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By Laura Barnhardt | January 14, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesAhead of The GamesIn anticipation of consumer interest in the 1996 Centennial Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Ga., the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games has put together a 32-page color catalog of official Olympic apparel and accessories, sporting goods and collectibles. Among the items are 14-karat gold pens, playing cards, T-shirts, posters, pennants, tote bags and foodstuff. A portion of the proceeds from every Olympic licensed item sold will help support the Atlanta committee and the U.S. Olympic Team.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sandy Banisky contributed to this article | August 1, 1996
ATLANTA -- The federal probe of Olympic bomb suspect Richard Jewell intensified yesterday, as investigators combed through the two-bedroom, $485-a-month suburban apartment the security guard shares with his mother.Investigators hauled several cardboard boxes from the apartment in Dekalb County and towed away Jewell's blue Toyota pickup.No arrests were made as investigators continue to search for clues to the Saturday morning pipe bomb explosion in Centennial Olympic Park that left one dead and wounded 111. A European TV cameraman rushing to the scene also died of a heart attack.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 1994
The State of Georgia will begin developing a 72-acre Olympic park in downtown Atlanta on a site now occupied largely by distressed residential and commercial properties, despite the protests of residents who would be displaced.At a news conference last week with Mayor Bill Campbell of Atlanta and Olympic officials, Gov. Zell Miller said he had decided to endorse the plan, which was proposed by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games, the private corporation that will stage the 1996 Olympics.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Peter Schmuck and Jean Marbella and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- Some went, as Southerners traditionally have gone in times of crisis, to church. Others sought out their neighbors where they've always found them, on their front porches, at the weekend breakfast spot or in the local watering hole. Even the out-of-towners were compelled to gather, at the sporting events that had drawn them here in the first place.No one wanted to face yesterday alone, not after the early morning bombing at Centennial Olympic Park that ripped a hole through the midpoint of the Summer Olympics.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
ATLANTA -- Put 10,000 athletes, 2 million visitors and the world's largest sporting event into an American city in the heat of summer, and what do you get?Sporadic outbreaks of chaos.Though the centennial Summer Olympics may look great on television, behind the scenes, they are a sweat-soaked, problem-filled production.Transportation foul-ups, computer breakdowns and athlete fury forced the Atlanta organizing committee to move quickly yesterday to fix the Games before they spiral from typical Olympic mayhem into a major sporting malfunction.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
THE GLOW IN THE SKY is not Atlanta burning but the gold of the greatest Olympiad with the most athletes in the most events watched by the most people ever. The long preparations, hype, controversies and commercialization are receding in shadow. The athletes' time is at hand.This is the Olympics to which everyone came, reported variously as 10,000 to 16,000 athletes, more than one-third of them women, from 197 nations and non-nations (a dozen more than the U.N.). The Cold War of boycotts and ostracisms is over.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- They came to Atlanta, 42,000 strong, not in search of Olympic glory but to lend a hand as volunteers.Yesterday, just hours after a pipe bomb ripped through a country's spirit, those volunteers were back to work -- checking bags, taking tickets, giving directions."
NEWS
By New York Times | April 9, 1991
ATLANTA -- When Atlanta pulled off the remarkable coup of being chosen to host the 1996 summer Olympics, it marked the jTC culmination of a zealous marketing effort aimed at portraying an image of unity, prosperity and racial harmony.So much for the easy part. Now, as the $1.2 billion effort to stage the games gears up, it is occurring in a place that seldom bears much resemblance to the idealized blend of Martin Luther King Jr. and Scarlett O'Hara sold to the International Olympic Committee.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- The moment Kerri Strug decided to attempt the final vault of the women's gymnastics team competition, despite the throbbing in her injured ankle, the Atlanta Olympic Games had its first indelible moment.Unfortunately, that image of heroism was overtaken early yesterday morning by the grim effects of cowardice in downtown Centennial Park.The Olympics continued, although not as carefree, not as innocent. Atlanta moved forward cautiously, knowing that only the competitions could salvage the city.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- You have sat by your television watching the Dream Team and Kerri Strug. You now understand the intricacies of beach volleyball. You suddenly have this craving to watch field hockey at 2 in the morning.You ask yourself: Do I get in a car, or hop on a plane, do I dare venture to the Centennial Summer Olympics without tickets and a hotel reservation?The experts in all of this have a ready answer: Just do it."Come on down," says Bill Crane, of Atlanta's Chamber of Commerce. "We've got tickets.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- The moment Kerri Strug decided to attempt the final vault of the women's gymnastics team competition, despite the throbbing in her injured ankle, the Atlanta Olympic Games had its first indelible moment.Unfortunately, that image of heroism was overtaken early yesterday morning by the grim effects of cowardice in downtown Centennial Park.The Olympics continued, although not as carefree, not as innocent. Atlanta moved forward cautiously, knowing that only the competitions could salvage the city.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- They came to Atlanta, 42,000 strong, not in search of Olympic glory but to lend a hand as volunteers.Yesterday, just hours after a pipe bomb ripped through a country's spirit, those volunteers were back to work -- checking bags, taking tickets, giving directions."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Ken Rosenthal and Bill Glauber and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1996
ATLANTA -- An explosion rocked the heart of Centennial Olympic Park early this morning shortly after a bomb scare, injuring scores of people, according to Atlanta Fire Department officials.Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell told NBC that one person was confirmed dead and 50 to 60 were injured.An unidentified spokeswoman said that 150 to 200 people were injured about 1: 15 a.m.A morgue attendant at the Fulton County medical examiner's office, R. Green, said he was told by the bomb squad that four people had been killed.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- You have sat by your television watching the Dream Team and Kerri Strug. You now understand the intricacies of beach volleyball. You suddenly have this craving to watch field hockey at 2 in the morning.You ask yourself: Do I get in a car, or hop on a plane, do I dare venture to the Centennial Summer Olympics without tickets and a hotel reservation?The experts in all of this have a ready answer: Just do it."Come on down," says Bill Crane, of Atlanta's Chamber of Commerce. "We've got tickets.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
ATLANTA -- Put 10,000 athletes, 2 million visitors and the world's largest sporting event into an American city in the heat of summer, and what do you get?Sporadic outbreaks of chaos.Though the centennial Summer Olympics may look great on television, behind the scenes, they are a sweat-soaked, problem-filled production.Transportation foul-ups, computer breakdowns and athlete fury forced the Atlanta organizing committee to move quickly yesterday to fix the Games before they spiral from typical Olympic mayhem into a major sporting malfunction.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
THE GLOW IN THE SKY is not Atlanta burning but the gold of the greatest Olympiad with the most athletes in the most events watched by the most people ever. The long preparations, hype, controversies and commercialization are receding in shadow. The athletes' time is at hand.This is the Olympics to which everyone came, reported variously as 10,000 to 16,000 athletes, more than one-third of them women, from 197 nations and non-nations (a dozen more than the U.N.). The Cold War of boycotts and ostracisms is over.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sandy Banisky contributed to this article | August 1, 1996
ATLANTA -- The federal probe of Olympic bomb suspect Richard Jewell intensified yesterday, as investigators combed through the two-bedroom, $485-a-month suburban apartment the security guard shares with his mother.Investigators hauled several cardboard boxes from the apartment in Dekalb County and towed away Jewell's blue Toyota pickup.No arrests were made as investigators continue to search for clues to the Saturday morning pipe bomb explosion in Centennial Olympic Park that left one dead and wounded 111. A European TV cameraman rushing to the scene also died of a heart attack.
NEWS
By Allen Tullos & Candace Waid | October 21, 1991
Atlanta -- HEREABOUTS, lately, time and patience are wearing thin. Thin as the patina on Ashley Wilkes' last good pair of Sunday pants. Ashley is mostly dead now since Alexandra Ripley, that "Scarlett" woman, finished with him. At least she left him tan and married off to a spare English widow.It was when we were lined up and reading our way to the cash register in the book section at Rich's Department Store at Perimeter Mall that we began to feel something had gone terribly wrong. "She's killed Mammy!"
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
ATLANTA -- Its image has changed dramatically over the years: from a town that rebuilt itself after being burned to the ground during the Civil War to a city that became the center of the New South and a symbol of relative civility in a region with a history of racial divisiveness.Atlanta hasn't quite become as cosmopolitan as some of its prominent citizens might lead you to believe, but it's certainly more glitz than grits these days. After six years of hype, the 1996 Summer Olympics open here Friday night.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | January 14, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesAhead of The GamesIn anticipation of consumer interest in the 1996 Centennial Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Ga., the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games has put together a 32-page color catalog of official Olympic apparel and accessories, sporting goods and collectibles. Among the items are 14-karat gold pens, playing cards, T-shirts, posters, pennants, tote bags and foodstuff. A portion of the proceeds from every Olympic licensed item sold will help support the Atlanta committee and the U.S. Olympic Team.
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