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NEWS
By Allen Barra | September 25, 1990
OF THE MAKING of reforms," Confucius is said to have said, "there is no end." With regard to college sports, he might have added: Especially when the reforms are half-hearted.If the National Collegiate Athletic Association is serious about making reforms in college sports, there's one sweeping measure that is simple, fair and economically advantageous: Do away with athletic scholarships.Scarcely a week goes by without news of some fresh scandal involving the football programs at our major schools.
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NEWS
August 28, 2014
To those who follow college athletics only casually, the announcement last week that the University of Maryland will henceforth award athletic scholarships on a multi-year basis instead of year-to-year may sound like a minor change. But in fact, it's a major reform that is not only welcome but is likely to attract a legion of imitators. From the effort to unionize athletes at Northwestern University as school employees (a year-long struggle that remains ongoing) to the legal fight over whether the NCAA can profit from the images of athletes in video games and elsewhere without compensating them, how colleges and universities treat athletes — or mistreat them — has sparked a pitched battle of late.
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NEWS
August 28, 2014
To those who follow college athletics only casually, the announcement last week that the University of Maryland will henceforth award athletic scholarships on a multi-year basis instead of year-to-year may sound like a minor change. But in fact, it's a major reform that is not only welcome but is likely to attract a legion of imitators. From the effort to unionize athletes at Northwestern University as school employees (a year-long struggle that remains ongoing) to the legal fight over whether the NCAA can profit from the images of athletes in video games and elsewhere without compensating them, how colleges and universities treat athletes — or mistreat them — has sparked a pitched battle of late.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland men's soccer coach Sasho Cirovski has seen more than a dozen of his players leave school early to pursue professional careers. The departures have often left Cirovski to wonder whether his former athletes would eventually come back to finish their undergraduate degrees. With a new program announced Tuesday by Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, athletes in all of the school's sports will be able to return with their scholarships intact as long as they left the university in good academic and social standing.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2000
Athletic scholarships are "extremely limited, and should not be the focus of athletic participation in high school," concluded a report given last week to the Howard County Board of Education by county Coordinator of Athletics Don Disney. Disney's report was requested by the Board of Education to "compare and contrast the athletic scholarships to academic and service scholarships." Disney used figures from the 1999 and 2000 school years. The bottom line is this: There is more money available in academic and service scholarships than athletic scholarships.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
A Baltimore County mother is suing St. Paul's School for Boys and two administrators for $150,000, claiming that her son was bullied for years by other students and the school did nothing to protect him. In a lawsuit claiming breach of contract and negligence, Nannette Krupa of Nottingham argues that the school in Brooklandville effectively expelled her son a half-year before he was due to graduate while not disciplining other students, including some...
NEWS
October 22, 1993
The Black Coaches Association met the other day with the Congressional Black Caucus to discuss ways of changing some of the regulations and practices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The coaches feel that blacks have been excluded from leadership roles in the NCAA, and that decisions regarding such things as the size of staffs and the number of scholarships have been harmful to black youths.Many of the items on the black coaches' bill of particulars are right on target, but one is not. That is their opposition to raising admissions standards for athletes.
NEWS
January 16, 1992
University presidents appear to be in charge of football and basketball on their campuses. They should be, and it's about time. For years it has been clear that on some campuses, at least, many athletes were students in name only. Entrance requirements were laughably low or non-existent, as was required scholastic progress after matriculation. The presidents began to reassert themselves in the early 1980s, and gradually they have made real progress against those athletic directors and alumni groups who oppose any reform that might weaken a team's won-loss record.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - The NCAA decision allowing a 12th Division I-A football game will do little to ease the growing fiscal woes of college athletics, members of a watchdog group said yesterday. The Knight Commission, which met yesterday, expressed concern that college sports spending is far outpacing spending of other campus programs. "It's clear that all those interested in the future of intercollegiate athletics must find a way to bridle escalating expenses," said Wake Forest president Thomas Hearn, who presided over his first meeting as chairman of the reform-minded group.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
I have a Florida vacation coming up with a new boyfriend, and I don't know how to swim. Where is a good place to take private lessons and learn quickly? I have three weeks. While you may not be able to wow your new beau with swan dives and a flawless backstroke in three weeks, you should have enough time to cover the basics - assuming you aren't afraid of the water. Cathy Lears, director of the North Baltimore Swim School at Meadowbrook, says fear of the water is the most common obstacle for beginners.
NEWS
By Darleen Sanford | June 4, 2014
This week's news seems mostly all about winners. Everybody wants to be a winner and it's nice when everyone can win. Sometimes struggling to compete makes you a winner even without a trophy or ribbon. Congratulations to all who struggle in the race of life. You know who you are. Keep pressing on. The Amanda Post Memorial Fund was established to honor one who struggled and lived with enthusiasm. This is the fifth year of the Amanda Post Amanda Wins River Hill High School Student-Athlete Scholarship and the Amanda Post Amanda Wins Soccer Association of Columbia/Howard County Student-Athlete Scholarship.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | November 12, 2012
Mount St. Mary's will discontinue three of its Division I athletics teams in 2013 in an effort to reduce its athletics budget while expanding its existing programs. Men's soccer, along with men's and women's golf, will cease after the 2012-13 academic year. As many as 30 Mount student-athletes will be affected by the elimination of the three sports, as well as one full-time and three part-time coaching positions. The decision will save the university more than $400,000 annually. "This is a decision we didn't want to make, but the budget realities require it to protect and reinvest in our remaining Division I programs," university President Thomas H. Powell said.
SPORTS
June 3, 2012
He earned it, take it Chris Dufresne Los Angeles Times This ranks as one of the dumbest concocted "controversies" in the history of concocted controversies in new-world media. Of course rich man mogul "Diddy" Combs could pay for son Justin's education at UCLA, but the fact is athletic scholarships are not give-aways ... they are to be earned. If my Daddy was as rich as Diddy, I'd want very much to make my own way in the world. That should be the story.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
A Baltimore County mother is suing St. Paul's School for Boys and two administrators for $150,000, claiming that her son was bullied for years by other students and the school did nothing to protect him. In a lawsuit claiming breach of contract and negligence, Nannette Krupa of Nottingham argues that the school in Brooklandville effectively expelled her son a half-year before he was due to graduate while not disciplining other students, including some...
SPORTS
By From staff and news services | March 25, 2011
Consumer advocate Ralph Nader is calling for the elimination of college athletic scholarships, saying the move is necessary to "de-professionalize" college athletes. "As we near the exciting conclusion of 'March Madness' — which would more accurately be described as the 2011 NCAA Professional Basketball Championships — it's time we step back and finally address the myth of amateurism surrounding big-time college football and basketball in this country," said Nader, whose League of Fans is proposing that the scholarships be replaced with need-based financial aid. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the proposal Thursday, ahead of its official release.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,sandra.mckee@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
It wasn't Valerie Cooper's dream to become a school administrator when she was a three-sport athlete in the 1970s. But here she is today, sitting behind a desk at Aberdeen High, an assistant principal who enjoys her job and draws constantly on the lessons she learned from her experiences as a student-athlete at Bel Air. "Sports teaches real-life skills," she said. "It teaches how to cooperate with people and be respectful. It teaches you things you need in the work place, in college: to be on time, to be dependable.
SPORTS
By Jeremy Licht and Jeremy Licht,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2003
Johns Hopkins enjoys the prominence of a seven-time NCAA Division I champion lacrosse program and the comfort of a Division III athletic program that is immune to many of the ills of the NCAA's highest echelon. It is a rare dichotomy that has suited the school well for 30 years, but it could be coming to an end. The Division III Presidents Council approved a reform package on Thursday that might force Hopkins to choose one division once and for all. One proposal would eliminate an exception that allows Hopkins and seven other Division III schools to offer athletic scholarships to athletes playing on their Division I teams.
NEWS
January 13, 1995
The National Collegiate Athletic Association voted overwhelmingly this week to raise academic requirements for students receiving athletic scholarships. That's the good news. The bad news is the NCAA decided to delay implementing the higher standards for a year.The worst news is that this fight over standards continues to be a racial one. Black political activists, black (and white) coaches at many big state and private universities, as well as athletic directors and coaches at smaller, predominantly black schools, believe that using high school grades and, especially, standardized admissions tests to determine eligibility for athletic scholarships discriminates against blacks.
SPORTS
May 11, 2008
Straight Shooters answers your youth lacrosse questions with the help of US Lacrosse experts. This week's "Straight Shooter" is Matt Zash. Zash was a two-time All-America midfielder at Duke, graduating in 2006. He plays professional lacrosse for Major League Lacrosse's Philadelphia Barrage and the National Lacrosse League's New York Titans. Zash was a member of the 2003 United States under-19 men's world championship team and played for Team USA in the 2007 Indoor World Lacrosse Championships in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | November 8, 2006
Joanna Strickland never doubted that her three children would go to college. But sending them could have been a burden for the Mount Airy family. Four years at Maryland for oldest daughter Marche, four at Indiana for son Marshall and another four for youngest daughter Marah could have amounted to some $250,000 in tuition, room and board. That might have required a second loan against the house and almost certainly would have consigned the children to student loan debt. Instead, when Marah Strickland, a senior at Towson Catholic, confirms her plans to attend school in College Park today, she will be the third Strickland child to accept a full basketball scholarship.
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