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By Matt Schnabel and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
When a shark tagged off the Eastern Shore as part of a marine-life tracking project took off on an unprecedented monthlong journey, researchers quite literally watched its every move. Thanks to cutting-edge satellite tags, scientists at the Guy Harvey Research Institute plotted and analyzed the Mid-Atlantic odyssey of I-NSU, a juvenile shortfin mako shark that a GHRI team caught in May off the coast of Ocean City . Since being tagged, I-NSU has traveled at least 8,000 miles, more than 1,000 of them in a shockingly straight path over the course of about 30 days, researchers said.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
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NEWS
By Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood and Gilbert M. Gaul and Anthony R. Wood,Knight Ridder/tribune | March 26, 2000
More than any state in the nation, New Jersey has taken a stand against the invading tides. It has the most engineered beach in the country, its coastline bearing more scar tissue than any other shoreline. It has one of the nation's highest annual shore-protection budgets, $25 million, administered by the state's land-use agency, the Department of Environmental Protection. The state is so committed to shoring up its beaches that the department's commissioner, Robert Shinn -- who normally deals with preserving the environment, not shoring up expensive beachfront property -- has lobbied in Trenton and Washington for beachfill money.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Eight Democratic members of Maryland's congressional delegation wrote President Obama Monday urging him to reconsider his administration's plan to allow seismic testing for oil and gas off the mid-Atlantic coast. In a jointly signed letter, the eight called seismic testing the first major step toward opening the Atlantic Ocean to offshore drilling, which carries the risk of oil spills. But they warned that the tests themselves would be "incredibly harmful to marine mammals and fisheries in the region," generating "dynamite-like" blasts of compressed air underwater that could hurt whales, dolphins and fish.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
When he spotted the Spirit of Butts Farm soaring high above the rocky coast of Ireland, David Brown thought the 11-pound airplane was "the prettiest thing I'd ever seen." And for good reason. The Maryland-built, balsa-and-Mylar aircraft had just completed a journey no model had made before: an 1,888-mile cruise across the Atlantic Ocean, powered by less than a gallon of fuel. "In the model airplane world, this is no different from Armstrong landing on the moon," says Carl Layden, an official observer for the history-making flight.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
In the off-season, Ocean City often adds some new feature for tourists: a miniature golf course perhaps, a seafood restaurant or maybe a bar that caters to the beachgoing crowd. But here's a possible addition that might not be so welcome - parking meters north of 10 t h Street. On Friday, the Ocean City Council is expected to be briefed on a proposal to create a whopping 4,800 paid parking spaces. The most ambitious version of the plan would require visitors to pay for parking at any space along the streets on the Atlantic Ocean side of Coastal Highway from 10 t h Street to the Delaware line.
NEWS
May 23, 2006
One hurricane hitting where you live is enough to make it a bad season." MAX MAYFIELD, director of the National Hurricane Center, on the severity of this year's hurricane season; the center predicts four to six major hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico
NEWS
March 8, 2009
MOLLY KOOL CARNEY, 93 Groundbreaking sailor Molly K. Carney, who as Molly Kool was the first woman in North America to become a licensed ship captain, died Feb. 25 at a retirement home in Bangor, Maine. Known in Canada by her maiden name, Molly Kool won her captain's papers in 1939 and sailed the Atlantic Ocean between Alma, New Brunswick, and Boston for five years, her friend Ken Kelly said.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown | August 11, 1993
Hank Dekker, bidding to become the first blind person to sail solo across the Atlantic Ocean, hopes to start for the journey for the second time Monday or Tuesday.Dekker had to turn back less than 200 miles into the trip 12 days ago because of electronics failures and a three-inch crack in the hull of his 30-foot sailboat.Dekker had planned to leave this week, but repairs are being made to his boat in Atlantic City, N.J., and are taking longer than expected."The boat was struck by lightning," said Pat Maurer, public information coordinator of the National Federation of the Blind, the Baltimore-based organization that is sponsoring Dekker's trip.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
The Chesapeake Bay became the center of the sailing world as a pack of Volvo Open 70 yachts sailed up from Rio de Janeiro to Baltimore in Leg 5 of the Volvo Ocean Race. After stopovers in Baltimore and Annapolis, which included maintenance, racing and a festival, the boats started the next leg of the race Sunday, heading off to New York. Thousands watched the departure from boats lining the race route and from the Bay Bridge, where the Bay Bridge Walk coincided with the restart. After New York, the racers are scheduled to head across the Atlantic Ocean to Portsmouth, England, in Leg 7 of the race.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
The Obama administration took a step closer Friday to allowing oil and gas exploration off the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic coasts, drawing praise from the energy industry and criticism from environmentalists. The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management approved a framework for doing seismic testing from the Delaware Bay to mid-Florida and up to 400 miles offshore. The decision sets the stage for federal officials to begin issuing permits for surveying an area roughly the size of California.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
The Maryland and Delaware Atlantic Ocean beach resorts got a bit of good news to kick off the summer season this past week. The latest survey by the National Resources Defense Council rates both states as having some of the cleanest beach water in the country. Based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards for swimmer safety (and the prevalence of disease-causing bacteria or viruses), Maryland had the fourth safest coastal beaches in the country. Delaware was the best overall.
SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
When a shark tagged off the Eastern Shore as part of a marine-life tracking project took off on an unprecedented monthlong journey, researchers quite literally watched its every move. Thanks to cutting-edge satellite tags, scientists at the Guy Harvey Research Institute plotted and analyzed the Mid-Atlantic odyssey of I-NSU, a juvenile shortfin mako shark that a GHRI team caught in May off the coast of Ocean City . Since being tagged, I-NSU has traveled at least 8,000 miles, more than 1,000 of them in a shockingly straight path over the course of about 30 days, researchers said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Federal officials announced plans Tuesday to auction the rights to build industrial wind turbines off Maryland's Atlantic coast - a move hailed by many environmentalists and some businesses as the first step toward a new green industry but criticized as a drain on household budgets by the state's lone Republican congressman. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell joined Gov. Martin O'Malley at Baltimore's harbor to declare that her department intends to offer leases for wind energy development on nearly 80,000 acres of the Outer Continental Shelf at least 10 nautical miles off Ocean City . "It's a big step forward," said Jewell of the Obama administration's goal of having 20,000 megawatts of renewable energy permitted by the end of the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
When the Irish-born novelist Colum McCann sits before a blank page, he launches himself into a vast, empty space. He's surrounded by fog on all sides, so he can't tell if his vehicle is right side up or upside down. The craft he's maneuvering is clunky, and the throttle sticks. No wonder the National Book Award-winning author felt compelled to write "TransAtlantic" about three fraught, historic journeys to Ireland in the 19th and 20th centuries. The first chronicles aviators John Alcock and Arthur Whitten Brown, who in June 1919 made the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
Approaching the heart of hurricane season, government forecasters say indicators are pointing to a potentially "very active" pattern in the tropics, affirming pre-season outlooks. "Our confidence for an above-normal season is still high because the predicted atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are favorable for storm development have materialized," Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center in College Park, said in a statement. "Also, two of the four named storms to-date formed in the deep tropical Atlantic, which historically is an indicator of an active season.
NEWS
June 27, 1991
Maryland's Department of Natural Resources will conduct a public meeting on the proposed striped-bass regulations for the 1991-1992 recreational, charter and commercial seasons from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday in the ground-floor conference room at the Maryland Department of Agriculture in Annapolis.The proposal would allow an increase in the striped-bass quota from 750,000 to 1,074,000 pounds total allowable catch. It also would establish the 1991-1992 season and require recreational permits, tags and catch limits.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Ocean City's fishing pier officially opened Friday as the Maryland resort town signaled it is ready for summer visitors. During last fall's storm, about 100 feet of the pier collapsed into the surging sea. The damage was featured prominently in news coverage of the storm. But at Friday's rededication, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan said the town had put all of that behind it. He said the re-opening the pier let's visitors know that “it's business as usual in Ocean City.” The pier was originally built in 1907 and has been rebuilt many times since then.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
U.S. government meteorologists predict a “possibly extremely active” hurricane season in 2013, the top National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration official said Thursday, with as many as half a dozen major hurricanes. NOAA expects 13 to 20 named tropical cyclones, seven to 11 of them reaching hurricane status, with maximum winds 74 mph or higher. Of those hurricanes, three to six could become major hurricanes, with winds of at least 111 mph. The forecast echoes outlooks released earlier this spring calling for another active hurricane season, which starts June 1 and ends Nov. 30. It continues an active trend stretching nearly two decades.
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