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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - She's the marathoner on a long journey to the Olympics, running for nearly a year without proper shoes because they were burned by rampaging militiamen, keeping alive a flickering dream by jogging barefoot on soft sand through East Timor's scorched landscape. And then, in June, an International Olympic Committee vice president named Kevan Gosper traveled from Australia to the ravaged capital of Dili, taking along a red felt pen he used to trace the racer's foot on a piece of paper and vowing to send her a new pair of running shoes to take her to the Games.
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NEWS
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Sidney Anne Willson, a stellar multisport athlete who went on to help her son run a horse-breeding farm in Howard County, died in her sleep Tuesday of natural causes at Shady Grove Center in Rockville. She was 87. In addition to tennis, a sport in which she won tournaments all along the East Coast during the 1940s and 1950s, the former Sidney Adams played lacrosse and, after taking it up in middle age, excelled in golf. "I have never beaten her in golf my entire life," said her son, Art Willson, of Woodbine.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
It has become part of college sports -- as ingrained as dunks and FieldTurf -- for large universities to accept prized basketball and football recruits and other athletes under more forgiving admissions criteria than are used for other students. Less understood is what happens to these top athletes once they arrive in their college classrooms. Do their grades ever catch up to those of their teammates or the rest of the student body? Do they remain in school and graduate? Interviews and documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun through more than a dozen public records requests, offer a rare profile of hundreds of these athletes and show that the "special admits" typically have not performed as well as other players in the classroom and pose unique and expensive academic challenges at the University of Maryland, North Carolina State, Georgia Tech and other schools.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 9, 2014
Boxing Crews wins Police Athletic League middleweight title Franchon Crews of Baltimore captured the National Police Athletic League middleweight championship Saturday in Oxnard, Calif., winning by technical knockout in the second round against former Baltimorean Danielle Mitchell , now of North Hollywood, Calif. In the 165-pound semifinals, Crews won by TKO over Kira De Morales of San Pedro, Calif. Next, Crews will help her husband and training partner, Glenn Dezurn of Baltimore, prepare for his fifth professional fight, set for Oct. 24 in Somerset, N.J. Colleges Cirovski suspended for violating Big Ten sportsmanship policy Maryland men's soccer coach Sasho Cirovski was suspended one game Wednesday by the Big Ten Conference for violations of the conference's sportsmanship policy after the team's 3-2 overtime loss to Northwestern on Sunday.
EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
Five students at St. Vincent Pallotti High were named to All-MIAA teams for spring sports. Senior midfielder Billy Rodgers was named for B Conference lacrosse and senior Justin Clatworthy was named for B Conference golf. Juniors Matt Defrank (short stop) and Corey Dirks (catcher and pitcher), together with senior Jackson Souder (pitcher, third base, first base) were named All-MIAA for B Conference baseball.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 1, 2014
The advent of cable television gave universities vast opportunities to profit from football and basketball, and the large and most lucrative programs dominate the national championship tournaments and earn huge sums. Northwestern's football program reaped an $8 million profit on its $30 million in revenue during the 2012-13 season, for example, and it is hardly a perennial powerhouse like Notre Dame or Alabama. Yet student athletes - who are expected to train year-round and work 40 to 60 hours a week during the season - receive only scholarships for tuition, room and board and limited expenses.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
That chronic groin pain sometimes felt by athletes may be called a sports hernia, but it's not really a hernia at all, according to Dr. Katherine G. Lamond, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She said they are different from what's normally thought of as a hernia and sometimes tough to diagnose. But once doctors determine that this is the cause, there is effective treatment. What is the difference between a sports hernia and other types of hernias?
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 8, 2011
Well, that one struck a nerve. Write a column listing the coolest athletes ever to play in Maryland and you expect to get reaction. Oh, did I get reaction. My in-box blew up. I got phone calls. A guy cornered me at the 7-Eleven and said: "Two words: No Rick Dempsey?" "That's three words," I said. "And how did you get past my security detail?" Then I remembered I didn't have a security detail. But back to the list, which appeared in Thursday's column and was a direct rip-off of GQ magazine's list of 25 all-time coolest athletes.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Erin Michael ran the relay race in the Baltimore Running Festival last year and saw a few disabled racers — but thought there could be more. The 29-year-old therapist at Kennedy Krieger Institute encouraged and then helped train nine patients who finished the race Saturday. Michael ran the 5K, then raced back a mile to watch her proteges. "I was moved to tears during what was one of the proudest moments of my life," she said. "I saw several walking to the finish line and one rolling by on his bike.
NEWS
By Kayla Bawroski and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
You don't need to be a ballerina to get the muscle tone and posture of a dancer. At the Bel Air Athletic Club's barre class, you'll navigate the same waist-height handrail prima ballerinas use for warmups, no pointe shoes required. “With barre, it's really the perfect exercise for a woman's body,” says Lori Berry, a fitness instructor at Bel Air Athletic Club who teaches barre. “In the beginning, you use 3- to 5-pound weights, and again, it's isometric movements, so you may be working your biceps with a smaller range and it's less weight.” Whereas Pilates, a more commonly known workout, works with a smaller number of repetitions and focuses on the quality of the reps, barre is the opposite, according to Berry.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
Let's once and for all put to rest the idea that athletes and entertainers are "role models. " Every time I read or hear a parent say their son or daughter "really looks up to (fill in the blank)," I just want to vomit. I am not sure when this idea of celebrities "role models" came about, but it is time for it to end. Just because these individuals are high-profile doesn't mean they are worthy of admiration. They are highly paid and excel in their fields, but they are also human and can make poor decisions just like the rest of us. In just the last month Baltimore has seen no less than three high-profile athletes dominate the national news for making very stupid decisions.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - Mark Turgeon's two distinct memories of Len Bias have lasted three decades. The first occurred when Turgeon was a sophomore point guard at Kansas, sharing the same court at the Greak Alaskan Shootout with a junior rising star from Maryland. "Dunked on him," the Terps coach joked this week. In reality, Turgeon recalled how the muscular, 6-foot-8 power forward scraped his head on the bottom of the backboard after going in for a dunk. "That was the first time I had seen that," Turgeon said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
No lead is safe for the Towson football team. For the second time this season, the Tigers could not prevent an opponent from scoring in the final minute of regulation. On Saturday night, Maine drove 72 yards in 12 plays and 1 minute, 47 seconds to escape Johnny Unitas Stadium in Towson with a 27-24 win. An announced crowd of of 6,031 could only watch as the Black Bears - who snapped a two-game losing skid to improve to 2-2 overall and 1-0 in the Colonial Athletic Assocation - converted three fourth downs, including a 37-yard scoring strike from sophomore quarterback Dan Collins to sophomore wide receiver Jordan Dunn with 52 seconds remaining in regulation.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Ravens rookie linebacker C.J. Mosley lines up on every snap beside who he calls an “old-school” linebacker, Daryl Smith. On the opposite sideline Sunday, he'll cross paths with Panthers star Luke Kuechly, the 2013 Associated Press Defensive Player of the Year and the new standard for the athletic, three-down linebacker Mosley hopes to become. “[He's] one of the guys that can move around, make plays in the coverage and move sideline to sideline,” Mosley said. “Watching him at Boston College when I was at Alabama, then after he came out … [he made]
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Saturday's 31-20 victory over visiting North Carolina Central lifted Towson to a 2-2 record, marking their first time at .500 since the beginning of the season. The win also injected some much-needed confidence into the team, coach Rob Ambrose said Monday during his weekly conference call arranged by the Colonial Athletic Association. “These are college students with college-student problems and injuries,” he said. “Everybody's got problems. So it's about managing them as best we can and moving forward.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Big Ten announced Monday morning that Penn State junior cornerback Trevor Williams, a Calvert Hall graduate, is the conference's Defensive Player of the Week.   Williams, of Baltimore, intercepted two passes in the Nittany Lions' 13-10 victory over Rutgers on Saturday night, becoming the first Penn State player to have multiple interceptions in a game since 2010. He also made five tackles. Williams is one of three former Calvert Hall players in Penn State's secondary. Senior Adrian Amos is the Nittany Lions' starting strong safety and has been an honorable mention All-Big Ten selection the last two seasons.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 13, 2014
The "indefinite suspension" of Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice for knocking out his then-fiancée, now wife, in an elevator at an Atlantic City casino has again provoked debate about domestic violence and what the National Football League tolerates when it affects a star player. Ravens head coach John Harbaugh, who last spring testified to Mr.  Rice's good character, says a new video has "changed things. " Mr. Rice was initially suspended for two games after part of a video showed Mr. Rice dragging fiancée Janay Palmer from the elevator.
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