Center Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
Maryland farmers will be asked this year to reduce their use of a popular but toxic weed killer that is showing up in drinking water and the Chesapeake Bay, state agriculture officials say.The Maryland Department of Agriculture, which regulates farm chemicals, is preparing voluntary guidelines for farmers on how they can cut back application of the herbicide atrazine.The guidelines are being drafted with the help of Ciba-Geigy Corp., the chemical's leading producer. The firm has proposed nationwide restrictions on atrazine and educational programs such as the one planned in Maryland to try to reduce contamination.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
An environmental group sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Baltimore yesterday, seeking a ban on the nation's most widely used herbicide -- a weed killer they say is polluting the Chesapeake Bay and other major waterways. The National Resources Defense Council says that up to 70 million pounds of atrazine -- banned in several European countries -- may be causing untold environmental damage by being applied to lawns, golf courses and farms because much of it ends up flowing into the nation's rivers, streams and other bodies of water.
NEWS
August 24, 2003
FROGS HAVE been trying to tell us something for quite a while now. Each spring there seem to be fewer of them, while increasingly those that do appear are severely deformed; no legs, extra legs, a double set of reproductive equipment. Part of nature's early warning system, frogs are sounding the alarm that they and many other creatures - possibly including humans - are being poisoned in ecosystems all over the world. Studies suggest at least part of the damage is caused by fertilizers and pesticides used on golf courses, farm fields and well-manicured suburban lawns.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Andrea F. Siegel and Katherine Richards and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | December 2, 1994
Eight Odenton families whose wells have been contaminated with weed killer will be hooked up to public water supplies at no charge, county officials said yesterday.The county will waive the $4,650 public water hookup fee for each family and will pay the plumbing costs of connecting the homes to the water main, said Lisa Ritter, a spokeswoman for the county land use office, yesterday.The county also will expedite the hookup process, which can take up to two months, and that could put the families on public water by the end of the year.
NEWS
September 1, 2003
Activist attacks on key herbicide seem ill-founded The Sun's editorial supporting the activist-driven lawsuit against the agricultural herbicide atrazine was ill-considered ("Risky business" Aug. 24). The supposed threat of death or deformity to frogs from atrazine has been suggested (not proved) by only one researcher. Two independent university research groups have been unable to replicate these results. Replication is the foundation of science. While Maryland is home to at least 20 frog and toad species and its farmers apply roughly half a million pounds of atrazine each year, not one of these species is endangered and there is scant evidence of any problems.
NEWS
August 24, 2003
FROGS HAVE been trying to tell us something for quite a while now. Each spring there seem to be fewer of them, while increasingly those that do appear are severely deformed; no legs, extra legs, a double set of reproductive equipment. Part of nature's early warning system, frogs are sounding the alarm that they and many other creatures - possibly including humans - are being poisoned in ecosystems all over the world. Studies suggest at least part of the damage is caused by fertilizers and pesticides used on golf courses, farm fields and well-manicured suburban lawns.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
An environmental group sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Baltimore yesterday, seeking a ban on the nation's most widely used herbicide -- a weed killer they say is polluting the Chesapeake Bay and other major waterways. The National Resources Defense Council says that up to 70 million pounds of atrazine -- banned in several European countries -- may be causing untold environmental damage by being applied to lawns, golf courses and farms because much of it ends up flowing into the nation's rivers, streams and other bodies of water.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency is embroiled in several fierce legal and scientific debates as it struggles to write new rules governing the use of atrazine, one of the nation's most widely used herbicides. The chemical, used to banish weeds from cornfields in the Midwest and residential lawns in the Southeast, has been linked in studies to cancer in humans and to deformities in frogs that caused them to grow both testes and ovaries. It is banned in some European countries.
NEWS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | April 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - Male frogs exposed to very low doses of a common weed killer can develop multiple sex organs - sometimes both male and female - researchers in California have discovered. "I was very much surprised," at the effect on developing frogs of atrazine, an herbicide used on crops and city weeds, said Tyrone B. Hayes of the University of California at Berkeley. Atrazine is the most commonly used weed killer in North America. Farmers on the Eastern Shore and across the country spray it on corn.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Army investigators have concluded that traces of the herbicide atrazine found in the wells of eight Odenton families last year did not come from Fort Meade's sanitary landfill.The Army tested 27 wells in April that monitor ground water and sampled the soil in 25 spots around the Active Sanitary Land Fill on Fort Meade. The samples detected atrazine, a suspected carcinogen, at less than 3 parts per billion -- a level federal guidelines deem safe for drinking water, said Scott A. Hill, an environmental engineer with the U.S. Army Environmental Center Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | October 28, 1994
Now that the herbicide atrazine has been found at unsafe levels in five private wells along Old Waugh Chapel Road in Odenton, residents want to know what federal and state officials are going to do about it.About 70 people, including civic leaders and political candidates, attended a public meeting last night organized by state Del. Marsha G. Perry at the Arundel Middle School to hear experts from the Maryland Department of the Environment, Fort Meade, the...
NEWS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | April 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - Male frogs exposed to very low doses of a common weed killer can develop multiple sex organs - sometimes both male and female - researchers in California have discovered. "I was very much surprised," at the effect on developing frogs of atrazine, an herbicide used on crops and city weeds, said Tyrone B. Hayes of the University of California at Berkeley. Atrazine is the most commonly used weed killer in North America. Farmers on the Eastern Shore and across the country spray it on corn.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Andrea F. Siegel and Katherine Richards and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | December 2, 1994
Eight Odenton families whose wells have been contaminated with weed killer will be hooked up to public water supplies at no charge, county officials said yesterday.The county will waive the $4,650 public water hookup fee for each family and will pay the plumbing costs of connecting the homes to the water main, said Lisa Ritter, a spokeswoman for the county land use office, yesterday.The county also will expedite the hookup process, which can take up to two months, and that could put the families on public water by the end of the year.
NEWS
November 28, 1994
Twenty-four years ago, Harold and Carol Lehtma bought a home on Old Waugh Chapel Road in Odenton, believing its rural setting made it an ideal place to raise their two children. Now, the Lehtmas have learned that the water they have been drinking is polluted with a weed killer.State and federal officials are trying to find out how the herbicide atrazine got into the Lehtmas' well and the water supply of several of their neighbors. Tests on the Lehtma well showed that the level of atrazine present was more than 8 parts per billion; federal guidelines say drinking water should contain less than 3 parts per billion.
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