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NEWS
February 27, 2014
Regarding your editorial on the health risks of pesticide use, asthma was once thought to be caused by pesticides, but the link was later disproved ( "Understanding pesticide risks," Feb. 20). According to recent studies by the National Institutes of Health, asthma is caused by allergens and genetics. The list of allergens includes cockroaches, rodents, dust mites, dogs, cats, molds and fungi -- but not pesticides. Len Pagley, Glenn Burnie - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A Baltimore-based organization dedicated to improving children's health by bettering their homes received a $1 million grant Wednesday to launch projects across the country to benefit low-income children suffering from asthma. The Green & Healthy Homes Initiative will work with the Calvert Foundation on this effort that got the $1 million boost from the Social Innovation Fund, run by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The grant pays to launch a project that will eventually include work on homes in five regions of the country that have not yet been chosen, but which have a high incidence of children hospitalized for treatment of asthma.
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NEWS
April 18, 2012
Mr. Robert Monroe, Schuykill, afflicted with the above distressing malady.  Symptoms-- Great languor, flatulency, disturbed rest, nervous, head ache, difficulty of breathing, tightness and stricture across the breast, dizziness, nervous irritability and restlessness, could not lie in a horizontal position without the sensation of impending suffocation, palpitation of the heart, distressing cough, costiveness, pain in the stomach, drowsiness and...
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Coal-fired power plants are the greatest source of greenhouse gas in America ( "Carbon rules can work," June 2). Neighboring West Virginia extracts 90 percent of its power from coal alone, and there are eight active coal units in Maryland that violate the EPA's requirements for the filtering of sulfur dioxide, smog-inducing nitrogen oxide and other toxic emissions. Maryland is in soot soup! Not surprisingly, there are 34 deaths per million asthma cases in Baltimore. Twenty-eight percent of city high school students claim diagnosis (national average was 20 percent in 2007)
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A Baltimore-based organization dedicated to improving children's health by bettering their homes received a $1 million grant Wednesday to launch projects across the country to benefit low-income children suffering from asthma. The Green & Healthy Homes Initiative will work with the Calvert Foundation on this effort that got the $1 million boost from the Social Innovation Fund, run by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The grant pays to launch a project that will eventually include work on homes in five regions of the country that have not yet been chosen, but which have a high incidence of children hospitalized for treatment of asthma.
NEWS
March 14, 1995
In East Baltimore, 200 children are enrolled in the Oliver Community School-Based Asthma Program, a pilot project that educates children, parents and teachers -- and even sends health workers into homes to fight conditions that worsen asthma.Of those children, one-quarter used to go to the emergency room at least once during a six-month period. That has been cut to 5 percent over six months, said the asthma project's director, Dr. Peyton Eggleston of Johns Hopkins University Hospital.Article on Page 1E
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | July 19, 2007
Asthma is the most common chronic disorder among American children. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the respiratory disease affects 6.2 million children under age 18. And while many of the stimuli that can trigger an asthma attack -- including sudden temperature change, pollen and respiratory infections -- cannot be avoided, some can. In fact, parents can go far in preventing asthma attacks in their children with hearty doses...
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Reporter | July 5, 2007
Nearly 20 million people (about 9 million of them children) in the United States suffer from asthma, according to the National Institutes of Health. An asthma attack or episode can include symptoms such as wheezing, coughing and difficulty breathing. And summer, with its heat and high humidity, can be a particularly difficult season for those who have the chronic disease, says Dr. John Bacon, an allergy, asthma and immunology specialist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Why are the summer months difficult for asthma sufferers?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 21, 1999
The Lifetime Achievement Gala of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America did double duty -- it honored the co-founder and board chair of the Maryland-Greater Washington chapter, and raised some $21,000 for a Breathmobile, an asthma clinic on wheels.Some 130 people gathered at the Center Club to honor Dr. Philip Norman, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the organization. Well-wishers included his wife, Marion, their two daughters, son and five grandchildren.Also in the congratulatory crowd: foundation executive director Mary-anne Ellis; event honorary co-chairs Dr. Lawrence M. Lichtenstein and Dr. Peter S. Creticos; event committee members Heather Lamont and Michele Jackson; board VP Dr. LeLeng To; board members Mona Tsouklexis and Linda Borschuk; Pat Pullen, Merck & Co. health-science associate; Dr. Mark Liu, pulmonary and allergy specialist at the Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Center; Dr. Jay Perman, pediatrics chair at the University of Maryland School of Medicine; and Zoe Togias, legal counsel with the World Bank.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | February 12, 1991
When an expert panel recommended last week that asthma should be treated as an inflammatory disease, local specialists were not surprised."At least among the research people, that story has been around for a number of years," said Dr. Philip Norman, professor and head of clinical immunology at the Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Center.Asthma causes breathing problems for about 10 million Americans, most of them children. Traditionally, the wheezing, gasping and coughing of an asthma attack have been blamed on constriction of the breathing passages, and primary treatment has been with bronchodilating drugs, which relieve the symptoms by dilating, or widening, the bronchial tubes.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
Regarding your editorial on the health risks of pesticide use, asthma was once thought to be caused by pesticides, but the link was later disproved ( "Understanding pesticide risks," Feb. 20). According to recent studies by the National Institutes of Health, asthma is caused by allergens and genetics. The list of allergens includes cockroaches, rodents, dust mites, dogs, cats, molds and fungi -- but not pesticides. Len Pagley, Glenn Burnie - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
The beginning of the school year is a time when allergy symptoms in children may flare up. Dr. Manav Singla, a specialist at the Asthma Allergy & Sinus Center in Baltimore, said the change in fall temperature, allergens and environment during this time can trigger an increase in mucus production as well as increased inflammation in the large and small airways of the lungs. He talks about how parents can help their children manage asthma symptoms. What is asthma and what are the symptoms?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 3, 2013
Sufferers of chronic hives and rashes could benefit from a commonly-used asthma drug, Johns Hopkins researchers have found. Scientists found that a once-a-month dose of the drug omalizumab helped ease symptoms that standard antihistamines didn't. The drug was tested on 323 peple at 55 medical centers from 2009 to 2011. The subjects were mostly women and between the ages of 12 and 75. The participants had suffered with chronic hives and rash for at least six months and many had dealt with the condition for more than five years.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2013
The first winter after Danielle Smith bought her house in North Baltimore, the 35-year-old schoolteacher wondered if it even had a furnace, it was so cold and drafty. Now, with almost all new windows and several other energy-efficiency retrofits, Smith said, her four-bedroom single-story home in the mid-Govans neighborhood is cozier, less costly to heat — and apparently healthier for her 8-year-old son, Akil. "You can feel the difference," she said, as her son played on the carpeted living room floor at her feet.
NEWS
April 18, 2012
Mr. Robert Monroe, Schuykill, afflicted with the above distressing malady.  Symptoms-- Great languor, flatulency, disturbed rest, nervous, head ache, difficulty of breathing, tightness and stricture across the breast, dizziness, nervous irritability and restlessness, could not lie in a horizontal position without the sensation of impending suffocation, palpitation of the heart, distressing cough, costiveness, pain in the stomach, drowsiness and...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | December 29, 2011
Researchers working to discover why African Americans disproportionately suffer from asthma are planning to map the genetic code of 1,000 people of African descent in four years. The Johns Hopkins -led team of experts in genetics, immunology, epidemiology and allergic disease want to know why up to 20 percent of black people have asthma. The disease afflicts 20 million Americans, causes difficultly breathing, wheezing and tightness in the chest and can lead to hospitalization and death.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Johns Hopkins researchers, in the largest study to date, will map the genetic code for asthma in people of African descent in hopes of better understanding why the disease and other allergy-related ailments disproportionately afflict that population. Until now, the link between genetics and asthma has been studied using mostly men and women of white European descent. The Hopkins researchers announced Thursday that they will leverage data from other genome projects to take the first wide-scale look at how hereditary factors affect African-Americans who have the disease, which causes wheezing and difficulty breathing, and which can lead to death if not treated.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1994
The Maryland medical examiner's office yesterday ruled that a 33-year-old inmate in the Baltimore County Detention Center who died last week was the victim of an acute asthma attack.Alfred J. Oliver, who was serving time for a shoplifting conviction, was pronounced dead at 9:23 a.m. Jan. 30 at St. Joseph's Hospital, about 2 1/2 hours after he first complained of breathing problems at the jail.Although the jail infirmary staff did not call for an ambulance until Mr. Oliver had stopped breathing, James M. Dean, the detention center administrator, said, "I do not feel like there was any negligence clinically in trying to treat the man."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Johns Hopkins researchers, in the largest study to date, will map the genetic code for asthma in people of African descent in hopes of better understanding why the disease and other allergy-related ailments disproportionately afflict that population. Until now, the link between genetics and asthma has been studied using mostly men and women of white European descent. The Hopkins researchers announced Thursday that they will leverage data from other genome projects to take the first wide-scale look at how hereditary factors affect African-Americans who have the disease, which causes wheezing and difficulty breathing, and which can lead to death if not treated.
NEWS
July 16, 2011
Like Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, I am one of the over 17.5 million Americans with asthma, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. That is 7.7 percent of the population, almost as high a percentage as those who smoke in Howard County. So I read with dismay and surprise in the recent editorial ("Howard County is no nanny state," July 14) that The Sun and others do not consider outdoor smoking in a park to be a health hazard. Most picnic areas have a cloister of tables much closer than the article's cited 100-yard distance, and if someone comes to the table next to you and starts to puff, contrary to the implication in the article, it is not so simple to pack up all your stuff and move outside the danger zone.
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