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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 14, 2006
Athol Fugard's Statements After an Arrest Under the Immorality Act is a romantic tragedy written in response to mid-20th-century South African legislation that prohibited interracial sexual relations. Seen halfway around the world three decades after its premiere, the play still resonates, but this time it may suggest relationships most American legislation doesn't deign to recognize. Like tragedies dating back to the Greeks, the end of Statements is evident from the beginning -- in this case, a glimpse of a mixed-race couple immediately after love-making.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 14, 2006
Athol Fugard's Statements After an Arrest Under the Immorality Act is a romantic tragedy written in response to mid-20th-century South African legislation that prohibited interracial sexual relations. Seen halfway around the world three decades after its premiere, the play still resonates, but this time it may suggest relationships most American legislation doesn't deign to recognize. Like tragedies dating back to the Greeks, the end of Statements is evident from the beginning -- in this case, a glimpse of a mixed-race couple immediately after love-making.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 3, 1997
The great South African playwright Athol Fugard has always had a gift for putting large-scale ideas in small-scale plays."Valley Song," his two-actor, three-character drama currently at Washington's Kennedy Center, is his first play since the election of Nelson Mandela. A touching account of a grandfather and granddaughter, on the surface this is a play about a young girl's efforts to break away from the rural village where she was raised, but on a deeper level, it is a commentary on a young democracy's struggles to find its way.It's also one of the loveliest, most joyous works Fugard's ever written.
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By SARAH KICKLER KELBER | July 16, 2006
TSOTSI -- Miramax Home Entertainment -- $29.99 When screenwriter-director Gavin Hood gave his acceptance speech for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film for Tsotsi earlier this year, it wasn't about him. "Please stand up, Presley Chweneyagae and Terry Pheto, my two fantastic young leads," he said during his speech. "Put the cameras on them, please." And for good reason. While the story - which Hood adapted from the only novel written by famed South African playwright Athol Fugard - is gripping, it's these two actors who make the film, out on DVD Tuesday, believable and real.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 28, 2002
Athol Fugard play at Vagabond Players Athol Fugard's rawly confessional 1982 play, Master Harold ... and the Boys, opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players. Set in 1950, in a tearoom in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, the charged drama focuses on the relationship between two black waiters and the white teen-age son of the tearoom's owners. Under Steve Yeager's direction, the Vagabonds' production stars Michael A. Kane, G. Scott Spence and Alex Borinsky. Show times at the Vagabonds, 806 S. Broadway, are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays and 7 p.m. March 29. The play runs through March 30. Tickets are $12. For more information, call 410-563-9135.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 16, 2002
Everyman Theatre's 2002-2003 season will take audiences from post-Nazi Germany to South Africa at the height of apartheid to a small-town Minnesota high school reunion. "I'm particularly pleased with the blend," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi said of the five-play season. "We've got two Baltimore premieres [Ronald Harwood's Taking Sides and Craig Wright's The Pavilion]; we've got two modern American classics [Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance and Moss Hart's Light Up the Sky], and then an Athol Fugard [My Children!
NEWS
By SARAH KICKLER KELBER | July 16, 2006
TSOTSI -- Miramax Home Entertainment -- $29.99 When screenwriter-director Gavin Hood gave his acceptance speech for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film for Tsotsi earlier this year, it wasn't about him. "Please stand up, Presley Chweneyagae and Terry Pheto, my two fantastic young leads," he said during his speech. "Put the cameras on them, please." And for good reason. While the story - which Hood adapted from the only novel written by famed South African playwright Athol Fugard - is gripping, it's these two actors who make the film, out on DVD Tuesday, believable and real.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 8, 2000
Four Baltimore premieres and a revival of an American classic will make up the 10th anniversary season at Everyman Theatre. The five-play roster includes one more production than has been the norm for the theater's past four seasons. And, as a further sign of growth, Everyman is adding a second weekly matinee. The plays, all dating from the second half of the 20th century, take theatergoers from a small South African village to the Harlem Renaissance and will include the theater's first co-production with the Baltimore School for the Arts -- a collaborative mounting of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 31, 2000
Everyman Theatre launches its 10th anniversary season Wednesday with Athol Fugard's "The Road to Mecca." Based on a real-life South African visionary artist named Helen Martins, the play examines artistic freedom in a repressive country. Tana Hicken stars as Miss Helen, under the direction of her husband, Donald Hicken. The cast also includes Deborah Hazlett and John Dow. The Sept. 6-7 performances are pay-what-you-can previews. Both shows begin at 8 p.m. The official opening night is Sept.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | September 27, 2007
I saw a production of My Children! My Africa! at Studio Theatre in Washington the other night, and it broke my heart. In 1984, Athol Fugard wrote a play about racial tensions exploding at a high school in apartheid South Africa. His drama is a powerful lament about the shameful waste of bright, shining young lives. If you go My Children! My Africa! runs through Oct. 21 at the Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. N.W., Washington. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m., 7 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 16, 2002
Everyman Theatre's 2002-2003 season will take audiences from post-Nazi Germany to South Africa at the height of apartheid to a small-town Minnesota high school reunion. "I'm particularly pleased with the blend," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi said of the five-play season. "We've got two Baltimore premieres [Ronald Harwood's Taking Sides and Craig Wright's The Pavilion]; we've got two modern American classics [Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance and Moss Hart's Light Up the Sky], and then an Athol Fugard [My Children!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 28, 2002
Athol Fugard play at Vagabond Players Athol Fugard's rawly confessional 1982 play, Master Harold ... and the Boys, opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players. Set in 1950, in a tearoom in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, the charged drama focuses on the relationship between two black waiters and the white teen-age son of the tearoom's owners. Under Steve Yeager's direction, the Vagabonds' production stars Michael A. Kane, G. Scott Spence and Alex Borinsky. Show times at the Vagabonds, 806 S. Broadway, are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays and 7 p.m. March 29. The play runs through March 30. Tickets are $12. For more information, call 410-563-9135.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 8, 2000
Four Baltimore premieres and a revival of an American classic will make up the 10th anniversary season at Everyman Theatre. The five-play roster includes one more production than has been the norm for the theater's past four seasons. And, as a further sign of growth, Everyman is adding a second weekly matinee. The plays, all dating from the second half of the 20th century, take theatergoers from a small South African village to the Harlem Renaissance and will include the theater's first co-production with the Baltimore School for the Arts -- a collaborative mounting of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 3, 1997
The great South African playwright Athol Fugard has always had a gift for putting large-scale ideas in small-scale plays."Valley Song," his two-actor, three-character drama currently at Washington's Kennedy Center, is his first play since the election of Nelson Mandela. A touching account of a grandfather and granddaughter, on the surface this is a play about a young girl's efforts to break away from the rural village where she was raised, but on a deeper level, it is a commentary on a young democracy's struggles to find its way.It's also one of the loveliest, most joyous works Fugard's ever written.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER | December 17, 1991
MY CHILDREN! My Africa!", Athol Fugard's three-character play running at Center Stage through Sunday, is an ideal educational tool. The play deals with apartheid and its terrible effects on two South African high school students -- one black, one white -- and the black teacher who encourages their friendship.Center Stage, much to its credit, staged a free matinee for 540 city middle and high school students last Thursday. The students arrived by bus and stayed after the 10:30 a.m. performance for a question-and-answer session with the three actors: Moses Gunn, who plays the teacher brilliantly; Victor Mack and Kathleen McNenny, who play the students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 13, 2003
Asmall item in a South African newspaper about an assault on a teacher was the impetus for Athol Fugard's 1989 play My Children! My Africa! Set four years earlier, the three-character play concerns an idealistic teacher in one of the black townships who initiates a debate between his prized male pupil and a white female student. The charged drama opens tonight at Everyman Theatre. Direction is by Donald Hicken, who, in addition to his directorial credits, brings plenty of classroom experience to this assignment, thanks to his position as head of the theater department at the Baltimore School for the Arts.
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