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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - She's the marathoner on a long journey to the Olympics, running for nearly a year without proper shoes because they were burned by rampaging militiamen, keeping alive a flickering dream by jogging barefoot on soft sand through East Timor's scorched landscape. And then, in June, an International Olympic Committee vice president named Kevan Gosper traveled from Australia to the ravaged capital of Dili, taking along a red felt pen he used to trace the racer's foot on a piece of paper and vowing to send her a new pair of running shoes to take her to the Games.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Towson released its first depth chart of the preseason Friday, and there were a couple notable surprises. The first entails the free safety position. Junior Christian Carpenter, an Aberdeen native and graduate who was a first-team All-Colonial Athletic Association selection last season, is second on the depth chart. Carpenter, who tied then-sophomore strong safety Donnell Lewis for the team lead in interceptions with four and ranked fourth in tackles with 98, has been leapfrogged by redshirt sophomore Jordan Mynatt.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland men's soccer coach Sasho Cirovski has seen more than a dozen of his players leave school early to pursue professional careers. The departures have often left Cirovski to wonder whether his former athletes would eventually come back to finish their undergraduate degrees. With a new program announced Tuesday by Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, athletes in all of the school's sports will be able to return with their scholarships intact as long as they left the university in good academic and social standing.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Under Armour is working to land NBA superstar Kevin Durant as a pitch man — a sponsorship deal that could be one of the largest ever signed and give the Baltimore company a major inroad into the lucrative basketball marketplace. Signing the popular Oklahoma City Thunder forward, who grew up playing basketball in Washington and Maryland and still has family in the region, would be a coup for Under Armour as it tries to build its shoe business and boost its stature internationally.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
That chronic groin pain sometimes felt by athletes may be called a sports hernia, but it's not really a hernia at all, according to Dr. Katherine G. Lamond, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She said they are different from what's normally thought of as a hernia and sometimes tough to diagnose. But once doctors determine that this is the cause, there is effective treatment. What is the difference between a sports hernia and other types of hernias?
EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
Five students at St. Vincent Pallotti High were named to All-MIAA teams for spring sports. Senior midfielder Billy Rodgers was named for B Conference lacrosse and senior Justin Clatworthy was named for B Conference golf. Juniors Matt Defrank (short stop) and Corey Dirks (catcher and pitcher), together with senior Jackson Souder (pitcher, third base, first base) were named All-MIAA for B Conference baseball.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 1, 2014
The advent of cable television gave universities vast opportunities to profit from football and basketball, and the large and most lucrative programs dominate the national championship tournaments and earn huge sums. Northwestern's football program reaped an $8 million profit on its $30 million in revenue during the 2012-13 season, for example, and it is hardly a perennial powerhouse like Notre Dame or Alabama. Yet student athletes - who are expected to train year-round and work 40 to 60 hours a week during the season - receive only scholarships for tuition, room and board and limited expenses.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Broadneck football coach Rob Harris took the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge twice. He's not on Facebook and didn't have proof of the first dousing, so he had ice water poured over his head a second time. That didn't bother him. Harris would take a few more ice water showers if it would raise additional money for research into the neurodegenerative disease at the heart of the challenge, a social media fundraising wave that has swept the country this month. Harris has a personal connection to ALS. His wife Sarah's uncle, Johnny O'Brien, a former Severna Park football player, was 56 when he died in January of the condition widely known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 19, 2014
Two recent major developments may revolutionize major college sports, potentially to the benefit of long-exploited college athletes. It's about time. On August 7 the National Collegiate Athletic Association decreed that the five major conferences - the University of Maryland's former and new conferences, the ACC and the Big Ten; plus the Big 12, PAC-12 and the SEC - shall have greater autonomy to develop policies that specifically meet their needs. Experts believe the five conferences' 65 member universities could, among other changes, begin to pay annual stipends for student-athletes and cover their tuition and other scholastic costs after their eligibility has expired.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland men's soccer coach Sasho Cirovski has seen more than a dozen of his players leave school early to pursue professional careers. The departures have often left Cirovski to wonder whether his former athletes would eventually come back to finish their undergraduate degrees. With a new program announced Tuesday by Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, athletes in all of the school's sports will be able to return with their scholarships intact as long as they left the university in good academic and social standing.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
OAKLAND, Calif. - Orioles closer Zach Britton hadn't allowed a run over his previous 10 outings heading into the ninth inning of Friday night's series opener against the Oakland Athletics, converting six straight save opportunities along the way. Britton had slid into the role of closer nicely in the first half of the season, but in his first appearance since the All-Star break, a save opportunity turned into a disaster in just six pitches....
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Before Friday night's game against the Oakland Athletics, Orioles manager Buck Showalter talked about how difficult it is to get a reliever back into a routine after the All-Star break. “It's always a tough time because you have bullpen guys who have had six, seven days off, and you're trying to get everybody back in the flow,” Showalter said. “It's hard. You don't even have this in the start of the season because you try to make sure everybody's got a couple days off, but not too many days off. This is always a tough time for bullpens around baseball, getting them in the flow.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 8, 2011
Well, that one struck a nerve. Write a column listing the coolest athletes ever to play in Maryland and you expect to get reaction. Oh, did I get reaction. My in-box blew up. I got phone calls. A guy cornered me at the 7-Eleven and said: "Two words: No Rick Dempsey?" "That's three words," I said. "And how did you get past my security detail?" Then I remembered I didn't have a security detail. But back to the list, which appeared in Thursday's column and was a direct rip-off of GQ magazine's list of 25 all-time coolest athletes.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 16, 2014
Under Armour will outfit all Naval Academy varsity teams starting in the 2014-2015 season, the Baltimore-based sports brand announced Thursday. The agreement with the Naval Academy Athletic Association, which makes Under Armour official outfitter of all 33 men's and women's teams, also includes marketing and promotional opportunities. The affiliation is Under Armour's 12th Division 1 all-school partnership. "Under Armour is extremely proud to outfit the outstanding men and women who not only represent our home state of Maryland but also uphold the highest standards of the true student-athlete," Matt Mirchin, Under Armour executive vice president of global marketing, said in the announcement.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Lauren Cox, the wife of Ravens long snapper Morgan Cox, was not amused by Drake's song about cheating athletes at the ESPYs this week. Cox wrote a rambling blog post Thursday titled " Drake, take your 'side pieces' and shove it " -- a sharp contrast to her other posts, which usually discuss Bible verses. It's a little hard to parse Cox's writing, but apparently she was incensed that the event celebrated Michael Sam coming out as the first openly gay current NFL player while Drake's performance made light of athletes' infidelities.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
Since a memorial service at a sweltering, standing-room only Cole Field House was held a few days after Len Bias' death in June 1986, there has been little official connection between the former basketball All-American and the University of Maryland. But nearly three decades after his fatal cocaine overdose, and the fallout that led to significant changes at the school, Bias will formally be recognized by Maryland when he is inducted posthumously into the Terps' athletics Hall of Fame.
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