Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAtomic
IN THE NEWS

Atomic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 25, 2009
Dr. Jack Sugar, a noted retired atomic physicist whose career with the National Institute of Standards and Technology spanned more than three decades, died Aug. 15 from complications of Parkinson's disease at the Hebrew Home of Greater Washington in Rockville. He was 79. Born in Baltimore, the son of a furrier and homemaker, he was raised on Linden Avenue, and graduated in 1948 from Polytechnic Institute. He earned a degree in physics from the Johns Hopkins University in 1951. He later earned both a master's and Ph.D.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 9, 1990
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- The son of former Gov. Scott M. Matheson believes the open-air atomic testing whose dangers his father fought to expose caused the cancer that killed him.Matheson died Sunday at age 61 of multiple myeloma. He lived in Cedar City in the early 1950s when the government conducted dozens of above-ground tests 300 miles away in Nevada that caused radioactive fallout to drift into Utah.As governor from 1977 to 1985, Matheson fought to expose the dangers of those tests and gain compensation for radiation victims -- an effort that succeeded with the passage by Congress last week of a compensation bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | November 6, 2013
For the past few years, Atomic Books owner Benn Ray envisioned one day transforming the back area of his Hampden bookstore from a record store into a cafe. And instead of serving coffee, the bar would sell beer and wine. “I like the idea of being able to buy a book or a magazine or a comic, sitting some place and having a decent local or craft beer, and reading something,” Ray, who created the “Said What?” comic that runs in b , said over the phone last week. “Essentially, it was building a space I'd want to be in.” In late August, Ray's vision became reality when Eightbar opened.
NEWS
By Roger Tatarian | June 20, 1994
PATRICK Buchanan, the columnist and sometimes candidate for president, is all agog over Pavel Sudoplatov, a former KGB agent who claims firsthand knowledge of Soviet espionage into U.S. atomic secrets.Mr. Sudoplatov is the principal author of a recently published book titled "Special Tasks: The Memoirs of an Unwanted Soviet Spymaster." The book alleges that key scientists in making the U.S. atom bomb -- J. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard and Neils Bohr -- had passed crucial information on to the Soviet Union during World War II.The Sudoplatov book has raised a lot of eyebrows, but not Pat Buchanan's.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1995
Bowing to pressure from veteran's organizations and members of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution agreed yesterday to junk its upcoming exhibit on the atomic bombings of Japan and instead mount a simple display of the B-29 Enola Gay at the National Air and Space Museum.Smithsonian Secretary I. Michael Heyman said in a news conference in Washington that "we made a basic error in attempting to couple an historical treatment of the use of atomic weapons with the 50th anniversary commemoration of the end of the war."
NEWS
By CHRIS KRIDLER | July 16, 1995
Fifty years ago today, on July 16, 1945, the United States exploded the first atomic bomb. It wasn't over Hiroshima or Nagasaki, but in New Mexico. And somehow, the cause of this brilliant light, this enormous blast, remained a secret until the end of World War II.It wasn't the first secret of the war, by any means. And atomic secrecy was such a habit by war's end that it continued for years afterward. Most journalists willingly obliged; physicists, whose discoveries had sprung from freedom of information before the war, found their avenues of communication shut off; and any American without a security clearance lacked the facts necessary to learn to guide such a terrifying force.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 5, 1994
As part of a national program to evaluate the potential hazards of radioactive fallout from atomic bomb tests, the government's nuclear weapons industry sanctioned research in the 1950s that involved chemically analyzing the cremated remains of stillborn babies.The research, in which ashes of the stillborns and of miscarried fetuses were studied for concentrations of radioactive strontium, was conducted at the University of Chicago in 1953 and 1954 under the guidance of Dr. Willard F. Libby.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 1, 1992
MOSCOW -- Newly published documents confirm that Soviet spies successfully penetrated the U.S. atomic-bomb program during World War II and obtained information that was of great use to Soviet scientists in their drive to produce a nuclear weapon.The documents, which were published yesterday in the latest edition of the weekly newspaper Moscow News, make no mention of the identities of the Soviet agents.They therefore shed no light on the greatest unresolved controversy of that period: the guilt or innocence of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, two American Communists who were convicted in 1950 of passing atomic secrets to the Soviets during the war and executed.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder | July 9, 1991
Posses using helicopters and airplanes are searching vast stretches of New Mexico for a most unusual fugitive -- a radioactive goat on the lam for two months.Dubbed "The Atomic Goat," the animal escaped during one of those federal experiments that seemed like a good idea at the time. Luckily for it, but unhappily for the searchers, it does not glow in the dark."We haven't seen it or heard from it in a long time," said Mike Fall, a researcher at the Denver Wildlife Research Center.The animal is one of 62 Angora goats fitted with collars holding radioactive isotopes and radio transmitters.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Nolen Strals is holding his head in his hand. It is gold and palm-sized, made of finely ribbed plastic. But there, unmistakably, are Strals' thoughtful brow, the pinch of his nose, smoothly sloped forehead. The bust was not crafted by a sculptor or mass-produced in a factory in China, but issued from a 3-D printer at Atomic Books. The Hampden bookstore recently became among the first places in the area where customers can walk in and get objects printed - sort of a photocopy shop for the 21st century.
NEWS
By Dan Ervin | May 6, 2013
Companies supplying components for the nuclear power industry are located throughout the United States, including a number in Maryland. These manufacturing firms have developed businesses providing components and equipment required for the maintenance and upkeep of the 104 operating reactors in the U.S. Unfortunately for them, the domestic market is expanding at a very low rate. Currently in the U.S., ground has been broken for five new reactors. These supplying firms would benefit if allowed to participate in the growing international market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Eighteen months ago, Baltimore post-punk heroes Double Dagger played its final show at the Ottobar. But the trio of Nolen Strals, Denny Bowen and Bruce Willen aren't finished celebrating the band's career. On April 20 - internationally known as Record Store Day, which falls on the third Saturday in April each year - Double Dagger will host a free record release party at Hampden's Atomic Books . The trio is releasing its final album, a hard-hitting EP called "333," along with a documentary called "If We Shout Loud Enough" that follows the band on its final tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Every April 1, the owners of Hampden's Atomic Books do some sort of prank. Yesterday, the popular book and record store upheld tradition by announcing a planned expansion that will include a bar called Dead Poets Society. The prank, according to co-owner Benn Ray, was only the name of the bar ("We wouldn't name it that"). The expansion, including a new bar, is true. Ray says he and other owner Rachel Whang had considered expanding Atomic Books for the past two years. "Once the economy stablized and turned back around, we thought we might be able to expand and move forward," Ray said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Federal regulators denied a license Thursday to the French-controlled company for a proposed third nuclear reactor at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland, giving the company 60 days to find a U.S. partner. At the end of those 60 days, the three judges of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board wrote, they would be forced to terminate the company's application proceedings entirely. The decision follows warnings from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in April 2011 that UniStar Nuclear Energy, which is owned by Electricite de France, is not eligible to control the proposed $9.6 billion Calvert Cliffs 3 project under its current ownership structure.
NEWS
August 8, 2012
This week marks the 67th anniversary of the dropping of atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Given the fact that 100 million Japanese were prepared to fight to the death to defend their homeland, most historians believe that President Harry Truman made the correct decision to use these weapons. Predictions of one million American and several million Japanese casualties occurring during an invasion of Japan certainly influenced Truman's thinking. A more intriguing question is whether the same decision to use weapons of mass destruction would have been made with regard to Germany.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1999
John R. Dam, a chemist who helped produce the plutonium used in the development of the atomic bomb during World War II, died Monday of heart failure at the Vantage House retirement facility in Columbia. He was 78.Born and raised in Kalamazoo, Mich., Mr. Dam graduated from Kalamazoo College in 1943 with a bachelor's degree. While pursuing a master's degree in chemistry at the University of Chicago, he became involved with a group of scientists working under the bleachers at Stagg Field to isolate plutonium that was used in experiments that produced the first self-sustaining nuclear reaction.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 15, 1995
On July 16, 1945, the atomic bomb was tested successfully at Alamogordo, N.M. On Aug. 6, 1945, at 8:16 a.m., the B-29 bomber Enola Gay dropped an atom bomb on Hiroshima. Three days later, another one was dropped on Nagasaki. On July 29 of the same year, between the test and the bombings, Peter d'Agostino was born in New York.D'Agostino, now a professor in the school of communications and theater at Temple University in Philadelphia and a widely acclaimed video artist, has a sense of identity with the events of those weeks 50 years ago because of the coincidence of his birth.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Federal regulators plan a hearing Jan. 26 on a challenge to a French company's bid to build a third reactor at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant, and will take public comments the day before. The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board will air contentions by four anti-nuclear groups that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has not adequately weighed alternatives to building the facility. The hearing begins at 9:30 a.m. in the Albright Building, 205 Main St. in Prince Frederick.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.