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By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 12, 2010
With a little luck, scientists and engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt will help to send a NASA spacecraft to land on an asteroid or on Venus late in this decade. The two proposed interplanetary missions with Goddard connections were among three selected Monday to receive $3.3 million each for further cost and feasibility study under NASA's New Frontiers program. Only one will be funded after a final cut later this year. The winning mission would have to launch by 2018, and cost less than $650 million.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Scientists have plenty of questions about a bizarre asteroid spotted spouting what looks like six comet-like tails, but they are nevertheless giving the public an opportunity to make their own queries about it. Researchers are holding a Google Hangout on Thursday to talk about the discovery, including how and when the asteroid was discovered, what its six tails are made of, and how common such asteroids are in space. The Baltimore-based Space Telescope Science Institute and NASA released images of the asteroid last Thursday . It was found by astronomers observing the solar system's asteroid belt using the Hubble Space Telescope.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
An asteroid was passing within 217,000 miles of Earth on Wednesday afternoon, closer than the moon's distance from the planet. The asteroid is known as  2014 DX110 and is estimated to be 100 feet wide, according to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. It was expected to reach its closest distance to Earth at about 4 p.m. The Slooh Community Observatory was broadcasting the fly-by live online . Scientists detect asteroids passing as closely about 20 times a year, according to JPL.  The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, known as "Spaceguard," monitors them.
NEWS
April 25, 1992
Here's something to worry about: A small asteroid -- a chunk of space debris perhaps a half-mile in diameter -- is on a collision course with Earth. A strike by a body that size could explode with the force of 25,000 hydrogen bombs, creating massive tidal waves and flinging enough dust into the atmosphere to block out sunlight for months. Civilization would collapse. Anyone who survived the initial impact would shortly die of starvation or exposure. Eventually all traces of human life would be extinguished from the planet.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
An asteroid was passing within 217,000 miles of Earth on Wednesday afternoon, closer than the moon's distance from the planet. The asteroid is known as  2014 DX110 and is estimated to be 100 feet wide, according to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. It was expected to reach its closest distance to Earth at about 4 p.m. The Slooh Community Observatory was broadcasting the fly-by live online . Scientists detect asteroids passing as closely about 20 times a year, according to JPL.  The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, known as "Spaceguard," monitors them.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
Soon after Valentine's Day in 1996, an asteroid named for the Greek god of love will become the target of a $125 million arrow shot into space by scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel.The interplanetary mission, dubbed Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), will attempt to place a satellite into orbit around the asteroid Eros by December 1998. It is one of NASA's "Discovery" series of "quicker and cheaper" space science missions.Eros is a chunk of rock about 22 miles long, circling the sun in a path that crosses the orbits of both Earth and Mars.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | April 7, 2009
In the 1998 movie Armageddon, audiences thrilled as Bruce Willis, Steve Buscemi and Ben Affleck scrambled to save life on Earth from destruction by an asteroid - and the vast majority left the theater safely confident that such a far-fetched threat could not possibly reflect reality. They should not have been so sure. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory reported that on March 2, asteroid 2009 DD45 came within about 48,000 miles of Earth. In astronomical terms, that's way too close for comfort.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
Lord Baltimore's name has now been flung far beyond his namesake city on the Chesapeake Bay, deep into the Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter.A 10-mile-wide rock orbiting some 260 million miles from the sun has been dubbed Asteroid Baltimore by the International Astronomical Union. The naming is in celebration of the bicentennials of the city and the Maryland Academy of Sciences.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will get a "deed" to the asteroid as part of this week's opening of an exhibit at the Maryland Science Center.
NEWS
By Peninsula Times Tribune | September 29, 1991
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- The chance that the Earth will be struck by a milewide asteroid in the next year is greater than the chance that any given person will be struck by lightning -- about 1 in a million. But since an asteroid that size could destroy half the planet's population, some NASA scientists say it's a statistic worth worrying about."We know that the Earth exists in a swarm of comets and asteroids," David Morrison, chief of the Space Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center here, said last week.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Scientists have plenty of questions about a bizarre asteroid spotted spouting what looks like six comet-like tails, but they are nevertheless giving the public an opportunity to make their own queries about it. Researchers are holding a Google Hangout on Thursday to talk about the discovery, including how and when the asteroid was discovered, what its six tails are made of, and how common such asteroids are in space. The Baltimore-based Space Telescope Science Institute and NASA released images of the asteroid last Thursday . It was found by astronomers observing the solar system's asteroid belt using the Hubble Space Telescope.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
A 150-foot wide asteroid is expected to pass closely by Earth on Friday, and though it will be difficult to see in skies over the U.S., the fly-by will be broadcast online. Backyard astronomers on the other side of the world will be able to see the asteroid, known as 2012 DA14, as the object makes its closest pass by Earth. But by the time it comes into view over Baltimore's skies, it will have moved far enough away that it will be tougher to see. NASA explains here :  "It will brighten only to magnitude 7.5, too faint to be seen with the naked eye, but easily visible with a good set of binoculars or a small telescope.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As if some weren't already on edge with the prospect of an asteroid passing 17,000 miles from Earth, a meteorite exploded over Russian skies injuring 500 people. Scientists say the two aren't related , but there is a long list of questions many may have beyond that. Here are some answers, according to Richard Henry, academy professor in Johns Hopkins University's Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy: What is the difference between a meteor and an asteroid?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt will get a $128 million slice of a new mission to grab a sample from an asteroid and return it to Earth in 2023. NASA selected the $800 million OSIRIS-Rex mission for funding Wednesday, passing over competing proposals to send spacecraft to Venus and the moon. The work will be led by Michael J. Drake at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and managed by Goddard. Engineers at the space center will also build one of its instruments.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 12, 2010
With a little luck, scientists and engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt will help to send a NASA spacecraft to land on an asteroid or on Venus late in this decade. The two proposed interplanetary missions with Goddard connections were among three selected Monday to receive $3.3 million each for further cost and feasibility study under NASA's New Frontiers program. Only one will be funded after a final cut later this year. The winning mission would have to launch by 2018, and cost less than $650 million.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 12, 2010
With a little luck, scientists and engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt will help to send a NASA spacecraft to land on an asteroid or on Venus late in this decade. The two proposed interplanetary missions with Goddard connections were among three selected Monday to receive $3.3 million each for further cost and feasibility study under NASA's New Frontiers program. Only one will be funded after a final cut later this year. The winning mission would have to launch by 2018, and cost less than $650 million.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2008
If you're reading this Tuesday morning (or any time thereafter), then scientists were right: An asteroid the size of a city block did not crash into the Earth as we slept. OK, there was never any danger of that. Asteroid 2007 TU24 swept by the planet at 3:33 a.m. EST at a safe distance of 334,000 miles - roughly one-and-a-half times the distance from Earth to the moon. But it was the closest an asteroid this size has come since 1985, and the closest one we know about until 2027. Had Earth been in the bulls-eye, TU24 would not have burned up harmlessly.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 9, 1992
A research arm of the Johns Hopkins University has been chosen to design a spacecraft intended to take the first close-up look at the kind of asteroid that could one day collide with Earth, officials said yesterday.Hopkins' Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel has been given a $450,000 contract by NASA for preliminary work on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous satellite, called NEAR. If NASA and Congress approve construction of the compact $150 million spacecraft, it could begin orbiting an asteroid called "Nereus" in January 2000.
NEWS
April 10, 2009
Warmongering adds to economic woes I appreciate that The Baltimore Sun has again placed the quagmire in Afghanistan on the front page, where it belongs ("Afghan bombings expected to worsen," April 5). As someone who has been protesting the invasion of that desperately poor country since 2001, I believe the war should always be on the front page, as misbegotten military adventures mean death and destruction for all sides. And to be frank, it is utter madness, especially as we face economic devastation, to expend billions of tax dollars funding wars and the occupation of the Palestinian people.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | April 7, 2009
In the 1998 movie Armageddon, audiences thrilled as Bruce Willis, Steve Buscemi and Ben Affleck scrambled to save life on Earth from destruction by an asteroid - and the vast majority left the theater safely confident that such a far-fetched threat could not possibly reflect reality. They should not have been so sure. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory reported that on March 2, asteroid 2009 DD45 came within about 48,000 miles of Earth. In astronomical terms, that's way too close for comfort.
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