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By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,Orlando Sentinel | September 3, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- For the second time in 10 days, shuttle Atlantis' six astronauts flew into the Kennedy Space Center yesterday to prepare for a scheduled launch this week. The countdown toward Wednesday's planned 12:28 p.m. liftoff is set to begin at 8 a.m. this morning. Forecasters are predicting typical summer weather at Cape Canaveral on launch day: high temperatures in the upper 80s with partly cloudy skies and a 40 percent chance of scattered thunderstorms. Nature has been uncooperative with NASA's attempts to launch the shuttle on an important 11-day construction mission to the International Space Station.
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SPORTS
Sports on TV | November 25, 2011
FRIDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS M. bask. Old Spice Classic, 1st Semi.: TBA ESPNNoon Rider@James Madison CSNP, TCN2 Battle 4 Atlantis, First Semi.: TBA VS.2 76 Classic, First Semi.: Teams TBA ESPN2:30 Battle 4 Atlantis, 2nd Semi.: TBA VS.4:30 NIT Season Tip-Off, Final: Teams TBA ESPN5 Valparaiso@Ohio State...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 9, 2000
Not to be confused with the Atlantic in Canton, the new Atlantis has opened in Columbia at 5485 Harper's Farm Road. The specialty is seafood, as you might guess from the name. The menu stays the same at lunch and dinner. Signature dishes include oysters Atlantis (oysters stuffed with shrimp, crab and spinach, then topped with bearnaise sauce), crab cakes and lobster Thermidor. Entrees are priced from $10 to $28. Owner Robert Alipanah, who worked at Mo's seafood restaurants before this, says he's so pleased with how business is going that he's putting a piano bar in soon.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
While some folks wish to see their names up in lights, students at Folly Quarter Middle School can boast that their names have gone up in space. The students at the Ellicott City school recently participated in the NASA and Lockheed Martin Student Signatures in Space (S3) program, which allows youngsters to sign posters that are scanned onto a disk and sent into orbit. The students signed the posters last spring, and their signatures were sent up in space in late February via the space shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 26, 2001
The five space travelers - including three Baltimore natives - who delivered the U.S. science lab Destiny to the International Space Station last month will be greeted today at the Maryland Science Center with a public program at 12:30 p.m. and a reception from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Kenwood High graduate Thomas D. Jones, Woodlawn High alumnus Robert L. Curbeam Jr., Baltimore-born Marsha Ivins and their commander, Ken Cockrell, and pilot, Mark Polansky, will...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2001
In the latest Disney cartoon feature, "Atlantis," the moviemakers imbue the unveiling of the 1914 submarine Ulysses with the same shiver-inducing awe that Disney's live-action craftsmen conveyed when they unleashed the Nautilus 47 years ago in "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea." Working with computer and hand-drawn animation, Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise (who made their debut as directors with the superb "Beauty and the Beast") bring this high adventure at low depths enough flair and conviction to keep the movie buoyant even when its plot is abrupt and its emotionality conventional.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,Orlando Sentinel | September 9, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA will get one more chance this morning to launch space shuttle Atlantis before the mission is delayed for at least three weeks. The latest in a series of launch scrubs happened yesterday because of a faulty sensor in the shuttle's external fuel tank. The problem occurred as the tank was being fueled. NASA will make another launch attempt at 11:14 a.m. today using guidelines developed when the same issue cropped up during a 2005 launch. The decision to scrub came after a lengthy debate among mission managers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 20, 2000
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Assigned to rescue the still-under-construction International Space Station, seven astronauts orbiting Earth aboard shuttle Atlantis whisked ever closer last night to a rendezvous with their quarry. Capping a perfect countdown, Atlantis blasted into space at 6:11 a.m. yesterday from the Kennedy Space Center, the shuttle and its tower of smoke catching the rose-colored rays of dawn. At that moment, the space station was passing over Turkey, northeast of Ankara near the Black Sea. Eight minutes later, the crew achieved orbit and Atlantis began a 42-hour chase of the space station, which is slowly falling back to Earth.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
The picture on Adam Riess' computer monitor arrived fresh from the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. It was the fading light from an exploding star, potentially a key piece of evidence in his yearslong investigation of one of the greatest of all cosmological mysteries - dark energy. But as the Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist waited for the next image to arrive, an e-mail message popped onto his screen. In an instant, he tumbled into what he describes as one of those "uh-oh" moments when everything changes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 1997
HOUSTON -- As Atlantis' astronauts sailed past the halfway point of their visit to Russia's space station yesterday, ground control teams considered a request from Mir's cosmonauts to dispose of potentially contaminated water and other refuse that have accumulated aboard the 11-year-old outpost.The surprise request was perhaps one of the least glamorous examples of how the Russians, with their orbital space station, and the United States, with its space shuttle, are learning to work together.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 14, 2009
Astronomers around the world got their first close-up look at the Hubble Space Telescope in seven years Wednesday as astronauts aboard the shuttle Atlantis closed in and captured the orbiting observatory for its final round of repairs and upgrades. "When we first had images of the Hubble Space Telescope, there were audible gasps of elation. This was truly a wonderful sight after seven years," said Jon Morse, NASA's director of astrophysics. Mission specialist Megan McArthur grabbed the 12-ton telescope with the shuttle's robot arm at 1:14 p.m. while orbiting 350 miles above western Australia.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
The picture on Adam Riess' computer monitor arrived fresh from the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. It was the fading light from an exploding star, potentially a key piece of evidence in his yearslong investigation of one of the greatest of all cosmological mysteries - dark energy. But as the Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist waited for the next image to arrive, an e-mail message popped onto his screen. In an instant, he tumbled into what he describes as one of those "uh-oh" moments when everything changes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 4, 2009
Seven astronauts are stranded in orbit after their shuttle is damaged during launch. Unable to repair the ship, they hunker down with dwindling supplies while four more astronauts board a second spacecraft and blast off on a daring rescue mission. NASA executives would like to keep this scenario in the realm of science fiction. But they're preparing for it just the same on the slim chance the shuttle Atlantis is crippled during the May 11 repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. A second shuttle - Endeavour - is poised for liftoff from Cape Canaveral if there's a call for help from Atlantis.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | February 16, 2008
Space cadets! The forecast tonight is promising for a fine view of the International Space Station, the shuttle Atlantis and a combined crew of 10 as they fly from high over Lake Michigan to the Outer Banks. The new Columbus module and Atlantis should make it brighter than ever. The space station rises like a bright star in the northwest at 6:37 p.m., climbing high in the southwestern sky by 6:40 p.m. It grazes bright star Rigel at Orion's foot and disappears in the southeast at 6:42 p.m.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
Bidding farewell to a legend At Franklin High School, Jill Myers has been there so long it seems she's part of the building itself. But after 39 years as a teacher, coach and athletic director, she is retiring. Sports baltimoresun.com/kent Just blame Ehrlich Laura Vozzella looks at the back-and-forth with Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Republicans over the prospect of higher fees by the MVA. Metro baltimoresun.com/vozzella OTHER VOICES Jean Marbella on Mitchell's planMaryland Rick Maese on the LPGA tournamentSports Chris Kaltenbach on filmsMovies Today Ray Frager on O's media numbersSports 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY LakeFest -- The kickoff event of the 20th Columbia Festival of the Arts takes place today through Sunday at the Columbia lakefront.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 1, 2007
CAPE CANAVERAL -- NASA has delayed space shuttle Atlantis' planned March 15 launch until at least late April to fix hail damage to the ship's external fuel tank. A ferocious thunderstorm packing 62-mph gusts pelted Launch Pad 39A with golf-ball-size hailstones Monday, carving an estimated 7,000 divots in the foam insulation that covers the giant tank. Engineers must repair hundreds of the worst gouges and minor damage to about 27 heat-resistant tiles on Atlantis' left wing before the shuttle is allowed to fly. "This constitutes, in our evaluation, the worst damage that we have ever seen from hail on the external-tank foam," said Wayne Hale, NASA's space shuttle program manager.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2003
The space shuttle Columbia was not the first to have superheated gas invade its left wing on re-entering Earth's atmosphere, according to documents released yesterday by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In 2000, the documents show, the shuttle Atlantis went into orbit with a quarter-inch breach in the wing's leading edge, allowing blowtorch-hot plasma into the wing on re-entry. But unlike the accident that destroyed Columbia on Feb. 1 and killed its crew of seven, the incident resulted in only minor damage, leaving the wing's inner structure intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 17, 2001
It was Walt Disney Pictures, with "The Little Mermaid," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Aladdin," that ignited the feature animation revival roughly a decade ago. But since 1994's "The Lion King," the Disney cartoons winning the greatest accolades have been boutique productions with limited studio involvement: the "Toy Story" movies and "A Bug's Life" from John Lasseter and his computer animation team at Pixar. The most acclaimed cartoons of recent years -- Brad Bird's "The Iron Giant," the Aardman animators' "Chicken Run" and "South Park: Bigger, Longer and Uncut" -- have come from outside Disney.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton and Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton,Orlando Sentinel | September 22, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA will spend the next month considering a possible service call to the Hubble Space Telescope after shuttle Atlantis safely glided home yesterday through starry pre-dawn skies. The shuttle's six astronauts ended a four-year hiatus in the construction of the International Space Station by installing a new set of solar arrays that eventually will double the outpost's power supply. But Atlantis' flight could have an equally important impact on future shuttle operations beginning with the next scheduled launch to the station in December.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton and Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton,Orlando Sentinel | September 21, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Atlantis is heading home this morning after a late inspection of the ship's heat shielding yesterday found nothing wrong. The inspection was prompted by Tuesday's sighting of an unknown object that apparently shook loose from Atlantis during prelanding checkouts of the shuttle's body flaps and steering thrusters. Eight hours of surveys using cameras on Atlantis' robot arm and a sensor-laden 50-foot boom did not detect any sign the object was dislodged from the ship's critical heat armor.
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