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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1995
When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said last week that it would close the hunting season for migratory Canada geese for at least one year starting this fall, hunters, outfitters and biologists said it could be beneficial to the goose population -- so long as the closure was throughout the Atlantic Flyway.The USFWS closure is intended to cover the American states in the territory, and now Canada will follow suit with a ban on hunting in areas crucial to Maryland's migratory population of Canada geese.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Maryland, which almost 15 years ago took the lead in restoring a depleted rockfish (striped bass) population, again plans to act aggressively to protect the future of the species.The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which oversees recreational and commercial fishing for migratory coastal species, recently determined that rockfish ages 8 and older (28 inches and larger) are being overfished.The ASMFC has mandated a minimum 14 percent reduction in harvest across the range of those fish in the year 2000 to protect the breeding stock.
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By PETER BAKER | August 17, 1993
Although Maryland's proposed Canada goose hunting seasons drew the most attention last week, the Department of Natural Resources also released its proposals for its other waterfowl seasons, including snow geese and ducks.According to the Fall Flight Forecast of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which must approve Maryland's proposed season, the overall breeding population of ducks is down 11 percent from last year. But the fall flight to the Atlantic Flyway is expected to be similar to last year's.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The Department of Natural Resources, which last week seemed ready to open a limited hunt for migratory Canada geese, yesterday decided to keep the season closed until at least fall 2000.Sarah Taylor-Rogers, secretary of DNR, said Maryland scrapped plans for a six-day hunt because waterfowl hunters objected."We asked hunters what they thought about a limited season, and a strong majority of hunters who responded were opposed to opening a season which would allow fewer than half of Maryland's waterfowl hunters to participate," said Taylor-Rogers.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
Recently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said it would continue the moratorium on Canada goose hunting this year throughout the Atlantic Flyway, while the Mississippi and Central flyway states can select up to 70-day seasons.The reason the Atlantic Flyway is closed for Canada geese is that the migrant population in the east is dangerously low, and a ban on hunting is considered the best way to assist in repopulation.And if tight restrictions on hunting are any indication of what might lie ahead for Maryland and the other 12 Atlantic Flyway states, then perhaps the recent past in the Mississippi Flyway offers a glimpse of our future.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
The state's flocks of resident Canada geese have increased to more than 70,000 birds, and hunting seasons for them will be expanded this year in an effort to help control the population boom."
NEWS
August 6, 1995
After years of heeding the cries of economic interests that profit from an extended goose hunting season, wildlife officials have finally heeded the mournful call of the disappearing Canada goose. The bitter decision to cancel this fall's Canada goose hunting season in Maryland and the rest of the Atlantic Flyway may save the migratory goose population from the point of collapse, even as it wipes out an important seasonal income for the Eastern Shore.Waterfowl experts have warned for several years that wild goose flocks are declining.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The proposed 1992-93 waterfowl hunting dates and bag limits announced by the state yesterday would -- for the first time -- extend the one-bird limit 20 days into the 60-day Canada goose season.The change is necessary because the Atlantic Flyway Council and the federal government have agreed to a 60 percent reduction in the annual harvest rate of Canada geese in the Atlantic Flyway, said Josh Sandt, director of the Wildlife Division of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | August 18, 1992
The snow melt came one to three weeks late this year above the 54th parallel, in the vast expanse of tundra and taiga in northern Quebec and Labrador where Canada geese migrate each year to nest and raise their young.According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1992 Status of Waterfowl & Fall Flight Forecast, the late snow melt, which prevents geese from establishing nesting sites, will result in reduced production for most North American goose populations.The greatest impact, however, will be felt by the Atlantic population, those birds that nest in Newfoundland, Labrador and Quebec, with the greatest number seeming to come from Ungava Bay and the northeastern shore of Hudson Bay on the Ungava Peninsula.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
To hunt or not to hunt? When asked that question, the state's waterfowl managers and the Wildlife Advisory Commission couldn't agree with the public on an answer. The state appears poised to approve a six-day season for migratory Canada geese next January, but 65 percent of the hunters, guides and landowners at a hearing last Monday were perplexed. So, one might ask, what problems do hunters have with re-opening a season that for decades was an integral part of late autumn and early winter mornings on the Eastern Shore?
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
The state's flocks of resident Canada geese have increased to more than 70,000 birds, and hunting seasons for them will be expanded this year in an effort to help control the population boom."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
For decades, Maryland's Eastern Shore was the place to hunt Canada geese -- until the shooting was stopped in 1995 because hunting pressure had become too great and annual breeding populations had become too small.And where once, within blinds strategically set near ponds and fields, booted and bundled hunters passed thermoses and flasks and anxious retrievers awaited the first shots on the crisp mornings of late autumn and early winter, there was prolonged silence.Now, after four seasons of closure throughout the Atlantic Flyway, the governments of the United States and Canada have decided to allow tightly restricted hunting seasons on migratory Canada geese from Quebec to Virginia.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Greater snow geese present a burgeoning problem, one the Department of Natural Resources wants to get under control before the population of snows potentially doubles in the next decade.Greater snows have been increasing in the Atlantic Flyway since the mid-1960s. More than 600,000 greater snows now winter in Maryland and Delaware, according to DNR, damaging or destroying habitat critical to the survival of other species -- and perhaps ultimately themselves.Snow geese feed by eating the root stalks of plants such as saltmarsh cordgrass, destroying the entire plant and eventually eliminating the marsh.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
The hunting season for migratory Canada geese again will be closed in Maryland and the Atlantic Flyway this fall, but according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a reopening of the season is a possibility in 1999.The season was closed by the USFWS and the state in 1995 to allow the breeding population to recover from over-hunting and several successive years of poor breeding conditions in northeastern Canada."I think we have done the right things, and the population is showing signs of recovery," said Jerry Serie, Atlantic Flyway representative for USFWS.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The Department of Natural Resources, which last week seemed ready to open a limited hunt for migratory Canada geese, yesterday decided to keep the season closed until at least fall 2000.Sarah Taylor-Rogers, secretary of DNR, said Maryland scrapped plans for a six-day hunt because waterfowl hunters objected."We asked hunters what they thought about a limited season, and a strong majority of hunters who responded were opposed to opening a season which would allow fewer than half of Maryland's waterfowl hunters to participate," said Taylor-Rogers.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
While the hunting season for migratory Canada geese has been closed in the Atlantic Flyway by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, parameters for duck-hunting seasons and bag limits likely will be expanded in response to population increases.In Maryland, the Department of Natural Resources proposes to expand the October split of the season to four days, the November split to seven and the final split to 39 days in December and January.DNR also proposes a daily bag limit of four birds, although the Fish and Wildlife Service guidelines would allow five.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
For several years, the sounds of migrating geese have been mostly missing from the early mornings in late winter along my small portion of the Western Shore. Over a period of several days last week, however, there was a clamor shortly after dawn as successive flights of Canada geese began their journeys north.As groups of a dozen or two rose through the altitudes, calling among themselves and fitting into the slipstreams built by the familiar v formation of their flights, the pieces of their sometimes puzzling life cycle again began to fit together.
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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
For most of the previous hour, Trapper, a young black labrador, had been roaming 20 yards ahead, edging into brush piles and running game trails, nose to the ground, tail upright, delighting in the mixture of smells and woodland mysteries.A mist left behind from an overnight rain hung under the low clouds of early morning, and even to human senses the woods smelled fresh. Fox and deer tracks were clearly defined in the soft ground.A yearling deer broke from cover in a bramble, and Trapper flinched, froze and then howled and started to give chase to the white-tail bounding away through heavy brush.
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