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NEWS
By John W. Frece and Frank D. Roylance and John W. Frece and Frank D. Roylance,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 23, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Long before colonial lawmakers quaffed their first ale at local taverns, and long before the first lobbyists were sighted along the banks of the Severn, Astrodon johnstoni foraged through the land that would become Maryland.And now, 130 million years later (give or take), a state legislator wants to declare Astrodon the official, not-to-be-confused-with-others, state dinosaur."If they were our precursors here in Maryland, then we ought to have them as our dinosaur," said Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's, sponsor of the Astrodon bill.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Scientists working in Laurel's Dinosaur Park on Wednesday excavated the largest dinosaur fossil found in Maryland in five years. It's too early to say for sure what type of bone it was. "It's not a femur; maybe part of a femur head," said Smithsonian fossil preparator Steve Jabo, 50, who did most of the digging to free the fossil bone from the site's dense clay. The importance of the discovery won't be known until after the fossil is cleaned and studied at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, Jabo said.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The state dinosaur came close to extinction in the Senate yesterday.But, luckily for the Astrodon johnstoni, it has a tough hide and survived a move to table a bill to give the herbivore official state status.Astrodon's fossil remains are peculiar to Maryland, and peculiar was one of the more polite terms critics used to describe the Astrodon bill, sponsored by Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's.Sen. James C. Simpson, D-Charles, said passing legislation on frivolous matters during difficult economic times could mean "we're all going to be dinosaurs come 1994," the next election year for the General Assembly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Cool. That's what four kids at Federal Hill Preparatory School said when they learned they could leave school for a few hours last week for a sneak preview of the newly expanded Maryland Science Center. It would not be their last "cool" of the day. Fourth-graders Sydney Spann and Matt Ekey, both 9, and third-graders David Clark, 9, and Dominique Willis, 8, are what you might call budding science geeks. What better focus group, we thought, for a shakedown tour of the newly renovated (but still unfinished)
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 25, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The state dinosaur lives.A Senate committee yesterday voted to approve a bill recognizing Astrodon johnstoni as Maryland's state dinosaur. Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's, sponsored the bill because Astrodon is peculiar to Maryland. The bill now goes to the full Senate for consideration.Remains of the beast, which roamed Maryland 130 million years ago, have been found in sand and gravel pits along the U.S. 1 corridor near Beltsville, Muirkirk and Bladensburg.Not everyone has been supportive of Mr. Dorman's desire to see the Astrodon anointed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
An amateur geologist poking around on a desolate, rubble-strewn lot in Arbutus has stumbled across what appears to be part of a leg bone of Maryland's official state dinosaur, Astrodon johnstoni.Rick Smith, 44, found the bone last Sunday after just four trips to the property. He could hardly believe his beginner's luck."The idea of finding a dinosaur bone less than two miles from my house is pretty mind-boggling," he said.The find was identified on Tuesday by Washington geologist Peter Kranz.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1998
They didn't wear pressed suits. They didn't carry leather briefcases. They didn't make a single urgent call on a cellular phone.These were no ordinary lobbyists.But that turned out to be a distinct advantage for a Maryland paleontologist and seven schoolchildren who came to Annapolis yesterday looking for senators to back a renewed effort to make Astrodon johnstoni the official state dinosaur.Senators practiced at polite brushoffs readily opened their doors. One senator stopped on his way out. Several others invited the dinosaur fans to sit down and tell them about the Astrodon, a long-necked sauropod that lived in Maryland 110 million years ago.Within an hour, the students from Flintstone Elementary School in Oxon Hill, in Prince George's County, had cajoled Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden into sponsoring a bill and had picked up a few co-sponsors.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
EMMITSBURG - Peter Kranz, Maryland's dinosaur evangelist, teeters precariously on the weed-choked slope of an old mudstone quarry near the Pennsylvania line.His feet slipping on the tilted bedrock and fallen leaves, the Washington-based geologist is trying to explain to quarry owner and town councilman Patrick Boyle how Emmitsburg could turn the rocks in this forlorn place into a wellspring of tourist dollars."If you peel this back," he says, waving toward the brush and dirt clinging to the quarry's layered rock slabs, "there's absolutely going to be footprints on them."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Scientists working in Laurel's Dinosaur Park on Wednesday excavated the largest dinosaur fossil found in Maryland in five years. It's too early to say for sure what type of bone it was. "It's not a femur; maybe part of a femur head," said Smithsonian fossil preparator Steve Jabo, 50, who did most of the digging to free the fossil bone from the site's dense clay. The importance of the discovery won't be known until after the fossil is cleaned and studied at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, Jabo said.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
With trowels, toothbrushes, shovels and hammers in hand, about 20 people descended yesterday on a dusty lot off U.S. 1 near Interstate 95 and the Baltimore Beltway to spend a beautiful fall morning digging in the dirt amid abandoned tires and broken concrete. The search for the Arbutusaurus was on. "It's just a matter of being in the right place at the right time," Peter M. Kranz told the group of adult students, who are taking a course on dinosaurs. "That's why we have all of you out here.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
With trowels, toothbrushes, shovels and hammers in hand, about 20 people descended yesterday on a dusty lot off U.S. 1 near Interstate 95 and the Baltimore Beltway to spend a beautiful fall morning digging in the dirt amid abandoned tires and broken concrete. The search for the Arbutusaurus was on. "It's just a matter of being in the right place at the right time," Peter M. Kranz told the group of adult students, who are taking a course on dinosaurs. "That's why we have all of you out here.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
An amateur geologist poking around on a desolate, rubble-strewn lot in Arbutus has stumbled across what appears to be part of a leg bone of Maryland's official state dinosaur, Astrodon johnstoni.Rick Smith, 44, found the bone last Sunday after just four trips to the property. He could hardly believe his beginner's luck."The idea of finding a dinosaur bone less than two miles from my house is pretty mind-boggling," he said.The find was identified on Tuesday by Washington geologist Peter Kranz.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
EMMITSBURG - Peter Kranz, Maryland's dinosaur evangelist, teeters precariously on the weed-choked slope of an old mudstone quarry near the Pennsylvania line.His feet slipping on the tilted bedrock and fallen leaves, the Washington-based geologist is trying to explain to quarry owner and town councilman Patrick Boyle how Emmitsburg could turn the rocks in this forlorn place into a wellspring of tourist dollars."If you peel this back," he says, waving toward the brush and dirt clinging to the quarry's layered rock slabs, "there's absolutely going to be footprints on them."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1998
Move over, Chesapeake Bay retriever. Maryland is about to get another official state creature: the Astrodon johnstoni dinosaur.Astrodon, a long-necked, long-tailed sauropod that lived in Maryland between 130 million and 95 million years ago, is poised to become the state dinosaur under legislation headed toward General Assembly passage.The dinosaur would be the 16th state symbol, joining the retriever (state dog), Baltimore oriole (state bird) and black-eyed Susan (state flower).The House approved the dinosaur designation 117-12 yesterday.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1998
They didn't wear pressed suits. They didn't carry leather briefcases. They didn't make a single urgent call on a cellular phone.These were no ordinary lobbyists.But that turned out to be a distinct advantage for a Maryland paleontologist and seven schoolchildren who came to Annapolis yesterday looking for senators to back a renewed effort to make Astrodon johnstoni the official state dinosaur.Senators practiced at polite brushoffs readily opened their doors. One senator stopped on his way out. Several others invited the dinosaur fans to sit down and tell them about the Astrodon, a long-necked sauropod that lived in Maryland 110 million years ago.Within an hour, the students from Flintstone Elementary School in Oxon Hill, in Prince George's County, had cajoled Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden into sponsoring a bill and had picked up a few co-sponsors.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The state dinosaur came close to extinction in the Senate yesterday.But, luckily for the Astrodon johnstoni, it has a tough hide and survived a move to table a bill to give the herbivore official state status.Astrodon's fossil remains are peculiar to Maryland, and peculiar was one of the more polite terms critics used to describe the Astrodon bill, sponsored by Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's.Sen. James C. Simpson, D-Charles, said passing legislation on frivolous matters during difficult economic times could mean "we're all going to be dinosaurs come 1994," the next election year for the General Assembly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Cool. That's what four kids at Federal Hill Preparatory School said when they learned they could leave school for a few hours last week for a sneak preview of the newly expanded Maryland Science Center. It would not be their last "cool" of the day. Fourth-graders Sydney Spann and Matt Ekey, both 9, and third-graders David Clark, 9, and Dominique Willis, 8, are what you might call budding science geeks. What better focus group, we thought, for a shakedown tour of the newly renovated (but still unfinished)
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1998
Move over, Chesapeake Bay retriever. Maryland is about to get another official state creature: the Astrodon johnstoni dinosaur.Astrodon, a long-necked, long-tailed sauropod that lived in Maryland between 130 million and 95 million years ago, is poised to become the state dinosaur under legislation headed toward General Assembly passage.The dinosaur would be the 16th state symbol, joining the retriever (state dog), Baltimore oriole (state bird) and black-eyed Susan (state flower).The House approved the dinosaur designation 117-12 yesterday.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 25, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The state dinosaur lives.A Senate committee yesterday voted to approve a bill recognizing Astrodon johnstoni as Maryland's state dinosaur. Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's, sponsored the bill because Astrodon is peculiar to Maryland. The bill now goes to the full Senate for consideration.Remains of the beast, which roamed Maryland 130 million years ago, have been found in sand and gravel pits along the U.S. 1 corridor near Beltsville, Muirkirk and Bladensburg.Not everyone has been supportive of Mr. Dorman's desire to see the Astrodon anointed.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Frank D. Roylance and John W. Frece and Frank D. Roylance,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 23, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Long before colonial lawmakers quaffed their first ale at local taverns, and long before the first lobbyists were sighted along the banks of the Severn, Astrodon johnstoni foraged through the land that would become Maryland.And now, 130 million years later (give or take), a state legislator wants to declare Astrodon the official, not-to-be-confused-with-others, state dinosaur."If they were our precursors here in Maryland, then we ought to have them as our dinosaur," said Sen. Arthur Dorman, D-Prince George's, sponsor of the Astrodon bill.
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