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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | July 12, 2011
Playwrights sculpt language. Their linguistic craftsmanship, which will be on ample display this summer during the 30th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival, is certainly present in Marilyn Millstone's "The Sculptress," right now at Fells Point Corner Theatre. Millstone's biographical play concerns Camille Claudel, the French sculptor who served as the muse for her much older lover, the 19th-century sculptor Auguste Rodin. Her career was overshadowed by his, and she never psychologically recovered from the end of their love affair.
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EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
An article in the June 24, 1911 edition of The Argus reported on the safe return of a state mental hospital patient who said he had made his way across town to visit family members. John Leubecker , aged 46 years, an escaped inmate of the Maryland Hospital for the Insane at Catonsville, who terrorized the residents along Gridon avenue, Lauraville, Monday night, was captured shortly before 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the home of his stepdaughter, Mrs. Henry Peper , on the Philadelphia road near Rossville.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
In 10 short words, the United States government has given a Salvadoran family living in Maryland an unexpected gift — the assurance that it will not be torn apart by deportation. " DHS, hereby, moves to withdraw its appeal on this matter," wrote Nelson A. Vargas-Padilla, deputy chief counsel in the Department of Homeland Security's Baltimore office, on Nov. 18. With that terse statement, the government reversed its earlier decision to appeal an immigration judge's ruling that granted asylum to Maria Canales de Maldonado and her son, Pablo, 18. Mother and son fled a gang in El Salvador that killed another son and continued to menace the family.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
Hundreds of youngsters once lived in the castle-like West Baltimore institution known as the Hebrew Orphan Asylum that advocates say is the oldest remaining Jewish orphanage building in the country. Now a coalition of preservationists, community leaders and officials of the Jewish Museum of Maryland have launched an attention-raising campaign to preserve the vacant, boarded-up building. The building, which was acquired by Coppin State University in 2003, lacks a roof and costs about $8,000 a month to keep standing.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2010
After gangsters in El Salvador murdered her teenage son and harassed her family three years ago, Maria Canales de Maldonado fled to the United States, seeking refuge and a measure of peace in Maryland. Now the American government is at the root of new fears. In July an immigration judge in Baltimore granted asylum to Canales de Maldonado and her 18-year-old son, Pablo, after they arrived illegally in the United States seeking sanctuary from the gang that continued to torment their family.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2009
FRIDAY 'GRUNDLEHAMMER': Forget "Tommy" and "Jesus Christ Superstar," "Grundlehammer" is a rock opera for the masses. The Baltimore Rock Opera Society and its seven-piece metal orchestra perform 15 original rock songs in this medieval fantasy at 2640 Space, 2640 St. Paul St. The show is at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 4 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $8-$10. Go to baltimorerockopera.org. SUGARLOAF CRAFT FESTIVAL: More than 250 juried artists display their crafts, including pottery, sculpture, jewelry, fashion and furniture, at Timonium Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
The 12-year-old boy's harrowing story tumbled out: Tormented by a gang in his native El Salvador. Sent by his terrified mother to sneak into the United States in search of safety. Nabbed by Border Patrol agents in Texas. Told he'd have to go back home, whatever the consequences. Santos Maldonado-Canales badly wanted to stay, and now, sitting in a plush Baltimore law firm in August 2008, his hopes rested with an earnest young lawyer. At 27, Azim Chowdhury was two years out of law school and knew nothing about immigration law. A partner at the Duane Morris firm had given him the case as part of its mission to offer free representation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
U.S. immigration authorities have begun deportation proceedings against a Rwandan academic who was suspended by Goucher College amid allegations that he had participated in the African country's 1994 genocide. Leopold Munyakazi, 59, was arrested Tuesday afternoon at his home in Towson. Immigration officials said only that he was "in the country illegally," though he had arrived with a valid visa, said Brandon A. Montgomery, a spokesman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Munyakazi was released on condition he wear a monitoring device and remain at home, Montgomery said, adding that "removal proceedings" have begun.
NEWS
July 11, 2008
Hallucinogens a risky quick fix Before The Sun weighed in on the medicinal value of hallucinogens ("Tuning in, not out," editorial, July 6), it would have been worth its while to engage in some scientific investigative reporting. A publication by Hopkins researchers should not be accepted blindly as the truth. LSD for victims of trauma? This recommendation despite the increased risk of suicide documented among LSD users? Ecstasy for post-traumatic stress? Ecstasy may provide short-term relief, but it can cause long-term defects in the brain's systems for transporting and receiving serotonin, the very systems most important for stable mood.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | July 8, 2008
WASHINGTON - Growing up in the West African nation of Mali, Alima Traore assumed that girls everywhere had to undergo the procedure. "In my country, it is usually an old lady" who performs the crude surgery, the 29-year-old woman said during an interview in her attorney's Rockville office. "They have a traditional knife for it. They cut your intimate parts. This knife is used for many girls." It wasn't until Traore came to the United States eight years ago that she learned that female genital mutilation has been condemned the world over as a human rights abuse.
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