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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Research labs closed by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer dot the country: Illinois. Michigan. New Jersey. New York. North Carolina. Maryland officials don't want this state to join that list. After Pfizer declared its desire to buy AstraZeneca — which employs 3,100 in the state — Gov. Martin O'Malley and six members of Maryland's congressional delegation fired off concerned letters, even though the purchase is by no means a done deal. So far, London-based AstraZeneca has rebuffed its New York suitor.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
Research labs closed by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer dot the country: Illinois. Michigan. New Jersey. New York. North Carolina. Maryland officials don't want this state to join that list. After Pfizer declared its desire to buy AstraZeneca — which employs 3,100 in the state — Gov. Martin O'Malley and six members of Maryland's congressional delegation fired off concerned letters, even though the purchase is by no means a done deal. So far, London-based AstraZeneca has rebuffed its New York suitor.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
When Gail Folena-Wasserman joined Gaithersburg biotechnology startup MedImmune in 1991, she was its first employee in research and development, and dreamed of what the company might be "when it grew up. " Two decades later, the senior vice president for biopharmaceutical development is helping to test new drugs at a dramatically different MedImmune. Five years since a $15 billion acquisition by British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, the company is funneling a pipeline of potential therapies that has grown three times over and covers a wider spectrum of diseases.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and Delaware Gov. Jack Markell sent a joint letter to Pfizer Thursday expressing concerns about its proposed $106 billion acquisition of pharmaceutical firm AstraZeneca, which employs thousands in both states. The governors said they earlier asked for but did not receive assurances from Pfizer that it intends to preserve those jobs, though they said the company made such promises to British leaders about jobs there. "Our concern is exacerbated by Pfizer's history of closing U.S. research facilities, including sites in Michigan and Illinois, after closing on previous corporate transactions," they wrote.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
After 16 years of guiding MedImmune Inc. from a struggling Gaithersburg biotech to one of the world's most profitable, Chief Executive David M. Mott is stepping down for personal reasons, the company's London-based parent, AstraZeneca PLC, said yesterday. Tony Zook, CEO of AstraZeneca's North American business based in Wilmington, Del., will succeed Mott when he leaves at the end of July. The announcement surprised local biotech representatives, who look to Mott, 42, as a role model in an industry the state considers among its best hopes for economic growth.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Biotechnology company MedImmune said Tuesday it has expanded a bioresearch collaboration it started with the University of System of Maryland. The Gaithersburg company, a development arm of AstraZeneca, started the partnership with the University of Maryland Baltimore in 2013 and will now also work with campuses in College Park and Baltimore County. Research will start on five projects under the expanded agreement. MedImmune will contribute at least $5 million to the partnership over a five-year period, and the University System of Maryland institutions will contribute $800,000.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
A Chicago-area whistleblower's disclosure about illegal competition between two drugmakers culminated yesterday in a guilty plea by a British pharmaceutical giant, closing a chapter on a $1.2 billion health-care fraud scheme, the largest in U.S. history. London-based AstraZeneca PLC signed an agreement with the Justice Department to pay a $355 million penalty and plead guilty to a criminal charge of conspiring with doctors to bill government insurers for free samples of its prostate cancer drug, Zoladex.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,sun reporter | April 24, 2007
AstraZeneca PLC, formed from two companies in 1999, has grown into one of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies with 66,000 employees and $26.5 billion in sales last year. Based in London, it has a stable of top-selling drugs, including Crestor to reduce cholesterol, Nexium for acid reflux disease and Seroquel for treating schizophrenia. But not everything is going the company's way these days. Faced with increased competition from generic drugs, it said in February that it would lay off 3,000 workers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and Delaware Gov. Jack Markell sent a joint letter to Pfizer Thursday expressing concerns about its proposed $106 billion acquisition of pharmaceutical firm AstraZeneca, which employs thousands in both states. The governors said they earlier asked for but did not receive assurances from Pfizer that it intends to preserve those jobs, though they said the company made such promises to British leaders about jobs there. "Our concern is exacerbated by Pfizer's history of closing U.S. research facilities, including sites in Michigan and Illinois, after closing on previous corporate transactions," they wrote.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | December 8, 2007
MedImmune has been able to double the number of potential products in development to 100 since the Maryland biotech was acquired last spring by drug giant AstraZeneca, David M. Mott, MedImmune's president and chief executive officer, said yesterday. Since AstraZeneca agreed to pay $15.6 billion for MedImmune in April, the Gaithersburg biotech has been put in charge of the British firm's biologics units -- Cambridge Antibody Technology in England and a research facility in Hayward, Calif.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Biotechnology company MedImmune said Tuesday it has expanded a bioresearch collaboration it started with the University of System of Maryland. The Gaithersburg company, a development arm of AstraZeneca, started the partnership with the University of Maryland Baltimore in 2013 and will now also work with campuses in College Park and Baltimore County. Research will start on five projects under the expanded agreement. MedImmune will contribute at least $5 million to the partnership over a five-year period, and the University System of Maryland institutions will contribute $800,000.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
When Gail Folena-Wasserman joined Gaithersburg biotechnology startup MedImmune in 1991, she was its first employee in research and development, and dreamed of what the company might be "when it grew up. " Two decades later, the senior vice president for biopharmaceutical development is helping to test new drugs at a dramatically different MedImmune. Five years since a $15 billion acquisition by British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, the company is funneling a pipeline of potential therapies that has grown three times over and covers a wider spectrum of diseases.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | June 27, 2008
After 16 years of guiding MedImmune Inc. from a struggling Gaithersburg biotech to one of the world's most profitable, Chief Executive David M. Mott is stepping down for personal reasons, the company's London-based parent, AstraZeneca PLC, said yesterday. Tony Zook, CEO of AstraZeneca's North American business based in Wilmington, Del., will succeed Mott when he leaves at the end of July. The announcement surprised local biotech representatives, who look to Mott, 42, as a role model in an industry the state considers among its best hopes for economic growth.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,sun reporter | April 24, 2007
AstraZeneca PLC, formed from two companies in 1999, has grown into one of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies with 66,000 employees and $26.5 billion in sales last year. Based in London, it has a stable of top-selling drugs, including Crestor to reduce cholesterol, Nexium for acid reflux disease and Seroquel for treating schizophrenia. But not everything is going the company's way these days. Faced with increased competition from generic drugs, it said in February that it would lay off 3,000 workers.
BUSINESS
By Bruce Japsen and Bruce Japsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
A Chicago-area whistleblower's disclosure about illegal competition between two drugmakers culminated yesterday in a guilty plea by a British pharmaceutical giant, closing a chapter on a $1.2 billion health-care fraud scheme, the largest in U.S. history. London-based AstraZeneca PLC signed an agreement with the Justice Department to pay a $355 million penalty and plead guilty to a criminal charge of conspiring with doctors to bill government insurers for free samples of its prostate cancer drug, Zoladex.
BUSINESS
By Hay Hancock and Hay Hancock,Sun Columnist | April 24, 2007
How desperate is big pharma for new medicines? More than I or anybody else dreamed, as demonstrated by AstraZeneca yesterday. To try to refill its hollow pipeline of future products, AstraZeneca is paying $15.6 billion for MedImmune, the Gaithersburg-based biotech company. It's the biggest corporate buyout in Maryland history - for a company with essentially no earnings. The deal is a landmark not just for big pharma, which has traditionally opted for joint ventures with biotech companies rather than buyouts.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | April 24, 2007
London's AstraZeneca PLC said yesterday that it will pay $15.6 billion in cash to acquire FluMist developer MedImmune Inc. in a deal that highlights how far the pharmaceutical industry is willing to go to shore up its future by tapping into biotechnology. The $58-per-share price tag is the highest paid for a Maryland-based company. And it's significantly more than most investors had predicted when MedImmune, whose headquarters is in Gaithersburg, announced this month that it was considering a sale.
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