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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
ATLANTA -- The most pampered athletes of the Summer Olympics will be bathed in ice-cold water, shaded by trees and portable mesh structures and observed by a high-priced, world-class medical staff armed with thermometers and salt supplements.We're talking about horses.At the 1996 Olympics, destined to become the Games of Heat and Humidity, competitors and spectators will be blasted by Southern summer weather. But it's the horses who will be under the greatest stress in the sun during the rugged equestrian three-day event.
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SPORTS
December 25, 2006
ATLANTA -- The Carolina Panthers broke a four-game losing streak and all but ended Atlanta's playoff hopes yesterday, beating the Falcons, 10-3, by shutting down the league's top running attack. The Falcons, who lead the league with 193 rushing yards per game, were outrushed 183-83 by a balanced attack that helped fill-in quarterback Chris Weinke end a 17-game losing streak as a starter. The Falcons (7-8) lost their last four home games of the season for the first time since 1989. On his first carry, Atlanta's Michael Vick rushed for 17 yards to become the first NFL quarterback to rush for 1,000 yards in a season.
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NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- They came to Atlanta, 42,000 strong, not in search of Olympic glory but to lend a hand as volunteers.Yesterday, just hours after a pipe bomb ripped through a country's spirit, those volunteers were back to work -- checking bags, taking tickets, giving directions."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
INDIANAPOLIS - If Beth Botsford makes another Olympic swim team tomorrow night, she'll be ecstatic. If she doesn't, she'll still be a happy sophomore at the University of Arizona, a teen-ager whose idea of an escape is a long Sunday drive into the Santa Catalina Mountains in search of a good piece of pie. "I'm a sucker for the sun," Botsford said. "It's never cold in Tucson; it never rains. I could live out there and be a happy girl all my life. This is the most fun I've had in years."
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
There's still almost a year to go before the torch is lighted at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, but already Chris Shead is feeling the heat sure as a hamburger on a hot Georgia grill.The Columbia businessman and father of three has responsibility for recommending how fast food giant McDonald's will promote and operate restaurants to feed 10,000 hungry athletes and their coaches and trainers in the Olympic Village next summer. Around the clock.The Olympic Village project is just one of the duties that Mr. Shead (pronounced shed)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- A year on tour, two weeks in the spotlight, and now, the U.S. women's basketball team is right where it wants to be:In the gold medal game at the Summer Olympics.Yesterday, Team USA battered Australia, 93-71, in front of 31,854 at the Georgia Dome. The victory set up tomorrow's gold-medal game with reigning world champion Brazil, an 81-60 winner over Ukraine.Center Lisa Leslie led the Americans with 22 points and 13 rebounds. Katrina McClain added 18 points and 15 rebounds, and Sheryl Swoopes added 16 points.
NEWS
September 24, 1993
The International Olympic Committee voted, in the end, to hold the Summer Games of 2000 in winter. It opted for stability over political anxiety. It succumbed to infrastructure in place rather than grandiose building plans.The IOC chose a favored small country that hosted the games in 1956 rather than the most populous country on earth or the first Islamic host. The IOC made the safe choice. It decided that the Games are for the athletes and not for statements about grand historical development.
SPORTS
November 7, 1991
IOC denies bribes gave Atlanta GamesAn International Olympic Committee vice president denied yesterday that bribes influenced the selection of Atlanta as host of the 1996 Games. Kevin Gosper said the IOC is doing all it can to reduce the risk of corruption in the bidding process.The accusations were raised this week by the German news magazine Der Spiegel, which claimed that Atlanta Olympic officials offered IOC members gold credit cards, free heart surgery, scholarships to American universities for their children and cash bribes of up to $120,000 each.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- Beth Botsford should know her way around the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center by now. It was the site of the Timonium 15-year-old's greatest failure, and now her greatest success.Botsford won her second gold medal at the XXVI Olympiad last night, swimming the first leg of the 4x100 medley relay for the victorious U.S. women's team to become the second backstroker from the North Baltimore Aquatic Club to win multiple gold and the third NBAC swimmer to win two or more Olympic medals.And she hasn't even taken part in her best event yet, the 200-meter backstroke, which she will tackle today.
NEWS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1995
Moving for the second time in four months to pre-empt the rest of the television industry from the marquee sporting event in the world, NBC yesterday locked up Olympic telecasts for the Summer Games of 2004 and 2008 and the Winter Games of 2006 for a combined bid of $2.3 billion.Yesterday's announcement came after the network -- which will carry the Atlanta Games next summer -- already had committed $1.25 billion to the International Olympic Committee in August to get the Summer Olympics of 2000 in Sydney, Australia, and the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City in 2002, bringing its outlay to the IOC to $3.55 billion.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1997
It's a moment that Dominique Dawes will not allow to haunt her. So Dawes will tell you there's really no need to watch the tapes of her all-around floor exercise from the 1996 Olympics. No need to reflect on the moment when, with the gold medal within her grasp, she stepped out of bounds. No need to shed any more tears than were shed that night, a night when many cried along with her."There's no need to watch something that I already did. I saw it, I was there," Dawes said last week. "I don't sit around and reflect on that.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- A year on tour, two weeks in the spotlight, and now, the U.S. women's basketball team is right where it wants to be:In the gold medal game at the Summer Olympics.Yesterday, Team USA battered Australia, 93-71, in front of 31,854 at the Georgia Dome. The victory set up tomorrow's gold-medal game with reigning world champion Brazil, an 81-60 winner over Ukraine.Center Lisa Leslie led the Americans with 22 points and 13 rebounds. Katrina McClain added 18 points and 15 rebounds, and Sheryl Swoopes added 16 points.
NEWS
July 29, 1996
TERRORISM, that hydra-headed monster, has an capacity to kill, to hurt, to frighten, to enrage and eventually to stiffen the resolve of the specific victims or larger society against which it is aimed.Because the means for inflicting appalling damage are so easily available to sophisticated guerrillas as well as lone loonies, it is feckless to assume a magic method can to found to stop terrorism. But that in no way should inhibit government from fighting back in ways that still protect American freedoms.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- They came to Atlanta, 42,000 strong, not in search of Olympic glory but to lend a hand as volunteers.Yesterday, just hours after a pipe bomb ripped through a country's spirit, those volunteers were back to work -- checking bags, taking tickets, giving directions."
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Rod Bratton and his family left one tragedy last week and headed right into another.The family is from Montoursville, Pa., and Bratton, his wife, Jeanne, and their two teen-age sons knew most of the 21 people from that town who died in the crash of TWA Flight 800.The Brattons were sitting at a table late yesterday afternoon outside Olympic Stadium, waiting to get into the second night of the track and field competition. Just as what happened to their neighbors and friends on Flight 800 will not prevent them from flying in the future, what happened here early yesterday at Centennial Olympic Park will not deter them from attending the 1996 Olympic Games.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- Beth Botsford should know her way around the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center by now. It was the site of the Timonium 15-year-old's greatest failure, and now her greatest success.Botsford won her second gold medal at the XXVI Olympiad last night, swimming the first leg of the 4x100 medley relay for the victorious U.S. women's team to become the second backstroker from the North Baltimore Aquatic Club to win multiple gold and the third NBAC swimmer to win two or more Olympic medals.And she hasn't even taken part in her best event yet, the 200-meter backstroke, which she will tackle today.
SPORTS
July 31, 1991
Disabled rally for Paralympics in '96Leaders of the disabled sports community are pushingAtlanta Olympic officials to play host to the Paralympics even though it was left out of the budget for the 1996 Games.The Paralympics are a multimillion-dollar festival for 3,000 athletes that has been held in conjunction with every Olympics since 1960.Los Angeles' 1984 bid, however, did not include the Paralympics, which were split that year between New York and England.It's also not in the budget for the Atlanta Games, and spokesman Bob Brennan said, "The cost seems prohibitive unless someone provides the funding, and we don't have anyone coming in to give us money for this."
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1997
It's a moment that Dominique Dawes will not allow to haunt her. So Dawes will tell you there's really no need to watch the tapes of her all-around floor exercise from the 1996 Olympics. No need to reflect on the moment when, with the gold medal within her grasp, she stepped out of bounds. No need to shed any more tears than were shed that night, a night when many cried along with her."There's no need to watch something that I already did. I saw it, I was there," Dawes said last week. "I don't sit around and reflect on that.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
ATLANTA -- Marylanders who attend the Olympics are likely to be surprised by a familiar sight.Now crisscrossing the streets of Georgia's capital city are public transit buses that look suspiciously like the ones in Maryland.The state's Mass Transit Administration agreed to lend 40 buses to Atlanta for use during the Olympics, which start today and run through Aug. 4. It's part of a nationwide effort in which 50 public transit agencies lent 1,450 buses to Atlanta to transport athletes and spectators to sports venues, downtown hotels, parking lots and other destinations.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
ATLANTA -- The most pampered athletes of the Summer Olympics will be bathed in ice-cold water, shaded by trees and portable mesh structures and observed by a high-priced, world-class medical staff armed with thermometers and salt supplements.We're talking about horses.At the 1996 Olympics, destined to become the Games of Heat and Humidity, competitors and spectators will be blasted by Southern summer weather. But it's the horses who will be under the greatest stress in the sun during the rugged equestrian three-day event.
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