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NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | August 31, 2003
Asters are stars of the late summer and early fall garden. Getrude Jekyll, English grand dame of perennial garden design, loved them so much that she devoted an entire border to asters (whose name means 'star' in Greek). Often called Michaelmas daisies since most varieties are in bloom during the feast of St. Michael and All Angels on Sept. 29, asters are wonderful bridges between dying summer perennials and autumn's resurgent bloom. Most start blooming in late summer. "Asters give you a boost of color when other things have petered out," says Bob Hill, horticulturist at Park Seed Co. in Greenwood, S.C. For example, a couple of 'Purple Dome' asters, stuffed into the slot where the now ratty-looking lamb's ears (Stachys)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In case you pay attention to liturgical calendars, or in case you don't, Nov. 2 is All Souls' Days in Catholic tradition. That's reason enough for me to share one of my favorite art songs -- "Allerseelen" ("All Souls' Day") by Richard Strauss. That guy sure could write 'em. This vintage, gorgeous performance by tenor Rudolf Schock should please all souls. Needless to say, the song isn't about the actual fesast day, but about love. Here's a loose translation of the poem by Hermann von Gilm zu Roseneg: Put the fragrant reseda on the table.
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NEWS
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,Knight-Ridder newspapers | October 13, 1991
When people think of autumn color, they look to the trees. But, too often, the burden of carrying a whole season's beauty rests upon their strong branches.Chrysanthemums, of course, share the glory. In eye-catching colors of golden yellows, sparkling purples and mellow reds, potted chrysanthemums purchased at garden centers provide the easiest and quickest way to give your front steps or flower beds the look of autumn.Yet there is more to autumn in the garden than just colorful foliage and gorgeous chrysanthemums.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
On August 6, 2007, M r. John Jacob Aster Fitez Family and Friends are invited to call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, on Wednesday 3-5 & 7-9 PM where funeral services will be held on Thursday at 10:00 AM. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park.
NEWS
By Dolly Merrit | October 6, 1991
Fall is a season often taken for granted. In the cycle of seasons, autumn is typecast as a period of dying and a depressing prelude to winter. In Howard County, the beautiful colors, the smells, the comfortable, clear days, belie the stereotype. Every sense tells us that the fall is definitely not an unfortunate demise to better times.Allen Lacy, garden columnist for the New York Times, speculates in his new book, "The Garden in Autumn," that fall got its bad reputation in Europe, especially England, where, because of its latitude, fall is wet, dank and cold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In case you pay attention to liturgical calendars, or in case you don't, Nov. 2 is All Souls' Days in Catholic tradition. That's reason enough for me to share one of my favorite art songs -- "Allerseelen" ("All Souls' Day") by Richard Strauss. That guy sure could write 'em. This vintage, gorgeous performance by tenor Rudolf Schock should please all souls. Needless to say, the song isn't about the actual fesast day, but about love. Here's a loose translation of the poem by Hermann von Gilm zu Roseneg: Put the fragrant reseda on the table.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
Even after a year as miserable as this one, hope springs eternal in a gardener's heart. Some rain and we're ready to dive back in and revitalize our yards. Fortunately, there are super autumn-blooming plants -- some newly hybridized -- to add to the fall floral palette.An exciting plant this fall is the majestic chelone 'Hotlips,' whose common name -- turtlehead -- describes the shape of the mauve-pink blossoms. A shade lover, it sends up dark green, three-foot spires topped with tousled blooms.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 16, 1991
To most Americans, the desert that links Kuwait and Saudi Arabia seems a dreadful place indeed. Television shows us a desolate landscape, seemingly bereft of vegetation. The region appears to be an endless swath of sand, punctuated only by trenches and tank tracks.Surely flora cannot exist in such a wasteland.Oh, but it can.Spring is nigh in the Persian Gulf. Despite all the bombs and missiles, much of the desert is coming to life.The changes may be startling.Imagine allied troops marching through colorful pockets of wildflowers, grasses and flowering bulbs.
NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | April 17, 1991
There's a tiny farmer at work in gardens, orchards and fields all over Carroll County.The worker attracts little notice, but the job must be done or spring's proliferating blossoms would not exist, fields of clover would produce no seed and holly trees and goldenrod and purple aster would no longer reproduce.The tiny farmer is, of course, the bee, transporter of pollen andnectar, propagator of practically every species of flowering plant.Wayne Straight, past vice president of the Carroll County Beekeepers Association, has devoted years to studying this omnipresent insect.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
On August 6, 2007, M r. John Jacob Aster Fitez Family and Friends are invited to call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, on Wednesday 3-5 & 7-9 PM where funeral services will be held on Thursday at 10:00 AM. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2005
We often think of gardening as a boys-and-girls-of-summer game. By late August, we're usually ready to stagger off the field and retire to the clubhouse. But with planning and mulch, September can be a wonderful reawakening in the garden. Which means the view from the clubhouse can be spectacular. "It's one of the best times in the garden," says Rae Ann McInnis, horticulturist with the Horticulture Society of Maryland. "In fall you can wake up the garden with blooms," agrees Tasanee Mack, a landscape designer at Homestead Gardens in Davidsonville.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | August 31, 2003
Asters are stars of the late summer and early fall garden. Getrude Jekyll, English grand dame of perennial garden design, loved them so much that she devoted an entire border to asters (whose name means 'star' in Greek). Often called Michaelmas daisies since most varieties are in bloom during the feast of St. Michael and All Angels on Sept. 29, asters are wonderful bridges between dying summer perennials and autumn's resurgent bloom. Most start blooming in late summer. "Asters give you a boost of color when other things have petered out," says Bob Hill, horticulturist at Park Seed Co. in Greenwood, S.C. For example, a couple of 'Purple Dome' asters, stuffed into the slot where the now ratty-looking lamb's ears (Stachys)
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
Even after a year as miserable as this one, hope springs eternal in a gardener's heart. Some rain and we're ready to dive back in and revitalize our yards. Fortunately, there are super autumn-blooming plants -- some newly hybridized -- to add to the fall floral palette.An exciting plant this fall is the majestic chelone 'Hotlips,' whose common name -- turtlehead -- describes the shape of the mauve-pink blossoms. A shade lover, it sends up dark green, three-foot spires topped with tousled blooms.
NEWS
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,Knight-Ridder newspapers | October 13, 1991
When people think of autumn color, they look to the trees. But, too often, the burden of carrying a whole season's beauty rests upon their strong branches.Chrysanthemums, of course, share the glory. In eye-catching colors of golden yellows, sparkling purples and mellow reds, potted chrysanthemums purchased at garden centers provide the easiest and quickest way to give your front steps or flower beds the look of autumn.Yet there is more to autumn in the garden than just colorful foliage and gorgeous chrysanthemums.
NEWS
By Dolly Merrit | October 6, 1991
Fall is a season often taken for granted. In the cycle of seasons, autumn is typecast as a period of dying and a depressing prelude to winter. In Howard County, the beautiful colors, the smells, the comfortable, clear days, belie the stereotype. Every sense tells us that the fall is definitely not an unfortunate demise to better times.Allen Lacy, garden columnist for the New York Times, speculates in his new book, "The Garden in Autumn," that fall got its bad reputation in Europe, especially England, where, because of its latitude, fall is wet, dank and cold.
NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | April 17, 1991
There's a tiny farmer at work in gardens, orchards and fields all over Carroll County.The worker attracts little notice, but the job must be done or spring's proliferating blossoms would not exist, fields of clover would produce no seed and holly trees and goldenrod and purple aster would no longer reproduce.The tiny farmer is, of course, the bee, transporter of pollen andnectar, propagator of practically every species of flowering plant.Wayne Straight, past vice president of the Carroll County Beekeepers Association, has devoted years to studying this omnipresent insect.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2005
We often think of gardening as a boys-and-girls-of-summer game. By late August, we're usually ready to stagger off the field and retire to the clubhouse. But with planning and mulch, September can be a wonderful reawakening in the garden. Which means the view from the clubhouse can be spectacular. "It's one of the best times in the garden," says Rae Ann McInnis, horticulturist with the Horticulture Society of Maryland. "In fall you can wake up the garden with blooms," agrees Tasanee Mack, a landscape designer at Homestead Gardens in Davidsonville.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 16, 1991
To most Americans, the desert that links Kuwait and Saudi Arabia seems a dreadful place indeed. Television shows us a desolate landscape, seemingly bereft of vegetation. The region appears to be an endless swath of sand, punctuated only by trenches and tank tracks.Surely flora cannot exist in such a wasteland.Oh, but it can.Spring is nigh in the Persian Gulf. Despite all the bombs and missiles, much of the desert is coming to life.The changes may be startling.Imagine allied troops marching through colorful pockets of wildflowers, grasses and flowering bulbs.
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