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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - She's the marathoner on a long journey to the Olympics, running for nearly a year without proper shoes because they were burned by rampaging militiamen, keeping alive a flickering dream by jogging barefoot on soft sand through East Timor's scorched landscape. And then, in June, an International Olympic Committee vice president named Kevan Gosper traveled from Australia to the ravaged capital of Dili, taking along a red felt pen he used to trace the racer's foot on a piece of paper and vowing to send her a new pair of running shoes to take her to the Games.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 13, 2014
Perhaps you missed ... a regional National Labor Relations Board decision that ruled Northwestern University's football players are "employees" subject to union representation. And before you dismiss this decision as the ravings of some bureaucrat laborite, remember that the appeal goes to the full Barack Obama-controlled board, now simply a satellite operation for the AFL-CIO. My readers can figure out the myriad problems with this concept on their own, but allow me one simple illustration of the awkwardness involved.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
That chronic groin pain sometimes felt by athletes may be called a sports hernia, but it's not really a hernia at all, according to Dr. Katherine G. Lamond, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She said they are different from what's normally thought of as a hernia and sometimes tough to diagnose. But once doctors determine that this is the cause, there is effective treatment. What is the difference between a sports hernia and other types of hernias?
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Oakland Athletics closer Jim Johnson struggled once again Wednesday, but the offense bailed him out in extra innings in a 7-4 win over the Minnesota Twins at Target Field. With a 4-2 lead entering the bottom of the ninth, Johnson allowed a single to the Twins' Jason Kubel and walked Kurt Suzuki before getting the first out. The former Orioles closer then walked Aaron Hicks to load the bases and gave up an RBI single to Eduardo Escobar before being removed from the game. Right-hander Dan Otero entered for Johnson and gave up a sacrifice fly to Minnesota's Brian Dozier to tie the game, 4-4. Otero pitched the final 2 2/3 innings to pick up the win. Johnson's ERA rose to 18.90 after his third rough outing in five appearances this season.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Of the 445 high school track and field athletes selected to participate in the prestigious Penn Relays, 14 attend schools in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The Penn Relays high school individual event field, released early Tuesday, includes 30 total athletes from Maryland high schools, who will compete in events ranging from the mile run to the shot put. Four All-Metro Player of the Year winners from this academic year were included among the 14 local athletes who earned spots in the relays.
EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
Five students at St. Vincent Pallotti High were named to All-MIAA teams for spring sports. Senior midfielder Billy Rodgers was named for B Conference lacrosse and senior Justin Clatworthy was named for B Conference golf. Juniors Matt Defrank (short stop) and Corey Dirks (catcher and pitcher), together with senior Jackson Souder (pitcher, third base, first base) were named All-MIAA for B Conference baseball.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
It has become part of college sports -- as ingrained as dunks and FieldTurf -- for large universities to accept prized basketball and football recruits and other athletes under more forgiving admissions criteria than are used for other students. Less understood is what happens to these top athletes once they arrive in their college classrooms. Do their grades ever catch up to those of their teammates or the rest of the student body? Do they remain in school and graduate? Interviews and documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun through more than a dozen public records requests, offer a rare profile of hundreds of these athletes and show that the "special admits" typically have not performed as well as other players in the classroom and pose unique and expensive academic challenges at the University of Maryland, North Carolina State, Georgia Tech and other schools.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 1, 2014
The advent of cable television gave universities vast opportunities to profit from football and basketball, and the large and most lucrative programs dominate the national championship tournaments and earn huge sums. Northwestern's football program reaped an $8 million profit on its $30 million in revenue during the 2012-13 season, for example, and it is hardly a perennial powerhouse like Notre Dame or Alabama. Yet student athletes - who are expected to train year-round and work 40 to 60 hours a week during the season - receive only scholarships for tuition, room and board and limited expenses.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Of the 445 high school track and field athletes selected to participate in the prestigious Penn Relays, 14 attend schools in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The Penn Relays high school individual event field, released early Tuesday, includes 30 total athletes from Maryland high schools, who will compete in events ranging from the mile run to the shot put. Four All-Metro Player of the Year winners from this academic year were included among the 14 local athletes who earned spots in the relays.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 4, 2014
College swimming and diving Towson High alumna Felicia Lee wins 2014 Honda Sports Award Stanford senior Felicia Lee was named the Honda Sports Award winner for swimming and diving, presented annually to the top female athlete in the sport. With the honor, Lee, a Towson High alumna, becomes a finalist for the Collegiate Woman Athlete of the Year and the 2014 Honda Cup. Lee earned seven All-America honors at the NCAA championships while capturing five titles. She finished first in the 100-meter butterfly and in the 200- and 400-meter freestyle relays and the 200- and 400-meter medley relays.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Salisbury coach Jim Berkman is as candid as any coach in lacrosse. That honesty came through as he discussed the No. 2 Sea Gulls' surprising 8-7 overtime loss to Capital Athletic Conference foe Christopher Newport on Wednesday. “We didn't get it done on Wednesday,” Berkman said Friday morning. “We just weren't sharp. We weren't passing and catching well. We talked about a trap game all week, and we didn't play well. We threw numerous balls out of bounds playing catch with guys next to us on Wednesday that we hadn't done all season.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
For Brooke Griffin , every moment on the lacrosse field is a joy. The Maryland attacker revels in each slick dodge to goal, each pinpoint pass that finds a teammate's stick, each little celebration of a Terps score. For Brooke Griffin , every moment on the lacrosse field is a joy. The Maryland attacker revels in each slick dodge to goal, each pinpoint pass that finds a teammate's stick, each little celebration of a Terps score. She loves all the scrimmages, all the drills and all the wall ball that have helped put her on the Tewaaraton Award watch list as one of the top players in the college women's game.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 1, 2014
The advent of cable television gave universities vast opportunities to profit from football and basketball, and the large and most lucrative programs dominate the national championship tournaments and earn huge sums. Northwestern's football program reaped an $8 million profit on its $30 million in revenue during the 2012-13 season, for example, and it is hardly a perennial powerhouse like Notre Dame or Alabama. Yet student athletes - who are expected to train year-round and work 40 to 60 hours a week during the season - receive only scholarships for tuition, room and board and limited expenses.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Smoking near a playground, swimming pool or ball field in Baltimore could bring a fine of up to $500 under a ban the City Council approved Monday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is expected to sign the legislation, which would make Baltimore the latest local government to ban lighting up near places where children play. The ban would not apply to all of the city's parkland, but would prohibit smoking within 50 feet of recreational areas, such as a schoolyard, baseball diamond or basketball court.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 8, 2011
Well, that one struck a nerve. Write a column listing the coolest athletes ever to play in Maryland and you expect to get reaction. Oh, did I get reaction. My in-box blew up. I got phone calls. A guy cornered me at the 7-Eleven and said: "Two words: No Rick Dempsey?" "That's three words," I said. "And how did you get past my security detail?" Then I remembered I didn't have a security detail. But back to the list, which appeared in Thursday's column and was a direct rip-off of GQ magazine's list of 25 all-time coolest athletes.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 16, 2014
Under Armour will outfit all Naval Academy varsity teams starting in the 2014-2015 season, the Baltimore-based sports brand announced Thursday. The agreement with the Naval Academy Athletic Association, which makes Under Armour official outfitter of all 33 men's and women's teams, also includes marketing and promotional opportunities. The affiliation is Under Armour's 12th Division 1 all-school partnership. "Under Armour is extremely proud to outfit the outstanding men and women who not only represent our home state of Maryland but also uphold the highest standards of the true student-athlete," Matt Mirchin, Under Armour executive vice president of global marketing, said in the announcement.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
GREENSBORO, N.C. - The pained look Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson has worn for most of the past two months has had more to do with his recovery from knee replacement surgery than what he endured watching the Terps men's basketball team's disappointing season. The solemn look was there Thursday, but this time it had more to do with the Terps' losing another close game than with his new knee. Anderson, who signed Mark Turgeon to an eight-year contract after Gary Williams retired suddenly in March 2011, said he still has faith that the Terps will turn it around.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel, For The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
North Harford quarterback Nic Hammer enjoyed being a leader during his two years as a starter. He often served as a coach on the field, constantly helping answer teammates' questions about their assignments. Hammer knew those answers because he studied and learned the entire offensive playbook. That's why he became such a strong leader for the Hawks, and a big reason he was one of the winners at the 51st Annual Scholar Athlete Awards Dinner Wednesday at Martin's West. The Greater Baltimore Chapter of the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame holds this dinner annually and four other players received the same honor.
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