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NEWS
May 27, 1996
Alexander Langsdorf Jr., 83, a physicist who worked on the team that developed the atom bomb and later spoke in opposition to the weapon, died Friday in Chicago from complications from hip surgery. He worked with Enrico Fermi at the University of Chicago on the Manhattan Project, which resulted in the development of the bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of World War II. Mr. Langsdorf's contribution to the bomb was a speck of plutonium that he produced from a cyclotron, an atomic-particle splitter developed at Washington University in St. Louis.
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NEWS
August 13, 2012
I was initially elated that a letter writer had remembered the anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ("The atomic age turns 67,"Aug. 9). But elation turned to disappointment as the author went on to recite the myth, perpetrated by Harry Truman and Gen. Leslie Groves, that "100 million Japanese were prepared to fight to the death to defend their homeland," and that "most historians believe that President Harry Truman made the correct decision to use these weapons.
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NEWS
April 18, 1995
John Kuranz, 73, a physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project that developed the atom bomb, died Friday in an airplane collision in Oshkosh, Wis. After working at the University of Chicago on the atom bomb, Mr. Kuranz witnessed the first explosion of a nuclear device at White Sands, N.M. After World War II, he was one of the founders and vice presidents of Nuclear Chicago Corp., a firm that applied nuclear physics to medicine. The company now is a part of Siemens.Spencer T. Olin, 96, a former executive of munitions maker Olin Corp.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2010
Edward Henry Schneider Jr., a retired Baltimore City engineer and founder of a Lutheran congregation, died of a stroke Tuesday at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 93. Born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville, he attended Hamilton Junior High School and was a 1935 Polytechnic Institute graduate. He worked at the Locke Insulator Co. in South Baltimore while earning his civil engineering degree at the Johns Hopkins University. During World War II, he was assigned to a post classified as secret.
NEWS
August 13, 2012
I was initially elated that a letter writer had remembered the anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ("The atomic age turns 67,"Aug. 9). But elation turned to disappointment as the author went on to recite the myth, perpetrated by Harry Truman and Gen. Leslie Groves, that "100 million Japanese were prepared to fight to the death to defend their homeland," and that "most historians believe that President Harry Truman made the correct decision to use these weapons.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | December 12, 1994
Boston -- You would think that the folks at the post office had enough on their minds, shoulders and backs this time of year without adding a mushroom cloud to their burdens.But right in the middle of the holiday season, they dropped a bomb on the public. They announced that the stamp designed to commemorate the end of World War II would carry the image of the A-Bomb exploding over Japan.I am not sure exactly what public they had in mind. It's unlikely that the average American would post a birthday card or a love letter with an atom bomb in the corner.
NEWS
By Chiaki Kawajiri | December 24, 1995
FIFTY YEARS have passed since the end of World War II, and many people still talk as though Japan is still the worst enemy.Growing up in Japan, the history of World War II hurt me deeply. I felt sad for my countrymen knowing many were killed and the nation was destroyed. At the same time, I felt guilty about the way the Japanese treated others. Even though Japanese textbooks didn't cover these issues, I learned early what really happened during those years.Coming to the United States in 1987 at age 23 and meeting the non-Japanese people who were also victims was an affirmation of the tragedy of the war. And it was real.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 13, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- "All the worlds are fear-struck, even just as I am." Those words from the Bhagavad Gita, sung by the chorus in John Adams' new opera, Doctor Atomic, register with the musical and theatrical force you would expect in a work about the Manhattan Project's awesome progeny. Not all of this ambitious opera proves so indelible, but it contains lots of fissionable elements. In an age of minisecond attention spans, superficial news and scant respect for the lessons of history, Doctor Atomic takes a firm stand for serious ideas and ideals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The Iraqi interim government has warned the United States and international nuclear inspectors that nearly 380 tons of powerful conventional explosives - used to demolish buildings, produce missile warheads and detonate nuclear weapons - are missing from one of Iraq's most sensitive former military installations. The huge facility, called Al Qaqaa, was supposed to be under U.S. military control but is now a no-man's land, still picked over by looters as recently as yesterday.
NEWS
April 1, 1995
Fifty years ago today [apr. 1] the last battle of World War II began. It was also the bloodiest of all the Pacific battles. It was also the most influential in a sense, because of a later momentous event it was in large part responsible for.The battle was the U.S. invasion of Okinawa. Okinawa was the largest of a string of islands the Japanese had annexed in the 19th century. It was only 350 miles from the Japanese home island of Kyushu. Thus control of it meant a fleet harbor, a staging area for huge numbers of troops and airfields for bombers on the very threshold of Japan.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Charles F. Burrows, a metallurgist engineer who helped build the first warplane to drop an atomic bomb, died Oct. 25 at College Manor after suffering a fall at his home a month ago. The Timonium resident was 93. A specialist in metal coatings and finishes, he held patents used on kitchenware, airplanes and medical equipment. Born in Cleveland, Mr. Burrows earned a bachelor's degree in metallurgical engineering at Case Institute of Technology, where he also earned a master's degree in the same field.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 13, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- "All the worlds are fear-struck, even just as I am." Those words from the Bhagavad Gita, sung by the chorus in John Adams' new opera, Doctor Atomic, register with the musical and theatrical force you would expect in a work about the Manhattan Project's awesome progeny. Not all of this ambitious opera proves so indelible, but it contains lots of fissionable elements. In an age of minisecond attention spans, superficial news and scant respect for the lessons of history, Doctor Atomic takes a firm stand for serious ideas and ideals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 25, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The Iraqi interim government has warned the United States and international nuclear inspectors that nearly 380 tons of powerful conventional explosives - used to demolish buildings, produce missile warheads and detonate nuclear weapons - are missing from one of Iraq's most sensitive former military installations. The huge facility, called Al Qaqaa, was supposed to be under U.S. military control but is now a no-man's land, still picked over by looters as recently as yesterday.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2003
WASHINGTON - Geiger counters crackle continuously in a low, ominous mutter as you move through the replica of the first atomic bomb laboratory that sculptor Jim Sanborn has created at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art. Oscilloscopes hum and flicker blue dancing lines that move across the screens like lunging fencers. Sanborn has re-created almost exactly the work tables where scientists of the Manhattan Project moved uranium and plutonium closer and closer to the critical mass that would release the power of the nuclear bomb.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - When officials at the Smithsonian Institution unveiled a new home for the World War II bomber Enola Gay in August, they had hoped to avoid the kind of controversy that had previously troubled efforts to exhibit the airplane, which carried the first atomic bomb. But a group of scholars, writers, activists and others has signed a petition criticizing the exhibit for labeling the Enola Gay "the largest and most technologically advanced airplane for its time" without mentioning that the Boeing B-29 dropped the bomb on Hiroshima.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2003
CHANTILLY, Va. -- The B-29 Superfortress Enola Gay, the warplane that began the nuclear age with the first use of an atomic weapon on human beings, has been installed in a place of honor at the National Air and Space Museum's Udvar-Hazy Center here. It is the first time the airplane has been fully reassembled in 40 years. Eight years ago, another Smithsonian exhibit featuring a portion of the airplane was scrapped and the museum director resigned after a furor erupted over the museum's plans to use the exhibit to address the moral debate over atomic warfare.
NEWS
By Roger Tatarian | June 20, 1994
PATRICK Buchanan, the columnist and sometimes candidate for president, is all agog over Pavel Sudoplatov, a former KGB agent who claims firsthand knowledge of Soviet espionage into U.S. atomic secrets.Mr. Sudoplatov is the principal author of a recently published book titled "Special Tasks: The Memoirs of an Unwanted Soviet Spymaster." The book alleges that key scientists in making the U.S. atom bomb -- J. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard and Neils Bohr -- had passed crucial information on to the Soviet Union during World War II.The Sudoplatov book has raised a lot of eyebrows, but not Pat Buchanan's.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has told President Clinton that North Korea probably has developed one or two nuclear bombs, according to administration officials.The classified assessment -- supported by virtually all intelligence agencies but disputed by the State Department's analysts -- deepens the administration's difficulties as it tries to fulfill Mr. Clinton's pledge that "North Korea cannot be allowed to develop a nuclear bomb."If confirmed, North Korea's nuclear status would have significant implications for Asian stability.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 2002
WASHINGTON - More than a decade after Saddam Hussein agreed to give up weapons of mass destruction, Iraq has intensified its quest for nuclear weapons and has embarked on a worldwide hunt for materials to make an atomic bomb, Bush administration officials said yesterday. In the past 14 months, Iraq has tried to buy thousands of specialized aluminum tubes, which U.S. officials believe were intended as components of centrifuges to enrich uranium. U.S. officials said several efforts to arrange shipment of the high-strength tubes were blocked or intercepted, but, citing the sensitivity of the information, they declined to say where they came from or how they were stopped.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 27, 2002
Two summer theater series have launched their seasons with shows about legendary Americans who lived two centuries apart. 1776 is a historic musical not merely because it's about a chapter of American history, but also because it's something of a historic achievement itself. How else would you describe Peter Stone and Sherman Edwards' successful transformation of the signing of the Declaration of Independence - a pivotal but potentially dry episode - into moving musical theater? When the curtain rises on Cockpit in Court's main stage, the tableau of the Second Continental Congress created by designer James J. Fasching is as striking as a museum painting.
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