Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAtkins Diet
IN THE NEWS

Atkins Diet

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2004
ROME - At the peak of her fame in the 1960s, Italian actress Sophia Loren was asked to share beauty secrets. Gesturing toward her shapely figure, she replied, "Everything you see is because of pasta." Times change. Loren is now co-starring with an enormous, slobbering dog in a popular commercial on Italian television, and pasta is in the doghouse, too, thanks to the Atkins diet and America's current terror of carbohydrates. Which explains why a group of nearly 300 scientists, chefs and nutritionists met in Rome last week to debunk myths about pasta's alleged nutritional deficiencies, and celebrate what is Italy's version of soul food.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | December 27, 2007
The low-carb Atkins diet that raged last decade may not be the weight-loss juggernaut it once was, but it still has adherents and even a new book. And the controversial diet that promotes high-fat meats and cheeses over breads and pastas is still generating questions from the medical community. In a recently released study, a group of researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center says it might help people drop pounds but also might hurt the heart. The group compared three popular eating regimens -- Atkins, the low-carb and low-fat South Beach Diet and the vegetarian Ornish diet.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 2003
Millions of Americans have lost an untold amount of weight by sticking to Dr. Robert Atkins' high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. Now, food companies and retailers are hoping for similar happy results by focusing on products that fit the Atkins plan. But some of those sales gains are coming at the expense of companies whose foods aren't compatible with Atkins. The winners include the makers and sellers of meat snacks such as beef jerky that have few or no carbohydrates. But bread bakers and the makers of the once-trendy high-carbohydrate energy bars are feeling the pinch as more and more Americans turn to the Atkins plan.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | May 21, 2007
Let me be blunt about something, and if this is too blunt and offends your delicate sensibilities, well, that's just too bad and you should get over it. OK, here goes: I don't want to hear about your diet. Diet stories are boring, OK? And your diet story is boring, too. So, just because it's May and you're trying to lose weight like everyone else so you don't look like a big tub of goo in a swimsuit this summer, don't think I want to hear about it. Because I don't. Oh, I know you think your diet story is different.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,Los Angeles Times | August 17, 2003
Giving up bread and pasta is one thing. But chocolate? It's simply unimaginable for some dieters trying to slash their carb intake. Realizing this, candy makers and other food companies are marketing low-carbohydrate chocolates for those on the Atkins diet and other eating plans that restrict starchy and sugary foods. Dieters can choose among mint patties, peanut butter cups, toffee squares and even old-fashioned chocolate bars. But though the labels may be new, the low-carb treats are no different from many sugar-free chocolates that diabetics have been buying for years.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | January 28, 2004
The low-carbohydrate bandwagon rolled onto York Road some weeks ago, hauling pasta, chips, candy bars, ice cream, pancake and bread mixes. The merchandise costs more than enough, but consider the promise, the new beginning, the new you. Marketeers refer to the low-carb "lifestyle," which seems mostly to be a thing demanding accessorizing. The new La Vida Lo-Carb store stands ready to provide the stuff tossed ashore by this latest dieting tsunami. Mark the low-carbohydrate spaghetti at $3.29 for an 8-ounce box, nearly three times the price of the standard brand.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | December 27, 2007
The low-carb Atkins diet that raged last decade may not be the weight-loss juggernaut it once was, but it still has adherents and even a new book. And the controversial diet that promotes high-fat meats and cheeses over breads and pastas is still generating questions from the medical community. In a recently released study, a group of researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center says it might help people drop pounds but also might hurt the heart. The group compared three popular eating regimens -- Atkins, the low-carb and low-fat South Beach Diet and the vegetarian Ornish diet.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 25, 2004
You recently wrote about a link between black cohosh and liver problems. I have a friend who has had hepatitis C for 23 years. She had been taking black cohosh for menopausal hot flashes, but her liver enzymes were high. When I read your column I e-mailed her, and she quit taking the herb. Today she phoned to tell me her liver enzymes are now down significantly. She credits quitting the black cohosh for this dramatic improvement. We both thank you. We are delighted to learn that your friend had such a positive outcome.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
Casting fresh doubt on a widely held dietary belief, a new study of low-carbohydrate diets found that eating higher amounts of fat doesn't increase cardiac risk. The report in today's New England Journal of Medicine also found that consuming higher amounts of vegetable fat greatly reduced the chance of heart disease. The findings mean "you don't have to restrict everything to lose weight or reduce your risk for heart disease," said Kathleen Rigol, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association who was not connected with the study.
NEWS
By John Fauber and John Fauber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 27, 2004
The secret to long life might be a Mediterranean-style diet with exercise and a little alcohol, according to a study likely to cause a gulp of uncertainty among Atkins-style dieters. The study, one of the first to look at the individual and combined effects of diet and lifestyle in older people, found a 23 percent reduction in deaths over a 10-year period among those who followed a Mediterranean diet. Similar reductions in deaths also were found among those who consumed moderate amounts of alcohol, primarily wine, at 22 percent lower; engaged in regular physical activity, 37 percent; and did not smoke, 35 percent.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
If you go on a low-carbohydrate diet to shed weight, you've probably made a good decision, according to a new report by Stanford University researchers. Just don't expect miracles. In the largest head-to-head study of competing diets so far, low-carb plans such as the Atkins Diet turned out to be safe and effective for losing weight and improving cardiovascular health - at least in the short run. In fact, women who aggressively restricted carbs lost nearly twice as much weight over six months as women on higher-carb diets, the Journal of the American Medical Association reported today.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2006
Casting fresh doubt on a widely held dietary belief, a new study of low-carbohydrate diets found that eating higher amounts of fat doesn't increase cardiac risk. The report in today's New England Journal of Medicine also found that consuming higher amounts of vegetable fat greatly reduced the chance of heart disease. The findings mean "you don't have to restrict everything to lose weight or reduce your risk for heart disease," said Kathleen Rigol, a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association who was not connected with the study.
NEWS
December 9, 2005
Pharmacology FluMist study finds few big problems A government study has found no fatalities or unexpected side effects among 2.5 million people who took FluMist in the two influenza seasons since the nasal-spray vaccine was licensed, according to this week's Journal of the American Medical Association. Since June 2003, doctors have reported 460 problems including flu-like illnesses, allergic reactions, ear, nose and throat symptoms and fatigue. The vaccine, made by MedImmune Vaccine Inc. of Gaithersburg, is intended for healthy people ages 5 to 49. Serious problems were few, and were no more common than problems among those taking traditional, injected flu vaccine.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
All the attention paid to the Atkins diet didn't much faze Bradley T. MacDonald, even though the competing weight-loss program hurt sales at his Owings Mills business last year. He was certain it wouldn't last - in fact, he suspected the attention would do Atkins in. "I saw problems when Atkins started Atkin-izing TGI Fridays" in 2003, he said. "At that point, you knew that there was problems." Yesterday, his hunch proved true. Atkins Nutraceuticals Inc. - founded on the controversial low-carb, full-fat diet pioneered by the late Dr. Robert C. Atkins - filed for bankruptcy protection in New York, unable to survive its strategy of going after a mass market and purporting to be a lifestyle.
NEWS
By John Fauber and John Fauber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 27, 2004
The secret to long life might be a Mediterranean-style diet with exercise and a little alcohol, according to a study likely to cause a gulp of uncertainty among Atkins-style dieters. The study, one of the first to look at the individual and combined effects of diet and lifestyle in older people, found a 23 percent reduction in deaths over a 10-year period among those who followed a Mediterranean diet. Similar reductions in deaths also were found among those who consumed moderate amounts of alcohol, primarily wine, at 22 percent lower; engaged in regular physical activity, 37 percent; and did not smoke, 35 percent.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 2004
Obesity rates are rising, but science has barely weighed in on the best way for people to shed fat. That state of affairs is starting to change, and doctors are getting a surprise or two. Last month, the popular carb-slashing Atkins diet received a dollop of endorsement from two studies after years of being pooh-poohed by health specialists. The studies, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, showed that the meat- and fat-rich regimen caused faster weight loss in the short term than a conventional low-fat diet.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 2004
Obesity rates are rising, but science has barely weighed in on the best way for people to shed fat. That state of affairs is starting to change, and doctors are getting a surprise or two. Last month, the popular carb-slashing Atkins diet received a dollop of endorsement from two studies after years of being pooh-poohed by health specialists. The studies, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, showed that the meat- and fat-rich regimen caused faster weight loss in the short term than a conventional low-fat diet.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
If you go on a low-carbohydrate diet to shed weight, you've probably made a good decision, according to a new report by Stanford University researchers. Just don't expect miracles. In the largest head-to-head study of competing diets so far, low-carb plans such as the Atkins Diet turned out to be safe and effective for losing weight and improving cardiovascular health - at least in the short run. In fact, women who aggressively restricted carbs lost nearly twice as much weight over six months as women on higher-carb diets, the Journal of the American Medical Association reported today.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 25, 2004
You recently wrote about a link between black cohosh and liver problems. I have a friend who has had hepatitis C for 23 years. She had been taking black cohosh for menopausal hot flashes, but her liver enzymes were high. When I read your column I e-mailed her, and she quit taking the herb. Today she phoned to tell me her liver enzymes are now down significantly. She credits quitting the black cohosh for this dramatic improvement. We both thank you. We are delighted to learn that your friend had such a positive outcome.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2004
ROME - At the peak of her fame in the 1960s, Italian actress Sophia Loren was asked to share beauty secrets. Gesturing toward her shapely figure, she replied, "Everything you see is because of pasta." Times change. Loren is now co-starring with an enormous, slobbering dog in a popular commercial on Italian television, and pasta is in the doghouse, too, thanks to the Atkins diet and America's current terror of carbohydrates. Which explains why a group of nearly 300 scientists, chefs and nutritionists met in Rome last week to debunk myths about pasta's alleged nutritional deficiencies, and celebrate what is Italy's version of soul food.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.