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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - She's the marathoner on a long journey to the Olympics, running for nearly a year without proper shoes because they were burned by rampaging militiamen, keeping alive a flickering dream by jogging barefoot on soft sand through East Timor's scorched landscape. And then, in June, an International Olympic Committee vice president named Kevan Gosper traveled from Australia to the ravaged capital of Dili, taking along a red felt pen he used to trace the racer's foot on a piece of paper and vowing to send her a new pair of running shoes to take her to the Games.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Before Friday night's game against the Oakland Athletics, Orioles manager Buck Showalter talked about how difficult it is to get a reliever back into a routine after the All-Star break. “It's always a tough time because you have bullpen guys who have had six, seven days off, and you're trying to get everybody back in the flow,” Showalter said. “It's hard. You don't even have this in the start of the season because you try to make sure everybody's got a couple days off, but not too many days off. This is always a tough time for bullpens around baseball, getting them in the flow.
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EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
Five students at St. Vincent Pallotti High were named to All-MIAA teams for spring sports. Senior midfielder Billy Rodgers was named for B Conference lacrosse and senior Justin Clatworthy was named for B Conference golf. Juniors Matt Defrank (short stop) and Corey Dirks (catcher and pitcher), together with senior Jackson Souder (pitcher, third base, first base) were named All-MIAA for B Conference baseball.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
OAKLAND, Calif. - Orioles closer Zach Britton hadn't allowed a run over his previous 10 outings heading into the ninth inning of Friday night's series opener against the Oakland Athletics, converting six straight save opportunities along the way. Britton had slid into the role of closer nicely in the first half of the season, but in his first appearance since the All-Star break, a save opportunity turned into a disaster in just six pitches....
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
That chronic groin pain sometimes felt by athletes may be called a sports hernia, but it's not really a hernia at all, according to Dr. Katherine G. Lamond, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She said they are different from what's normally thought of as a hernia and sometimes tough to diagnose. But once doctors determine that this is the cause, there is effective treatment. What is the difference between a sports hernia and other types of hernias?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Since a memorial service at a sweltering, standing-room only Cole Field House was held a few days after Len Bias' death in June 1986, there has been little official connection between the former basketball All-American and the University of Maryland. But nearly three decades after his fatal cocaine overdose, and the fallout that led to significant changes at the school, Bias will formally be recognized by Maryland when he is inducted posthumously into the Terps' athletics Hall of Fame.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 1, 2014
The advent of cable television gave universities vast opportunities to profit from football and basketball, and the large and most lucrative programs dominate the national championship tournaments and earn huge sums. Northwestern's football program reaped an $8 million profit on its $30 million in revenue during the 2012-13 season, for example, and it is hardly a perennial powerhouse like Notre Dame or Alabama. Yet student athletes - who are expected to train year-round and work 40 to 60 hours a week during the season - receive only scholarships for tuition, room and board and limited expenses.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Lauren Cox, the wife of Ravens long snapper Morgan Cox, was not amused by Drake's song about cheating athletes at the ESPYs this week. Cox wrote a rambling blog post Thursday titled " Drake, take your 'side pieces' and shove it " -- a sharp contrast to her other posts, which usually discuss Bible verses. It's a little hard to parse Cox's writing, but apparently she was incensed that the event celebrated Michael Sam coming out as the first openly gay current NFL player while Drake's performance made light of athletes' infidelities.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Since a memorial service at a sweltering, standing-room only Cole Field House was held a few days after Len Bias' death in June 1986, there has been little official connection between the former basketball All-American and the University of Maryland. But nearly three decades after his fatal cocaine overdose, and the fallout that led to significant changes at the school, Bias will formally be recognized by Maryland when he is inducted posthumously into the Terps' athletics Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
The Orioles' plan all along was to let Kevin Gausman loose in the second half of this season. It took some rigid discipline - limiting his innings and pitch counts earlier this year - in order to preserve him for the stretch run. It also included some unpopular roster moves as the right-hander shuttled back and forth to the minor leagues. When the Orioles needed an extra relief pitcher, Gausman usually was the player sent to manager Buck Showalter's office to be told he was being optioned.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
In May, Loyola Maryland's Joe Fletcher received the William C. Schmeisser Award as the nation's top defender. Now he has the hardware to show he brought that same intensity and dedication to the classroom, too. Fletcher was named the Patriot League Male Scholar-Athlete of the Year, an award voted on by conference member schools that honors the top performer in the classroom and in competition. Scholar-Athletes of the Year in their respective sports are eligible for the overall honor.
SPORTS
By Cristie Kerr | July 6, 2014
[Editor's note: Cristie Kerr, a member of Team USA in the inaugural LPGA International Crown to be played at Caves Valley Golf Club July 24-27, will be blogging about her experience for The Baltimore Sun.] There is something about international athletic competition that can't compare to anything else. The best of the best playing on the biggest stage for not only themselves but for their country. Right now, the World Cup has captured the attention of the entire world and with good reason.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 8, 2011
Well, that one struck a nerve. Write a column listing the coolest athletes ever to play in Maryland and you expect to get reaction. Oh, did I get reaction. My in-box blew up. I got phone calls. A guy cornered me at the 7-Eleven and said: "Two words: No Rick Dempsey?" "That's three words," I said. "And how did you get past my security detail?" Then I remembered I didn't have a security detail. But back to the list, which appeared in Thursday's column and was a direct rip-off of GQ magazine's list of 25 all-time coolest athletes.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
It has become part of college sports -- as ingrained as dunks and FieldTurf -- for large universities to accept prized basketball and football recruits and other athletes under more forgiving admissions criteria than are used for other students. Less understood is what happens to these top athletes once they arrive in their college classrooms. Do their grades ever catch up to those of their teammates or the rest of the student body? Do they remain in school and graduate? Interviews and documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun through more than a dozen public records requests, offer a rare profile of hundreds of these athletes and show that the "special admits" typically have not performed as well as other players in the classroom and pose unique and expensive academic challenges at the University of Maryland, North Carolina State, Georgia Tech and other schools.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
No one was more surprised than Katelyn Miller when the Bucknell graduate learned she had been named the Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association Division I Scholar-Athlete of the Year on Tuesday. Miller, who played high school lacrosse at McDonogh, had never even heard of the award -- the highest academic honor in college women's lacrosse. "I didn't even know this existed," Miller said with a laugh. "It was really exciting just because I always try to work my hardest whether I'm on the field or I'm in the classroom.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
I'm old enough to remember that it was a big deal when athletes were chosen to grace the front of a Wheaties box, yet I've never eaten a flake of it. General Mills would like to change that. The company has unveiled a promotion that, for the first time in the 90-year history of Wheaties, will allow the public to choose who's going on the iconic orange carton. The selection of athletes and the methodology show how General Mills is skewing younger with this promotion, the Wheaties Next Challenge . Lacrosse, the fastest-growing sport at the college and high school levels, gets a nod -- Rob Pannell, a former Cornell All-American and now a star with Major League Lacrosse's New York Lizards, is one of the five athletes up for the vote.
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