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NEWS
May 16, 2005
THE U.S. SENATE'S 100-to-0 vote last week in support of an $82 billion emergency defense spending bill turns out to have been an unfortunate endorsement of restricting the rights of asylum seekers. A measure attached to the bill that is being touted as an antiterrorism provision is nothing short of an assault on long-held legal protections in this country for people who fled violent and life-threatening religious, political and ethnic persecution elsewhere. The new restrictions on asylum seekers, already approved by the House of Representatives, are all but certain now that President Bush -- the same President Bush who has been traveling the world and vigorously calling for human rights protections for oppressed people under the thumb of nondemocratic regimes -- has said he will sign the bill into law. This will cap a long effort by misguided congressional lawmakers to convert asylum laws into asylum barriers.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 11, 2014
The University System of Maryland Board of Regents voted Thursday to sell the vacant and deteriorated former Hebrew Orphan Asylum in West Baltimore to the Coppin Heights Community Development Corp. for redevelopment as a community health center, according to a university spokesman. The land is currently owned by Coppin State University, which acquired it as part of a 7.3-acre, $680,000 purchase from the Lutheran Home and Hospital Foundation Inc. in 2003. The chancellor recommended that the board allow Coppin State University to move forward with sale of the property.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | October 17, 2012
“Patients committed here suffer not only diseases of the mind, but also of the body.” - Dr. Arthur Arden. Welcome to 1964, where Jessica Lange is no longer Constance Langdon, but Sister Jude, a badass nun with a Boston accent running the Briarcliff Manor insane asylum. Also returning is Evan Peters, no longer an angst-ridden teen ghost but an alien abductee named Kit Walker, who is detained for the murder of his wife and called “Bloody Face.” (It's a huge role reversal for Peters, who was probably tired of constantly lubing up to fit into the “Rubber Man” costume)
NEWS
May 23, 2014
The United States grants asylum protection to immigrants of special humanitarian concern who were persecuted in their home countries because of their membership in a particular group and who aren't barred from eligibility because of some past crime or potential danger. We typically think of asylum recipients as being refugees forced to flee religious, ethnic or political torment. But what about former gang members? A 33-year-old Baltimore County man who entered the country illegally from El Salvador in 2000 is seeking asylum as a defense against deportation.
EXPLORE
June 22, 2011
An article in the June 24, 1911 edition of The Argus reported on the safe return of a state mental hospital patient who said he had made his way across town to visit family members. John Leubecker , aged 46 years, an escaped inmate of the Maryland Hospital for the Insane at Catonsville, who terrorized the residents along Gridon avenue, Lauraville, Monday night, was captured shortly before 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the home of his stepdaughter, Mrs. Henry Peper , on the Philadelphia road near Rossville.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Major elements of the Clinton administration's long-awaited plan for speeding up the review of political asylum claims, released yesterday, came under immediate attack from some immigration advocates.Among the most contentious issues are proposals designed to discourage "frivolous" claims for asylum: charging a $130 fee per applicant, requiring a wait of at least 150 days to obtain a work authorization, and granting greater discretion to asylum hearing officers to decide whether to interview an applicant face-to-face.
NEWS
February 24, 1994
College students who have had to pay fees to apply for financial aid will understand. The Immigration and Naturalization Service wants to charge $130 for anyone applying for political asylum. This should reduce demand volume. It should insure a more conservative, respectable type of political refugee.No doubt fearing ridicule, Attorney General Janet Reno immediately backtracked on the INS proposal to this extent: It would waive the fee for anyone who can't pay. What, then, is it for?A much more meaningful INS proposal would deny a work permit for six months to political asylum applicants, instead of giving it immediately to anyone who has been instructed on how to apply.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1992
MUNICH, Germany -- For the worried Munich city welfare official, it was one more piece of bad news.The rise in the number of foreigners seeking political asylum in Germany had reached a point where the already overcrowded Bavarian capital would have to house new arrivals at a rate of 250 a week instead of the previous 150."Where are they going to go?" asked the official, Hans Stuetzle, director of the social affairs department of the Munich city government.For some, the answer was already clear: They were going to one of 43 transport containers sitting in a corner of the city's famous Oktoberfest grounds.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 30, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Human rights lawyers will fly to the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, today to seek evidence that more than 5,000 Haitian boat people picked up on the high seas by U.S. Coast Guard cutters in recent weeks face unfair consideration of their asylum requests.The lawyers will argue in a Miami court Monday that the way the boat people are being screened by U.S. immigration officials prevents proper judgment on whether they are refugees with an internationally recognized right to haven outside their own country.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
When Julio Martinez crossed the U.S. border illegally more than a decade ago, his attorneys say, he was running for his life, attempting to escape the deadly and pervasive gang he joined in his native El Salvador as a 14-year-old boy. Martinez, who entered the country in 2000 and lived in Middle River for years, is now at the center of a legal question that has split federal courts and that could have significant implications for U.S. immigration...
NEWS
June 18, 2013
It was a stormy winter night in Annapolis when the dictatorial triumvirate of O'Malley, Miller, and Busch were thinking about another new tax they could impose on the serfs in their kingdom known as “Merryland.” As the rain pounded on the roof, a light bulb went on over the heads of the enlightened three. Why not tax the rainfall? After all, that way they could blame God who caused the rain to fall. Empowered, they sent the proposal over to the general asylum of Maryland where their favored Democrats in the Baltimore City, Prince George's and Montgomery counties could authorize the proposal into law by edit.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 1, 2013
Nearly three years ago, I stood with neighborhood residents and preservationists before what looked like an abandoned and very sad West Baltimore brick castle. Below its remarkable towers and stout walls on Rayner Avenue, I thought that this venerable old orphanage would not make it another year. Clearly at the end of its days, it seemed ready to fall from its embankment and hit the street. It was vacant, lacking a good roof and was lightly boarded. It is owned by Coppin State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | January 24, 2013
After a season of blood-curdling thrills set in the 1960s, we've come full circle to modern times. Now we can all sleep easy for a few months. Unlike the Season 1 finale where viewers were left on a cliffhanger, the show's writers tied this season up with a nice little bow (and no, killer Santa Lee Emerson won't be delivering this present). There is one person in the giving spirit however, and it's not Lana Winters (unless you count death as a gift). By the time the self-obsessed journalist arrives at Briarcliff to film her expose, Sister Jude has already been released from the asylum under the care of Kit. It takes time for Jude to detox and not chase Kit's children around the house with a broom while making threats, but eventually Jude regains her sanity and teaches the kids various dances and how to sew. I never took Jude for the Mary Poppins type, but she finds happiness caring for the children in the Walker household.
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