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Eileen Ambrose | September 30, 2013
According to a Bankrate.com survey of 25 large U.S. markets, we in Baltimore enjoy the lowest ATM fees. The survey found that our average ATM fee is $3.59. (This is an average of the combined fees from the ATM operator and the customer's own bank or thrift.) That still seems high. If you were to go to the ATM to withdraw $20, that fee runs about 18 percent. When it comes to overdraft fees, which Bankrate says have risen 15 years in a row, Baltimore comes in 13 th with an average of $32.55.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
A Glen Burnie man was charged with attempted homicide and assault after police said he stabbed and slashed a man with a knife during an altercation at an automatic teller machine Saturday at Glen Burnie Town Center. Anne Arundel County Police said they arrested Timothy John Garrity, 62, of Glen Burnie. Police were called to the Crain Highway shopping center at 1:27 a.m. after witnesses saw two men and a woman fighting at the M&T Bank ATM. Officers found a man bleeding from his hand who said a man and woman tried to rob him. Officers then received a call from a stabbing victim at Baltimore Washington Medical Center, who said he and a woman had been at the ATM when a man approached and began slashing at him with a knife, police said.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 4, 2012
APG Federal Credit Union said an outdoor ATM at its Forest Hill branch caught fire at 9:05 a.m. Friday, forcing the temporary closure of the branch for a few hours. The Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company extinguished the fire and all credit union members and employees were safe and unharmed, the credit union said in a news release. The credit union later said the branch had reopened at noon Friday. The free standing ATM where the fire was is in a drive-through lane at the branch at 2010 Rock Spring Road.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 12, 2014
Two men charged in the theft of an automated teller machine (ATM) from an Ellicott City CITGO last month have been indicted by a Howard County Grand Jury.  Muyideen Ayinla Nureni, 31, of Hyattsville, and Patric Jamal Frazier, 25, of Washington D.C., were indicted on second-degree burglary, theft, conspiracy and other charges in connection with the April 10 incident. Both have been released on $500,000 bond, according to the indictment handed down on May 7. According to police, officers were dispatched to the CITGO, located in the 8300 block of Baltimore National Pike, at 2 a.m. April 10 for a report of a burglary.
NEWS
November 21, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a San Francisco Examiner editorial, which was published Tuesday.THE BANKING industry is proving to be its own worst enemy in the aftermath of a losing election campaign over excessive automated teller machine fees.Earlier this month, San Francisco voters approved a measure that prohibits banks from charging non-customers a second fee for using their ATMs. Instead of being gracious losers, the banks obtained a temporary injunction.The banks have a public relations disaster on their hands.
NEWS
Liz F. Kay | September 30, 2011
Some people rarely use their debit cards for purchases in stores or elsewhere. If that's the case for you, one way to avoid ever being charged Bank of America's debit card fee is to switch to a plain vanilla ATM-only card. It's a good option for folks who only use their debit to withdraw money from the ATM. And it provides another benefit: if that card is stolen the thief would need to know your PIN to get access to your cash --- they couldn't use it in a store, either. A Bank of America spokeswoman told me this morning that customers who want an ATM only card should call customer service or stop into a banking center.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Tribune Newspapers | July 5, 2009
Question: : While traveling in Peru for several months, I have been using my ATM card. No fees were ever disclosed. I have since learned that I have been charged an international transaction fee plus a $5 fee for each transaction. The combined fees have added up to hundreds of dollars. Trying to get a refund has been fruitless. Shouldn't banks make customers aware of these fees? Answer: : They do. Why, it took me only about 30 minutes of hunting on the bank's Web site to find the answer.
NEWS
October 15, 1996
A Columbia woman was robbed of $60 Saturday as she withdrew money from an automated teller machine in Laurel, police said.Janine Rekdahl, 29, was taking cash from the ATM at the Citizen's National Bank branch in the 3300 block of Laurel-Fort Meade Road shortly before 4 p.m. when a man behind her asked, "Can I have your money, please?" police said.When Rekdahl turned around, she saw a man pointing a small handgun. Again, he said, "Please," and she handed him the money.The man walked away with another man who was waiting around the corner, police said.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 15, 1999
I BOW TO NO ONE in my reverence for the ATM, which can be likened to the light bulb or the Salk vaccine as a milestone development for mankind.But you sure run into a lot of annoying people at these places.Like in the drive-up lane. I always seem to get behind the person who can't pull her car close enough to actually use the ATM.This is the person who ends up six feet away from the machine. She throws the car in reverse, lurches back a few feet, then lurches forward and tries it again.This time she ends up five feet away.
BUSINESS
By MarketWatch | June 17, 2007
NEW YORK -- You'd never consider donating $300 of your annual income to a bank, would you? If you're withdrawing cash from an ATM twice a week that could be just what you're doing. Cash machines are convenient, but the fees they charge cost Americans more than $4 billion a year, reports Bankrate.com. You pay an average $1.64 per transaction every time you withdraw money from an ATM owned by a bank where you don't hold an account. Tack on the average $1.25 your own bank charges for each withdrawal and you're looking at fees of about $300 a year.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | April 22, 2014
The following is compiled from police reports from the Towson and Cockeysville precincts. Our policy is to include descriptions when there is enough information to make identification possible. An man armed with a revolver approached another man who was making a deposit at an ATM machine in the 6700 block of York Road at about 11 p.m. on April 11 and demanded cash, police reports state. The robber did not get the cash and then fled, police report. Towson Knollwood Road , 7900 block, between 5:30 a.m. and 6:16 p.m. April 12. Person kicked in door of apartment, stole cash, Xbox, jewelry, Tigerfest tickets.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 25, 2014
Aberdeen police say a 66-year-old man fought off a would-be robber during an armed holdup attempt at an ATM last Wednesday night. At about 7:30 p.m., officers responded to the 1000 block of Beards Hill Road for a reported attempted armed robbery, the Aberdeen Police Department said in a news release. Officers contacted the victim, an Aberdeen resident, who told them he was struck on the back of the head with a gun as he left the ATM vestibule of the PNC Bank, police said. The man said he was knocked to the ground, but was able to fight off the suspect, who then ran off, police said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
After stealing a fellow rider's phone on a Maryland Transit Administration bus in Baltimore this summer, three men forced the man to exit the bus and withdraw cash from an ATM in order to get the phone back, according to MTA Police. Now, police are asking for the public's help identifying the three men they believe were involved in the armed robbery, in which a gun and a knife were displayed to intimidate the victim. The robbery occurred about 5:55 p.m. on Aug. 4, after the victim boarded a No. 40 bus in Woodlawn and began riding it into the city, police said this week.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | September 30, 2013
According to a Bankrate.com survey of 25 large U.S. markets, we in Baltimore enjoy the lowest ATM fees. The survey found that our average ATM fee is $3.59. (This is an average of the combined fees from the ATM operator and the customer's own bank or thrift.) That still seems high. If you were to go to the ATM to withdraw $20, that fee runs about 18 percent. When it comes to overdraft fees, which Bankrate says have risen 15 years in a row, Baltimore comes in 13 th with an average of $32.55.
NEWS
By Mark Bowles | September 17, 2013
Most people have a handful of old, used cell phones sitting around at home. And for years, there's been no way for people to safely and conveniently recycle or resell their old phones for cash. They'd have to sell their old phones online or on Craigslist and hope that the transaction with a stranger happened safely. But usually, the phones would just sit in drawers or be thrown in the trash, polluting soil and water supplies. Finding a way to responsibly recycle a phone for cash was inconvenient and sometimes unsafe.
EXPLORE
August 5, 2013
The following is compiled from police reports. It is the Baltimore Messenger's policy to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Baltimore City Police Department's Northern District at 410-396-2455. Art Museum Drive Unit block, between 3:05 and 4:45 p.m. Aug. 3. Book bag, Toshiba laptop stolen from vehicle. Unit block, between 10:30 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. July 29. Garmin GPS stolen from vehicle.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 28, 2005
TODAY WE present the new and updated Guide to ATM Etiquette, which should be referenced anytime someone is waiting behind you to use the machine, and especially if that someone behind you is me: Let's start with the basics. If you're in a car, pull the car close enough to the ATM so you can actually use it via an open window. See, when you have to unbuckle your seat belt, open the door and lean out at a 45-degree angle until your stubby little fingers reach the keys, this process can take all day. People will want to hit you with a brick.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | May 21, 2009
Frederick police are investigating a "skimming" device that was installed on a PNC Bank ATM in April. The device recorded the information on the magnetic strips of credit or debit cards used at the machine, according to police. A camera also recorded customers' fingers as they typed in their PIN at the free-standing ATM, at Opposumtown Pike and Thomas Johnson Drive near Fort Detrick, said Frederick police spokesman Lt. Clark Pennington. The information was used to make fraudulent credit cards for withdrawing money in Maryland and surrounding states, police said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
A family-run crime enterprise carried out a series of high-wire burglaries, swiping entire safes, cracking open ATMs, and cutting power and phone service to businesses before rushing in, according to federal charges unsealed Thursday. But the flashy robberies were a sideshow to the crew's prescription pill dealing at its home base in an auto shop on a dead-end Southwest Baltimore street, authorities allege. The group also is accused of distributing drugs at Lexington Market and smuggling them into a Jessup prison.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Maryland's casinos will be allowed to open 24 hours a day under new regulations approved Thursday by the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission that also relaxed limits on ATMs and lending to gamblers in the facilities. With the advent of full-scale casino gambling in Maryland after voters approved table games in the November election, the commission is updating the regulatory regime and relaxing some restrictions. The changes also added new rules, including some governing junkets that casinos provide to high-rolling gamblers.
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