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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - She's the marathoner on a long journey to the Olympics, running for nearly a year without proper shoes because they were burned by rampaging militiamen, keeping alive a flickering dream by jogging barefoot on soft sand through East Timor's scorched landscape. And then, in June, an International Olympic Committee vice president named Kevan Gosper traveled from Australia to the ravaged capital of Dili, taking along a red felt pen he used to trace the racer's foot on a piece of paper and vowing to send her a new pair of running shoes to take her to the Games.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Big Ten announced Monday morning that Penn State junior cornerback Trevor Williams, a Calvert Hall graduate, is the conference's Defensive Player of the Week.   Williams, of Baltimore, intercepted two passes in the Nittany Lions' 13-10 victory over Rutgers on Saturday night, becoming the first Penn State player to have multiple interceptions in a game since 2010. He also made five tackles. Williams is one of three former Calvert Hall players in Penn State's secondary. Senior Adrian Amos is the Nittany Lions' starting strong safety and has been an honorable mention All-Big Ten selection the last two seasons.
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EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
Five students at St. Vincent Pallotti High were named to All-MIAA teams for spring sports. Senior midfielder Billy Rodgers was named for B Conference lacrosse and senior Justin Clatworthy was named for B Conference golf. Juniors Matt Defrank (short stop) and Corey Dirks (catcher and pitcher), together with senior Jackson Souder (pitcher, third base, first base) were named All-MIAA for B Conference baseball.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 13, 2014
The "indefinite suspension" of Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice for knocking out his then-fiancée, now wife, in an elevator at an Atlantic City casino has again provoked debate about domestic violence and what the National Football League tolerates when it affects a star player. Ravens head coach John Harbaugh, who last spring testified to Mr.  Rice's good character, says a new video has "changed things. " Mr. Rice was initially suspended for two games after part of a video showed Mr. Rice dragging fiancée Janay Palmer from the elevator.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
It has become part of college sports -- as ingrained as dunks and FieldTurf -- for large universities to accept prized basketball and football recruits and other athletes under more forgiving admissions criteria than are used for other students. Less understood is what happens to these top athletes once they arrive in their college classrooms. Do their grades ever catch up to those of their teammates or the rest of the student body? Do they remain in school and graduate? Interviews and documents, obtained by The Baltimore Sun through more than a dozen public records requests, offer a rare profile of hundreds of these athletes and show that the "special admits" typically have not performed as well as other players in the classroom and pose unique and expensive academic challenges at the University of Maryland, North Carolina State, Georgia Tech and other schools.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College sophomore volleyball player Cynthia Jones of Gambrills won the National Junior College Athletic Association's Pinnacle Award for Academic Excellence with a 4.0 (out of 4) grade-point average, school officials said. Jones is among six AACC student athletes named to the national academic team. The other five athletes earned awards for Superior Academic Achievement: sophonore soccer goalkeeper Chellsea Clark-Ames of Pasadena, freshman volleyball player Caitlin Dea of Pasadena, sophomore lacrosse pleyer Olivia Pittman of Annapolis, sophomore softball player Erica Toth of Arnold and freshman cross country runner Kelsey Wagner of Shady Side.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | April 1, 2014
The advent of cable television gave universities vast opportunities to profit from football and basketball, and the large and most lucrative programs dominate the national championship tournaments and earn huge sums. Northwestern's football program reaped an $8 million profit on its $30 million in revenue during the 2012-13 season, for example, and it is hardly a perennial powerhouse like Notre Dame or Alabama. Yet student athletes - who are expected to train year-round and work 40 to 60 hours a week during the season - receive only scholarships for tuition, room and board and limited expenses.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
That chronic groin pain sometimes felt by athletes may be called a sports hernia, but it's not really a hernia at all, according to Dr. Katherine G. Lamond, assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She said they are different from what's normally thought of as a hernia and sometimes tough to diagnose. But once doctors determine that this is the cause, there is effective treatment. What is the difference between a sports hernia and other types of hernias?
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
University of Maryland teams posted their best Graduation Success Rate, 82 percent, in the most recent statistics announced Thursday. It was the third straight year that Maryland's GSR has risen. This year's numbers measure freshmen who entered the school from the 2002-2003 school year through 2005-2006. The men's basketball team went from 46 percent in 2011 to 50 percent this year, while women's basketball improved from 81 percent to 93 percent. The football team's rate improved from 59 percent to 65 percent.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 11, 2014
Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame Native Dancer, five others to be inducted in November Racehorse Native Dancer, swimmer Beth Botsford , baseball-football players Tommy Brown and Brian Jordan , lacrosse player and coach Bob Scott and figure skater Kimmie Meissner will be inducted into the Maryland State Athletic Hall of Fame on Nov. 13 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie. In addition, the Hall will present the John Steadman Lifetime Achievement Award, which recognizes the contribution of individuals over a long career of supporting and advancing athletics in the state of Maryland, to the late Earl Banks , who was the football coach at Morgan State.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
To those who follow college athletics only casually, the announcement last week that the University of Maryland will henceforth award athletic scholarships on a multi-year basis instead of year-to-year may sound like a minor change. But in fact, it's a major reform that is not only welcome but is likely to attract a legion of imitators. From the effort to unionize athletes at Northwestern University as school employees (a year-long struggle that remains ongoing) to the legal fight over whether the NCAA can profit from the images of athletes in video games and elsewhere without compensating them, how colleges and universities treat athletes — or mistreat them — has sparked a pitched battle of late.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | August 25, 2014
So the big programs of college football have gotten together as the Big 5 conferences. Like political separatists, they are loosening their ties with the National Collegiate Athletic Association, dissociating themselves from their smaller, less showy brethren. Presidents of some of the less powerful football schools are protesting, but if they truly care about the academic missions of their schools, they should welcome the change. Tired of sharing their profits with schools where education is still primary, member schools of the Big 5 conferences (ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Towson released its first depth chart of the preseason Friday, and there were a couple notable surprises. The first entails the free safety position. Junior Christian Carpenter, an Aberdeen native and graduate who was a first-team All-Colonial Athletic Association selection last season, is second on the depth chart. Carpenter, who tied then-sophomore strong safety Donnell Lewis for the team lead in interceptions with four and ranked fourth in tackles with 98, has been leapfrogged by redshirt sophomore Jordan Mynatt.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Broadneck football coach Rob Harris took the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge twice. He's not on Facebook and didn't have proof of the first dousing, so he had ice water poured over his head a second time. That didn't bother him. Harris would take a few more ice water showers if it would raise additional money for research into the neurodegenerative disease at the heart of the challenge, a social media fundraising wave that has swept the country this month. Harris has a personal connection to ALS. His wife Sarah's uncle, Johnny O'Brien, a former Severna Park football player, was 56 when he died in January of the condition widely known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Under Armour is working to land NBA superstar Kevin Durant as a pitch man — a sponsorship deal that could be one of the largest ever signed and give the Baltimore company a major inroad into the lucrative basketball marketplace. Signing the popular Oklahoma City Thunder forward, who grew up playing basketball in Washington and Maryland and still has family in the region, would be a coup for Under Armour as it tries to build its shoe business and boost its stature internationally.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | February 8, 2011
Well, that one struck a nerve. Write a column listing the coolest athletes ever to play in Maryland and you expect to get reaction. Oh, did I get reaction. My in-box blew up. I got phone calls. A guy cornered me at the 7-Eleven and said: "Two words: No Rick Dempsey?" "That's three words," I said. "And how did you get past my security detail?" Then I remembered I didn't have a security detail. But back to the list, which appeared in Thursday's column and was a direct rip-off of GQ magazine's list of 25 all-time coolest athletes.
HEALTH
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Mike Gimbel travels around Baltimore with a cache of energy drinks, everything from Red Bull to Monster to 5-Hour Energy shots. When he talks to teenage athletes, the Towson-based substance abuse expert uses his display to help them understand what they consume when downing an energy drink before practice. Sure, they get the caffeine and the sugar that provide the boost they're looking for, but Gimbel said the athletes — and their parents — would be surprised to discover what else is on the label.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 19, 2014
Two recent major developments may revolutionize major college sports, potentially to the benefit of long-exploited college athletes. It's about time. On August 7 the National Collegiate Athletic Association decreed that the five major conferences - the University of Maryland's former and new conferences, the ACC and the Big Ten; plus the Big 12, PAC-12 and the SEC - shall have greater autonomy to develop policies that specifically meet their needs. Experts believe the five conferences' 65 member universities could, among other changes, begin to pay annual stipends for student-athletes and cover their tuition and other scholastic costs after their eligibility has expired.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Maryland men's soccer coach Sasho Cirovski has seen more than a dozen of his players leave school early to pursue professional careers. The departures have often left Cirovski to wonder whether his former athletes would eventually come back to finish their undergraduate degrees. With a new program announced Tuesday by Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, athletes in all of the school's sports will be able to return with their scholarships intact as long as they left the university in good academic and social standing.
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