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By Ken Rosenthal | August 5, 1996
ATLANTA -- A woman stuck her head into a souvenir stand on International Boulevard and asked, "Got any Day 9 pins?"Vendor Mark Fahy shook his head no."It's gone from the country," he said, in only mild overstatement.Day 9 was the day of the Centennial Park bombing. And of the daily commemorative pins sold and traded at the Olympics, Day 9 was perhaps the most in demand as the Games came to an end.Vendors sold them for $25 to $40. Fahy said yesterday that collectors on the street were getting as much as $90. Another vendor said he heard a price of $100.
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By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 23, 2005
ATLANTA - With a slight tremor in his voice, convicted bomber Eric Rudolph apologized yesterday for people maimed or killed by a pipe bomb packed with nails that he planted amid a crowd during the 1996 Olympics. "Responsibility for what took place in the park that night belongs to me and me alone," said Rudolph, 38. "I would do anything to take that night back. To those victims, I do apologize." In a chilly, nondescript courtroom, Rudolph's victims stood before him: A college instructor in a tweed jacket suddenly thrust his hand into the air to show Rudolph the stump where his index finger had been blown off. A retired federal agent called Rudolph an "isolated cancer of mankind."
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- They're lucky it wasn't worse, lucky it didn't happen in the middle of the day, lucky it was only a homemade bomb.One is dead and 111 are injured. But at the most disorganized Olympics in recent memory, a far greater number of people is at risk.Too many people, too little space, too crazy a world. Even if the Games were running as smoothly as possible, they'd still be unmanageable.When $301 million worth of security is still not enough to ensure safety, are the Olympics really worth the trouble?
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | September 16, 2000
As I watched the U.S. gymnastics trials on NBC last month with my family, I remarked that the best thing about going to the Olympics is that I wouldn't have to watch the network's plausibly live, dead-on-arrival coverage of the Games. The promos and programming were so dreadful four years ago, I stopped watching the Atlanta Olympics. The joys of live TV hit home Wednesday, my first full day in Sydney and the day soccer competition began. I ordered a late dinner in the small restaurant that adjoins our hotel, and ignored my meal while the men's match between Australia and Italy wound down on the overhead TV. The Italians turned a counter attack into the only goal with about 10 minutes remaining.
SPORTS
By SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
North Baltimore Aquatic Club teammates and friends of Beth Botsford turned out more than 100 strong at BWI Airport last night to welcome home the Olympic swimming champion.The Garrison Forest School sophomore was greeted by balloons and signs proclaiming, "We Love You, Beth" and "Congratulations, Beth Botsford, Gold Medal(s) Winner." The "s" was inserted after she won her second gold."The week was exciting and fun, like nothing I had ever done before," said Botsford, who won the 100-meter backstroke and swam the leadoff backstroke leg in the 400 medley relay.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | August 1, 1996
Never let it be said that Baltimoreans blindly follow the herd.Olympic ratings so far have been blockbuster across the country, but just a little less so here through the first 11 days of the Games, according to numbers provided by Channel 11's Sharon Walz, the station's ratings researcher.Through Monday, the Olympics drew a 20.7 household rating and 37 share in prime time, a remarkably healthy number, but just below the 22.7/43 national average through the same date.Nonetheless, station officials have claimed the gold.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
ATLANTA -- American distance star Janet Evans didn't bow out exactly the way she wanted to last night, but she was determined to go out with class if she couldn't go out in style.Evans finished a disappointing sixth in her signature race -- the 800-meter freestyle -- and turned the event over to brash 16-year-old Brooke Bennett, who won the gold medal to establish herself as the world's premier female long-distance swimmer."I'm happy to be done," said Evans, who won three gold medals at the 1988 Olympics and a fourth in 1992.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- Tom Brands is from Iowa. He wrestles. He lists chain saws as a form of relaxation. He prefers moose hunting in Alaska to sitting on a beach in Hawaii. He likes to mash opponents' faces into a mat.And the scary thing is, he has an identical twin brother who is even more intense.Yesterday, Brands followed in the footsteps of an Iowa legend and won a freestyle wrestling gold medal at the Centennial Summer Olympics. He beat Jang Jae-Sung of South Korea in the 136.5-pound final, 7-0.But he wasn't entirely satisfied.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 1996
ATLANTA -- The people came. The blood was gone. And as music played once again yesterday at Centennial Olympic Park, a lost piece of Olympic spirit was reborn.Moving through a legion of armed security, about 3,000 spectators flooded the park for a morning ceremony to honor victims of the Olympic bombing and to reopen the popular park.With some on edge, some laughing, some still angry, the crowd seemed bent on sending a message to the person who did this: You can attack us. You can bloody our sidewalks and send terror through our hearts.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
ATLANTA -- Dan O'Brien wants to make up for not getting to Barcelona, Spain, four years ago. Michael Johnson wants to make up for what happened once he got there.Today, both will get their chance.O'Brien, who failed to get to the 1992 Olympics after no-heighting during the pole vault portion of the decathlon at the U.S. track and field trials, and Johnson, who failed to reach the final in the 200 meters there after coming down with food poisoning, each took a step toward permanently erasing those dark memories.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 22, 2000
Imagine a nautical parade of flags in the Inner Harbor as part of the Olympic opening ceremonies, Cal Ripken lighting an Olympic flame atop Federal Hill, giant video screens showing the parade of athletes on the National Mall in Washington. Imagine America's newest Mary Lou Retton winning gold medals in gymnastics at the new Baltimore Arena. The electricity of gold-medal soccer matches at PSINet Stadium. The emotion of a U.S.-Cuba gold-medal baseball game at Camden Yards. When first proposed, the idea of a two-city bid for the 2012 Olympics seemed impractical.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1997
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- A year after her Olympics triumph, Baltimore's Beth Botsford has a new goal.Botsford will compete for a berth on the U.S. team that will go to the World Championships in Perth, Australia, in January during the Phillips 66 National Swimming Championships that begin a seven-day run here today.Botsford, who captured the 100-meter backstroke in the Atlanta Olympics and swam the backstroke leg on the winning U.S. 400 medley relay team, needs a first or second in the 100 or 200 backstroke, her specialties, to make the U.S. team.
SPORTS
August 5, 1996
Final medal count.. .. .. .. .. ..G . ..S .. ..B .. .. .Tot.U.S. .. .. .. ..44 ...32 .. .25 .. .. ..101Germany .. .. ..20 ...18 .. .27 .. .. ...65Russia .. .. ...26 ...21 .. .16 .. .. ...63China .. .. .. .16 ...22 .. .12 .. .. ...50Australia .. .. .9 .. .9 .. .22 .. .. ...40France .. .. ...15 .. .7 .. .15 .. .. ...37Italy .. .. .. .13 ...10 .. .12 .. .. ...35South Korea .. ..7 ...15 .. ..5 .. .. ...27Cuba .. .. .. ...9 .. .8 .. ..8 .. .. ...25Ukraine .....
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
ATLANTA -- Keith Brantly trained in the heat of South Florida. Mark Coogan ran in the Rockies. And, because of injuries, U.S. Olympic trials champion Bob Kempainen barely put in any miles at all.The three Americans in yesterday's men's marathon had different methods to their madness for getting ready to compete tTC in the 1996 Olympics, but none was prepared for what they faced between 19 and 24 miles."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
ATLANTA -- Josia Thugwane overcame some steep hills and 95 percent humidity yesterday to win the men's marathon at the 1996 Olympic Games, becoming the first black South African to earn an Olympic gold medal. But what Thugwane survived here in the final track and field event of the competition paled in comparison with what he experienced five months ago at home.There, Thugwane literally fought for his life.Driving between the towns of Bethel, where his wife and four daughters live, and Kriel, about six miles away, Thugwane's car was stopped by four men who robbed him at gunpoint.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | August 5, 1996
You had to wade through treacly features and "is it or isn't live" to get there, but in its final Olympic telecast day, NBC delivered a remarkably moving day of sports television yesterday.In the morning, the network followed an Afghan runner who finished the men's marathon two hours after much of the field. The tendency might have been to mock the man, but anchor Jim Lampley instead gave the runner the dignity he deserved for finishing the task he started.The highlight of NBC's day was a beautifully filmed, 45-minute documentary -- presented without commercial interruption -- on five Americans, decathlete Rafer Johnson, sprinter Wilma Rudolph, basketball players Jerry West and Oscar Robertson and boxer Muhammad Ali, who excelled at the 1960 Olympics in Rome.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
ATLANTA -- Krista Reese stood behind a metal barricade and peered across the 6-foot-high fence. She glimpsed two tiny American flags tucked behind a sound and light tower. She examined the Olympic bomb site."I'm just so angry," the 42-year-old Atlanta native said yesterday. "I can't really put this into words. But somebody died there. And now we've got to go back in."Today, the Centennial Summer Games will return to Centennial Olympic Park. The gates will open at 8 a.m. Two hours later, former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, an ordained minister, will lead a service to remember the two people who died and the 111 who were injured in Saturday morning's pipe bomb explosion.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | July 29, 1996
ATLANTA -- Just when you thought it was safe to discard your old "Better Dead Than Red" buttons, the Cold War is staging a comeback.True, it's only baseball.But as Cuban coach Jorge Fuentes said after yesterday's 10-8 victory over the United States, "I expect there to be a great party in Havana tonight."The Cubans shouldn't get carried away -- they blew an eight-run lead, and likely will need to defeat the U.S. team again Friday for the gold medal.This game merely served as Act I, offering proof that the United States can play with the Cubans, who haven't lost in major international competition since 1987.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
ATLANTA -- Six years after receiving news that it would host the 1996 Olympic Games, 16 days after the competition officially began, Atlanta said its long goodbye last night with a nearly three-hour closing ceremony at Olympic Stadium. It matched the emotions from the past two weeks: uplifting on one hand, heart-wrenching on the other.The central theme of the show was a down-home Southern Jamboree. But with a moment of silence after a poignant speech from Juan Antonio Samaranch, president of the International Olympic Committee, it also was used to honor the memory of the two people who died as a result of the pipe bomb blast eight days ago at Centennial Park.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1996
ATLANTA -- It came out of nowhere. It was the punch of the Olympics.David Reid, beaten and battered by Cuba's Alfredo Duvergel for two rounds, unloaded a short right hand to score a shocking knockout, 36 seconds into the final round yesterday to claim the gold in the 156-pound final at the Centennial Summer Games."
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