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By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
In an unusual move, the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces suspended grand jury hearings yesterday in the case of accused spy Daniel M. King to review allegations that the Navy violated his constitutional rights. The five judges, in a unanimous opinion, agreed to delay the hearings scheduled to begin today and asked the Navy to answer the charges by March 24. King, a petty officer 1st class formerly based at the National Security Agency at Fort Meade, is being held at Quantico, Va., on charges that he mailed a disk with information about U.S. eavesdropping to the Russian Embassy in 1994.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
In an unusual move, the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces suspended grand jury hearings yesterday in the case of accused spy Daniel M. King to review allegations that the Navy violated his constitutional rights. The five judges, in a unanimous opinion, agreed to delay the hearings scheduled to begin today and asked the Navy to answer the charges by March 24. King, a petty officer 1st class formerly based at the National Security Agency at Fort Meade, is being held at Quantico, Va., on charges that he mailed a disk with information about U.S. eavesdropping to the Russian Embassy in 1994.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent nTC | May 19, 1994
NORFOLK, Va. -- Straining under Pentagon cutbacks, U.S. military commanders are trying desperately to spare their troops unbearably long family separations as they respond to expanding global crises.The Defense Department is determined not to repeat the experience of the last major defense drawdown, in the late 1970s. That era produced what the Pentagon calls "a hollow force" -- understaffed, poorly equipped and demoralized."We didn't have enough people to do the job, and as we tried to do the job, we ran them into the ground," said Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, the new chief of naval operations.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent nTC | May 19, 1994
NORFOLK, Va. -- Straining under Pentagon cutbacks, U.S. military commanders are trying desperately to spare their troops unbearably long family separations as they respond to expanding global crises.The Defense Department is determined not to repeat the experience of the last major defense drawdown, in the late 1970s. That era produced what the Pentagon calls "a hollow force" -- understaffed, poorly equipped and demoralized."We didn't have enough people to do the job, and as we tried to do the job, we ran them into the ground," said Adm. Jeremy M. Boorda, the new chief of naval operations.
NEWS
By Newport News Daily Press | January 22, 1994
NORFOLK, Va. -- A female sailor who reported to the USS Yellowstone's sick bay with cramps early Sunday delivered a big surprise five minutes later: a baby boy. Officials believe it's the first time in U.S. naval history a sailor has given birth aboard ship.The woman, 21, a seaman apprentice assigned to the Norfolk-based destroyer tender, delivered what officials said was healthy, full-term, 5-pound boy early Jan. 16, said a spokesman for the Atlantic Fleet's Surface Force.The ship was in port at Gaeta, Italy, one month into a six-month assignment to the Mediterranean.
FEATURES
By Houston Chronicle | December 22, 1998
Millions of landlubbers have fallen under the spell of its pastel-colored paper money and plots of land from Mediterranean Avenue to Boardwalk.Now Monopoly is reeling in sailors with a new U.S. Navy edition and the opportunity to buy aircraft carriers and the Blue Angels in its first game dedicated to a military service.Dedicated to the men and women in the Navy, the game's pewter playing tokens include an anchor, jet fighter plane, sailor hat and a partially submerged submarine. Atlantic Fleet and Pacific Fleet cards replace the Chance and Community Chest cards in the Navy game.
NEWS
June 27, 1994
Frederick County's Liquor Commission fined Castle Liquors in Mount Airy $200 Wednesday for selling alcohol to a minor.The Prospect Road store was one of eight establishments caught in a mid-April sting by the Frederick County Sheriff's Office. Liquor commission members issued $2,350 in fines to the stores Wednesday.Hymiller is deployed in Mediterranean SeaNavy Seaman Recruit Scott H. Hymiller recently departed for a six-month Mediterranean deployment aboard the amphibious transport dock USS Austin, based in Norfolk, Va., as part of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington Joint Task Group.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In the pre-dawn darkness of Oct. 14, 1996, the USS Theodore Roosevelt was maneuvering in the choppy Atlantic waters 100 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C. The carrier was "backing down" -- reversing -- when it collided with a cruiser, the USS Leyte Gulf, in a thunderous screech of steel that knocked sailors to the decks and caused $10 million in damage.In the Navy, the reverberations of that October night are still being felt.The commander of the carrier, Rear Adm. Ronald L. Christenson, a 1969 Naval Academy graduate, was later judged to be the most culpable for the collision and received a punitive letter of reprimand in November 1996, usually a career-ender.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
The first woman who qualified to fly Navy combat aircraft has been reassigned to fly a cargo jet in a support squadron, Navy officials said yesterday.Lt. Shannon Workman, 28, who was removed from the USS Eisenhower in January because she had trouble landing her EA-6B radar jamming jet on the aircraft carrier, is to report in April to the Naval Air Station in Norfolk to train as a pilot on the cargo plane, said Cmdr. Kevin Wensing, a spokesman for the Atlantic Fleet.Lieutenant Workman, a 1988 Naval Academy graduate from Cumberland, was taken off the Eisenhower after officials found her carrier landings to be inconsistent.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Armed Services Committee will review the Pentagon's decision to keep intact the promotion of a Navy officer who commanded an aircraft carrier that was blamed for a 1996 collision that caused $10 million damage.Committee staff members asked the Navy Department late last week for its reports on the incident involving the carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt and the cruiser USS Leyte Gulf.The staff members also asked the Navy Department to explain why it chose to retain Rear Adm. Ronald L. Christenson at his current rank, said a spokesman.
NEWS
July 5, 1999
Adm. Isaac Campbell Kidd Jr., 79, who topped off a 40-year Navy career by becoming an authority on the law of the sea, died of prostate cancer June 27 at his home in Alexandria, Va.He retired in 1978 as commander in chief of the Atlantic Fleet and supreme commander of NATO forces in the Atlantic. He then put his expertise to work for various public agencies in Washington, lectured widely on maritime law in the United States and abroad and taught a course on the subject at the College of William and Mary.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
The commander of a guided missile frigate was relieved of command this week after allegedly fraternizing with a female Naval Academy midshipman who was on a summer training cruise.Vice Adm. Douglas J. Katz removed Cmdr. James H. McKinney Jr., 40, skipper of the Norfolk-based USS Nicholas for 10 months, Monday "after losing confidence in Commander McKinney's judgment and ability to continue in command," said Archie Galloway, a spokesman with the Atlantic fleet. He declined to release further details.
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