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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
The course is Human Space Flight. The subject for today: analogues - the scenarios found in the world or contrived in the laboratory that NASA uses to simulate work and life aboard a space ship. Naval Academy professor Ken Reightler leads the class of 13 midshipmen through a discussion that traverses Ernest Shackleton's 1914 expedition of the Antarctic, deep-sea exploration and the experiments at Biosphere 2 - and how lessons from each will help astronauts prepare for the first manned mission to Mars.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
Cockeysville native and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman shared a bird's-eye view of downtown Baltimore with his Twitter followers Monday, the latest in a string of interesting perspectives he has shared. " Nice to fly over my hometown # Baltimore . Camden yards clearly visible. Go @ Orioles ," he said via his Twitter handle, @Astro_Reid , with a picture he took from aboard the International Space Station. The tweet came just days after another space station flyover of Baltimore during which Wiseman took a photo of severe thunderstorms moving through the region.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | August 21, 2005
SPACE MOONDUST: IN SEARCH OF THE MEN WHO FELL TO EARTH By Andrew Smith. 4th Estate. 372 pages. So Discovery finally clawed its way into space, only to find its lethal problem with falling debris still unresolved. Astronauts had to pluck loose stuffing from the shuttle's belly before they could come home. And, on landing, their dwindling fleet of 20-year-old spaceships was grounded. Again. Americans old enough to remember the heady, heroic days of Armstrong and Aldrin, Apollo and the Sea of Tranquillity, must wonder where the nation's glorious manned space program jumped the tracks.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
Thanks to his unabashed enthusiasm for the job and his way with a tweet, Cockeysville's Reid Wiseman is becoming quite the Twitterverse celebrity as he orbits the Earth on the International Space Station. Almost from the moment he arrived at the station May 29, Wiseman, 38, has been posting photographs and commentary to his Twitter feed (his handle is @astro_reid). Even before his Soyuz flight took off May 28, Wiseman was posting selfies, including some featuring his crew mates German astronaut Alexander Gerst and Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 2006
Discovery astronauts completed the first major task of their mission yesterday, installing a 2-ton truss on the International Space Station's main backbone during a six-hour spacewalk. While veteran Robert Curbeam and rookie spacewalker Christer Fuglesang of Sweden directed the maneuver with hand signals, mission specialists Sunita Williams and Joan Higginbotham used the station's robotic arm to delicately maneuver the $11 million truss into position. The truss passed within 2 inches of one of the station's solar arrays - much closer than NASA would prefer - but the installation was completed without incident.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | July 28, 2007
NASA officials vowed yesterday to investigate reports that astronauts were drunk before missions on at least two occasions, but several former astronauts questioned the claims, saying that they were too closely monitored to risk breaking the rules on drinking before a flight. "I didn't see any use of alcohol that infringed safety," said Tom Jones, who served on four shuttle missions before retiring in 2001. "I didn't see any flight surgeons who would have hesitated to blow the whistle."
NEWS
By Homer Hickam | February 11, 2007
As a former NASA astronaut training manager responsible for crew training for shuttle missions, I was not entirely surprised by the initial reports of the sad, bizarre case of Lisa M. Nowak, who is charged with assault, attempted kidnapping and attempted murder. This isn't the first case of astronauts having difficulties in their personal lives. Usually, the straying astronaut simply resigns or retires, and everything is hushed up. Perhaps this case will bring some of NASA's long-ignored problems into the open.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Astronauts at the Johnson Space Center in Houston have flown two-seater supersonic jets to Colorado Springs on weekends during ski season as well as to New Orleans and Fort Lauderdale, Fla., according to NASA's inspector general.While the astronauts said they were fulfilling the flight time required of them each month, some lawmakers criticized the flights to resort cities, which cost about $2,000 an hour.Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, the Connecticut Democrat who is chairman of the Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Government Regulation and Information, said the audit, which was prepared by the inspector general and made public in February, raises questions about the purpose of the trips.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2001
The makers of Gordon's Chesapeake Classics foods knew they had a good Maryland Red Crab Soup, but it wasn't until last week that they knew it was out of this world. That was when the owners of the Pocomoke City food processor found out that their soup was among the provisions carried by the astronauts on the space shuttle Atlantis as it rocketed to the international space station. National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials say astronaut Tom Jones, one of three Baltimore natives on the mission, brought the soup to the Johnson Space Center in Houston and asked that it be freeze-dried and included in the food rations.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 21, 1993
CHICAGO -- Frank Borman, James Lovell Jr. and William Anders stood on a ramp overlooking the Apollo 8 command module on display at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.A news reporter conducted an interview as visitors to the museum's Henry Crown Space Center gazed up at them and murmured in awe.Mr. Anders broke away and walked down the ramp, then back up, then down again, staring intently at the spacecraft. After 25 years, he was still intrigued with the 9-by-13-foot capsule whose white-and-rust mottled exterior bore silent testimony to the demanding role it had played in the history of humanity, and also in the lives of three men.On Dec. 21, 1968, Messrs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
The course is Human Space Flight. The subject for today: analogues - the scenarios found in the world or contrived in the laboratory that NASA uses to simulate work and life aboard a space ship. Naval Academy professor Ken Reightler leads the class of 13 midshipmen through a discussion that traverses Ernest Shackleton's 1914 expedition of the Antarctic, deep-sea exploration and the experiments at Biosphere 2 - and how lessons from each will help astronauts prepare for the first manned mission to Mars.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 8, 2013
It promises to be an out of this world experience when a former astronaut visits Harford Day School on Tuesday, March 12 to talk about the latest things humankind has learned about the next world over, Mars. Donald A. Thomas, who spent 19 years as a NASA astronaut logging 1,040 hours in space, is scheduled to speak from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Harford Day, 715 Moores Mill Road in Bel Air. Thomas will talk about what has been learned thanks to Curiosity, the Mars rover that landed Aug. 6, 2012 and has been exploring the surface of the red planet ever since.
NEWS
By Jim O'Leary | August 30, 2012
They say a picture is worth a thousand words. If so, I have one for you. It came to mind last week when I heard of the death of Neil Armstrong, famed for being the first to set foot upon the Moon. His boyish face appeared on many photos through the years, as a Korean fighter pilot, civilian test pilot and eventually as one of the second group of astronauts selected by NASA. After John Kennedy's challenge to land on the moon before decade's end, one of the men in this second group that called themselves the "Next Nine" or the "Nifty Nine" - in contrast to the "Original Seven" astronauts - was destined to be the first to touch the lunar surface.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
I was saddened to learn of astronaut Sally Ride's death ("Ride had the cool to break barriers," July 25). Outer space is infinite, but human life is not. Sixty-one seems too young for this pioneer to leave us. I feel fortunate, blessed and privileged to have lived at a time when men and women traveled into space and explored the moon. However, what I deeply regret is the manner all the astronauts appeared to "hide their light under a bushel. " At a time when we desperately need genuine heroes, role models, adventurers and explorers who take chances in real time, their reluctance to put themselves in the public eye was regrettable.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 12, 2012
There's a great scene in the movie "The Right Stuff" where the original Mercury astronauts are checking out the capsule for their first trips to space. They're horrified to discover that the German scientists in charge of the program see the astronauts as nothing more than living props. There is no window, the scientists explain. There's no emergency hatch or even controls for the astronauts to use. It's all automated. "We want a window," the astronauts demand. The white-frocked experts reluctantly agree to give the astronauts a window and piloting controls because they know the American people would hate to see the nation's greatest pilots treated like lab monkeys with no say in their fate.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | February 22, 2010
When he applied for the No. 2 job at the Space Telescope Science Institute, John Grunsfeld hit on a way to stand out from other candidates. First, he loaded a cover letter and a resume onto a memory stick. Then he took it with him into space. The astrophysicist, then on his third mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, waited until the space shuttle's robot arm had grabbed the orbiting observatory before he fired off his note. "He actually used the words, 'I am holding Hubble hostage until you read my application,' " the institute's director, Matt Mountain, recalled.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1992
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The space shuttle Endeavour glided to Earth yesterday afternoon, ending a nine-day inaugural voyage that featured a daring rescue of a wayward communications satellite."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1990
Astrophysicist Samuel T. Durrance thought he would be excited and nervous when the space shuttle Columbia blasted off Dec. 2, but when the actual time came after many rehearsals and false starts the thrill wasn't quite there."
NEWS
By Paul West and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 1, 2010
President Barack Obama wants to end the nation's troubled program to return astronauts to the moon, but NASA officials indicated Monday that any change was unlikely to mean cutbacks at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Obama's $3.8 trillion budget for fiscal 2011, which forecasts a record deficit, includes provisions for increased spending designed to improve the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a 1.4 percent annual pay increase for federal workers and an array of tax and education initiatives that would affect Maryland and the rest of the country, if Congress approves them.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
John M. Grunsfeld, a former NASA astronaut who logged more than 58 hours on spacewalks during three missions to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, has been named deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. Grunsfeld, who holds a doctorate in physics and specializes in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and high-energy cosmic ray studies. In a statement, he called his new job "an incredibly exciting opportunity for me to work at a focal point of top astronomers at the leading edge of scientific inquiry."
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