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BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder | January 21, 1991
American Map Corp. has debuted an unusual and useful type of road atlas, one specifically designed to help business travelers find their way throughout the country by car.Unlike most competing publications, the "United States City to City Atlas for the Traveling Professional" includes maps not only of each state and major metropolitan area but also of the major streets and highways in smaller places. Places such as Erie, Pa.; Topeka, Kan.; Eugene, Ore., and Flagstaff, Ariz.In all, the "City to City Atlas" has maps of the major roads in and around 163 cities.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | December 3, 2012
The world is abuzz about the pregnancy of the Dutchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton, which some publications report likely had to reveal the news after being hospitalized with hyperemesis gravidarum.  But what exactly is hyperemesis gravidarum? The condition is so rare that Robert O. Atlas, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, questioned at first whether reports were correct that she had the illness.  He said it is a syndrome that inflicts less than 1 percent of pregnant women.
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EXPLORE
August 24, 2011
(Open letter to Mayor Craig Moe and Laurel City Council): As we finally reach the long-sought goal of a new senior center in the Laurel area (11 years in the making), we of ATLAS — All Together for Laurel/Beltsville Area Seniors — would like to express our most sincere thanks for the help and support that the city of Laurel has provided. You have been with us from the very beginning. In fact, you helped launch the project when you joined with the District 21 team and the Prince George's County Council in establishing the task force, which confirmed the need for, and feasibility of, the program.
EXPLORE
August 24, 2011
(Open letter to Mayor Craig Moe and Laurel City Council): As we finally reach the long-sought goal of a new senior center in the Laurel area (11 years in the making), we of ATLAS — All Together for Laurel/Beltsville Area Seniors — would like to express our most sincere thanks for the help and support that the city of Laurel has provided. You have been with us from the very beginning. In fact, you helped launch the project when you joined with the District 21 team and the Prince George's County Council in establishing the task force, which confirmed the need for, and feasibility of, the program.
NEWS
September 5, 1993
A heart-wrenching odyssey that began in Washington and Baltimore synagogues four years ago ended last week. Allison Atlas died.You might never have heard of the 24-year-old Bethesda woman and, if you had, probably not for the last couple of years. But the lives of a couple of hundred people, and possibly more, have been prolonged on her behalf.Ms. Atlas was a vivacious business student at New York University when she contracted leukemia in 1989. Her family mobilized to find a match who could donate bone marrow to cure the young woman.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 12, 2000
Joey Atlas, a freshman at Calvert Hall High School, won the No. 1 singles championship at yesterday's MIAA A Conference individual competition. Atlas, ranked No. 20 in the nation and No. 1 in the Mid Atlantic (in 14s and under) last year, defeated senior Amir Zamani of Gilman school in straight sets (6-3, 6-2). Zamani, headed for Stanford this fall, had only five unforced errors in the first set but could not overcome Atas' overpowering first serve. Atas played error-free tennis in the second set to secure the hard fought match.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1994
On any day in 1878, Hector H. Goodman, an Annapolis merchant, could likely stand outside his small drugstore at 11 Main St. near the City Dock and watch the goings-on in the old seaport village.To his left was the town's coal office, right next to Market House. Up near Church Circle, William H. Gorman & Co. ran the Maryland Hotel.The coal house is gone now, though Market House is still in place. The Maryland Hotel has become the Maryland Inn. Restaurants and tourist shops line Main Street.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | January 3, 1994
Carroll County's newest atlas is for sale, but if you're looking for the latest in development in the county, you'd won't find it in these maps.The Historical Society of Carroll County has just released a reprint of the popular 1877 "Atlas of Carroll County," originally published by Lake, Griffing & Stevenson of Philadelphia."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 3, 2000
Some critics believe Saul Bellow is the greatest novelist to write in the English language in the 20th century. Others say one of his books -- whether "Mr. Sammler's Planet" or "Humboldt's Gift" or "Herzog" -- is the elusive Great American Novel. Hyperbole, you say. Perhaps. Still, his genius deserves better than the strange, much-ballyhooed biography by James Atlas. Bellow, who is 85, is deeply rooted in Chicago. He has been married five times and is father of four children of whom the youngest, Naomi Rose, will be 1 year old this month.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2003
For those who appreciate collecting or spending hour upon hour studying maps, this has been a very good year. Johns Hopkins University Press issued an expanded edition of The Hammond-Harwood House Atlas of Historic Maps of Maryland, 1608-1908 ($69.95), by Edward C. Papenfuse, state archivist, and Joseph M. Coale III. Their original edition was published in 1982 to mark the 350th anniversary of Maryland's charter. The Hopkins Press also published Richard C. Carpenter's A Railroad Atlas of the United States in 1946: The Mid-Atlantic States ($65)
NEWS
By Eric Weiner | January 3, 2008
A new year is upon us, and the self-help industrial complex is in full swing, pestering us to slim down, bulk up, become a new you, a better you, a happier you. Yes, it's all about you. The 1970s may have been the Me Decade, but the "naught" years are shaping up to be the You Decade. There is, it turns out, little difference between You and Me. Both outlooks reflect a firmly held and particularly American belief that happiness lies deep inside the inner you, or me, or whatever. The self-help industry has it wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allie Semenza | June 7, 2007
Catch the Bravery tonight when the band takes the stage at the 9:30 Club. With use of electronica and danceable beats, the band has steadily gained popularity with the indie-rock crowd. The Bravery plays with Cinematics and Photo Atlas at 7:30. The 9:30 Club is at 815 V St. N.W. Tickets are $15. Call 800-955-5566 or go to tickets.com.
NEWS
July 31, 2006
On Saturday July 29, 2006, LOUISE ATLAS DAVIS, beloved wife of the late David Stanley Davis, M.D., loving mother of Lynette Cohen of Reisterstown, MD, and Dr. Jeanette Parris of Scituate, MA, devoted mother-in-law of Dr. Robert Parris, beloved sister of Rabbi Seymour Atlas of Hollywood, FL, and the late Judith Feldman Sondheim, Raphael David Atlas and Dr. Harry Atlas, loving grandmother of David Cohen, Laura and Michelle Parris. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd., at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Monday July 31, at 1 P.M. Interment Beth Sholom Congregation Cemetery, Capitol Heights, MD. Please omit flowers.
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006
NEWPORT, KY. The newest tourist attraction in Greater Cincinnati isn't a museum, sports team, amusement park or regional mall. It's an old bridge. THE WORLD ALMANAC WORLD ATLAS 2006 Hammond World Atlas / $24.95 This atlas is a triumph of common sense. It starts with a respectable 103 pages of maps followed by a 45-page index. But it doesn't stop there. Next comes a time-zone map and more than 60 pages of country-by-country facts and figures on population, per-capita gross domestic product, life expectancies, literacy rates and major industries, for example.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 12, 2006
You know that hail of junk e-mails you get, promising to clean up your credit, restore your hearing or give you a little more respect around the neighborhood? Well, Linn Goldberg, who heads the Division of Health Promotion and Sports Medicine at the Oregon Health & Science University, got one of those entreaties. "At the university, they throw a lot of my good stuff away and you don't know if it's junk or not. So I have to go through my junk mail every day," Goldberg said. Good thing he did, or he and the Portland-based school would have missed out on a $1 million grant from Sports Illustrated to fund programs that give high school athletes other options than alcohol, drugs, steroids and sports supplements.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
For thousands of years, the people of ancient Persia and their descendants in modern Iran have called it the Persian Gulf. But the National Geographic Society's mapmakers noticed that some U.S. military agencies and other map gazers use the name Arabian Gulf for the body of water on Iran's southwestern shore. So they altered the eighth edition of the society's influential Atlas of the World to include Arabian Gulf as an alternate name (in parentheses) under the traditional title. That has landed them in hot water with Iranians from Los Angeles to Tehran.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 31, 1999
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Over a brunch of salmon roulade and pan-seared beef tenderloin in the marble-walled ballroom of a new five-star hotel here the other day, President Thabo Mbeki was presented with the ultimate evidence of this fledgling democracy's electoral sophistication.It was a leather-bound Atlas of Results from the June 2 election, this country's second democratic national ballot in the post-apartheid era of black-majority rule.The atlas, officially described as the first of its type in the world, is a kaleidoscope of national political sentiment, a colorful encyclopedia of voter fervor and party strength.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Staff Writer | February 24, 1992
Fast, inexpensive personal computers with large hard disks or CD-ROM drives have brought a whole new meaning to Casey Stengel's old phrase, "You can look it up."Whether you're looking it up in a dictionary, a thesaurus, an atlas or even an encyclopedia, you can probably find a way to do it right from the computer screen, without the hassle of searching for the right volume on your bookshelf or thumbing through indexes.While on-line reference works don't have the elegance, heft or occasionally the detail of their printed counterparts, they do offer many advantages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Sun Staff | August 29, 2004
Cloud Atlas: A Novel, by David Mitchell. Random House. 510 pages. $14.95. British novelist David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas is a highly imaginative, inventively structured and sometimes exasperating work that will challenge any serious reader of fiction. It is a book with large themes -- civilization, conflict, power and redemption -- presented as six novellas, each set in a different time and each written in a different style. The six sections cover periods from the 1850s to hundreds of years from now. All except one are written in the first person, and all the episodes are connected because the narrators always discover the works, diaries or testimonies of their predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 4, 2004
Atlas of the World. Oxford. 304 pages. $80. Since early childhood, I have been an enormous fan of maps and especially of atlases. Nowadays, anybody with an inexpensive computer can get programming that is usually far more efficient and effective in finding routes and places than are maps printed on paper. Still, wandering through an atlas -- and there has never been a greater one than Oxford University Press' -- is a rare experience of fantasy, learning and beauty. This newest edition, the 11th, is graced by lots of new material, including stunning satellite photographs.
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