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By ELISE ARMACOST | August 6, 1995
Fifty years ago today, Navy Chief Warrant Officer Ken Freed was aboard the USS Bingham, on his way back to the States with a bloody cargo of men injured in the battle for Okinawa, when the news crackled over the ship's radio network: The United States had dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima.At 77, the Annapolis resident remembers clearly what he felt, what every man on the Bingham felt: "Relief. Anything to end the war."No one anguished over the rightness or wrongness of the act. No one wondered in frightened awe at the dawning of the nuclear age. No one thought of the sufferings of the civilians who at that moment were dying and burning and grieving over the immolation of their world.
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NEWS
December 2, 2013
I fully support diplomatic efforts to curtail Iran's nuclear programs, especially if it eliminates their efforts to produce an atomic bomb ("The nuclear deal with Iran," Nov. 25). However, I doubt that we can trust the word of Iran on this issue. What seems to be missing here is an additional effort to stop Iran from funding and helping terrorist groups. I think that changing their policy of wishing harm on Israel and other countries should be part of any agreement. This encouragement of terrorists is just as harmful to world peace.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1994
LONDON -- A Soviet spy chief's memoir published here claims that the late J. Robert Oppenheimer, head of the U.S. atomic bomb project during and after World War II, passed nuclear secrets to Soviet agents.The allegations were made by Gen. Pavel Sudoplatov, who was in charge of efforts to obtain atomic secrets from the West, and excerpts of them ran in the Sunday Telegraph. Time magazine will print excerpts of the book in today's issue.The memoir charges that Dr. Oppenheimer, a University of California physicist known as the "father of the atomic bomb," condoned and assisted in the flow of vital nuclear secrets.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 17, 2011
Thomas Fulton, a longtime physics professor at the Johns Hopkins University who swapped notes with the great minds of science, died of heart failure on April 8 at his daughter's home in Ruxton. He was 83. Born Tamas Feuerzeug, in Budapest, Hungary, he immigrated to the United States with his family in 1941 at the age of 14. His immediate family fled Nazis in Hungary and Germany, where many of his other family members died in the Holocaust, and traveled to fascist Spain, where he secured three boat tickets to Cuba by borrowing $100 from a British consular official.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 16, 1993
As tears rolled down her cheeks, the woman from Hiroshima told an audience at the New Windsor Service Center about the survivors of the atomic blast that leveled her city in 1945.Nobuko Taguchi, 21, is one of three women from the World Friendship Center in Hiroshima carrying a message of peace to the United States.She apologized for crying and spoke softly of Morihisa Shimomura, whose parents survived the atomic bomb attack on Aug. 6, 1945, but died shortly after his birth from "the atomic sickness."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Edward Henry Schneider Jr., a retired Baltimore City engineer and founder of a Lutheran congregation, died of a stroke Tuesday at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville, he attended Hamilton Junior High School and was a 1935 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He worked at the Locke Insulator Co. in South Baltimore while earning his civil engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he was assigned to a post classified as secret.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
The former director of the National Air & Space Museum seems at peace with the memory of his own head on a platter. Martin Harwit served it at his boss' request, resigning after a long dispute over a planned exhibit about the atomic bombings of Japan.Some of his adversaries publicly applauded his downfall, others were content to claim a customary spoil of victory: the power to have history told their way.Harwit, an astrophysicist by profession, went home to Washington, disappointed but not bitter.
NEWS
October 21, 2006
ALVIN WEINBERG, 91 Helped develop A-bomb Alvin Weinberg, a former Oak Ridge National Laboratory director who helped develop the technology behind the atomic bomb, died Wednesday at his home. Active until recently, he died of natural causes, according to Martin Oak Ridge Funeral Home. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Mr. Weinberg helped develop the technology behind the atomic bomb in the 1940s at the University of Chicago and came to Oak Ridge in 1945 to work for Clinton Laboratories, later to become Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as part of the Manhattan Project.
NEWS
February 9, 2003
Shigeo Sasaki, 87, whose daughter was an atomic bomb victim who became famous for the paper cranes she folded, died Tuesday in Tokyo of a brain tumor. Mr. Sasaki devoted his life to campaigning for peace after his 12-year-old daughter Sadako died in 1955 of radiation-related leukemia that she developed after the United States dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima 10 years earlier. Mr. Sasaki, a barber from Hiroshima, retold her story to school children around the nation. Sadako made cranes on her hospital bed, inspired by a Japanese legend that says anyone who makes 1,000 paper cranes would be granted a wish.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
Norris Bradbury, 88, the physicist who assembled the first atomic bomb and headed the Los Alamos nuclear laboratory for 25 years of the Cold War, died Wednesday at his home in Los Alamos, N.M.Bradbury joined the Manhattan Project in 1944 and led the team charged with assembling the non-nuclear components for the world's first atomic bomb explosion. That explosion, on July 16, 1945, at Trinity Site in New Mexico, set up the bombing of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki the next month.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 20, 2010
William J. Evitts, a noted writer, editor and historian who was a former college professor, died Dec. 14 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 68. The son of a U.S. Department of Labor official and a homemaker, Dr. Evitts was born in Chicago and raised in Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Washington and Lee High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1964 from the Johns Hopkins University and was a Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Virginia, where he earned a master's degree in 1966.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Edward Henry Schneider Jr., a retired Baltimore City engineer and founder of a Lutheran congregation, died of a stroke Tuesday at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville, he attended Hamilton Junior High School and was a 1935 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He worked at the Locke Insulator Co. in South Baltimore while earning his civil engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he was assigned to a post classified as secret.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Charles F. Burrows, a metallurgist engineer who helped build the first warplane to drop an atomic bomb, died Oct. 25 at College Manor after suffering a fall at his home a month ago. The Timonium resident was 93. A specialist in metal coatings and finishes, he held patents used on kitchenware, airplanes and medical equipment. Born in Cleveland, Mr. Burrows earned a bachelor's degree in metallurgical engineering at Case Institute of Technology, where he also earned a master's degree in the same field.
NEWS
October 21, 2006
ALVIN WEINBERG, 91 Helped develop A-bomb Alvin Weinberg, a former Oak Ridge National Laboratory director who helped develop the technology behind the atomic bomb, died Wednesday at his home. Active until recently, he died of natural causes, according to Martin Oak Ridge Funeral Home. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Mr. Weinberg helped develop the technology behind the atomic bomb in the 1940s at the University of Chicago and came to Oak Ridge in 1945 to work for Clinton Laboratories, later to become Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as part of the Manhattan Project.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 9, 2005
ROUGHLY THREE decades ago, when Jerry Beser was a student at Pikesville High School, his history teacher delivered a lecture about the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The teacher said there were no survivors from the crews of the two American bombers. "All the men died," the teacher said, "because they were so consumed by guilt." Jerry Beser raised his hand and declared, "Nobody told my father that." His father was Jacob Beser, who lived without guilt or apology for many years thereafter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2005
ATOMIC BOMB Shockwave: Countdown to Hiroshima By Stephen Walker. HarperCollins. 352 pages. It's easy to forget that, as cities go, Hiroshima was ordinary. People there lived without any special foreboding and experienced everything in normal, rich colors, not the grainy black-and-white of World War II newsreels. Unless you believe that long chains of circumstances are actually part of some higher power's detailed master plan, there was nothing inevitable about Hiroshima's becoming the first city to be destroyed by an atomic bomb.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
SUITLAND -- An unheated, poorly lighted warehouse along a rundown commercial strip seems an unlikely place to find the world's most famous warplane. Yet here the immense bomber's fuselage lies in two pieces without wings or landing gear, not seen publicly in one piece since it dropped the first atomic bomb.Visitors stepping into Building 20 at the National Air and Space Museum's storage and restoration yard encounter first the giant bullet nose of the B-29 Superfortress, looming in dim light like a submarine.
NEWS
July 12, 2000
Charles Alan Wright, 72, an authority on constitutional law and the federal courts who represented President Richard Nixon at a crucial moment in the Watergate scandal, died Friday at the North Austin Medical Center in Texas. The cause was complications after recent lung surgery, his family said. As a special legal consultant to Nixon in summer 1973, he argued unsuccessfully that the constitutional separation of powers between the executive and judicial branches protected the president from turning over White House tape recordings to the special prosecutor, Archibald Cox. Eventually, the tapes helped prove the extent of the conspiracy to obstruct justice and led to the president's resignation.
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