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By LAURENCE A. ELDER | January 27, 1995
Los Angeles -- Ty Cobb -- best baseball player ever?Tommy Lee Jones stars in ''Cobb,'' a movie based on the life of tTCbaseball player Ty Cobb, who played from 1905 to 1928. In a review of the book on which the movie is based, it was said that ''Cobb also became, arguably, the greatest baseball player who ever lived.''Oh yeah? Says who? In ''Baseball,'' the Ken Burns documentary, all-stars from the Negro leagues played all-stars from the major leagues and beat them more often than not. So, place a huge asterisk next to Ty Cobb's name.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 3, 2013
Despite a foul-smelling algae bloom and fish kill this time last year, Baltimore's ailing harbor actually earned a C-minus grade overall for water quality in 2012, according to the latest ecological report card issued by the Healthy Harbor campaign. But even that mediocre rating, to be issued Monday at an Inner Harbor press conference, comes with a big asterisk, as the report card's compilers note that rainfall last year was far below normal, reducing the amount of pollution washed off city and suburban streets, parking lots and yards.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 3, 2013
Despite a foul-smelling algae bloom and fish kill this time last year, Baltimore's ailing harbor actually earned a C-minus grade overall for water quality in 2012, according to the latest ecological report card issued by the Healthy Harbor campaign. But even that mediocre rating, to be issued Monday at an Inner Harbor press conference, comes with a big asterisk, as the report card's compilers note that rainfall last year was far below normal, reducing the amount of pollution washed off city and suburban streets, parking lots and yards.
NEWS
February 11, 2009
Come on, what baseball fan was genuinely surprised by superstar Alex Rodriguez's admission this week that he used steroids while playing for the Texas Rangers from 2001 until 2003? Probably just those who believed the Yankees slugger when he previously said he'd never taken a performance-enhancing drug. It's a small universe of the eternally naive - die-hard fans and the SEC. This much can be said in A-Rod's defense - he's got a smarter sense of public relations than Roger Clemens, Mark McGwire, Barry Bonds and those others who believe it's useful to deny, deny, deny the evidence of drug use no matter how overwhelming.
SPORTS
By Steve Marcus and Steve Marcus,Newsday | August 1, 1991
The late Ford Frick was known as the asterisk commissioner, but Fay Vincent may earn an exclamation point for what he plans to do.Thirty years ago Frick attached a verbal asterisk to the fabled single season home-run record by separating Roger Maris from Babe Ruth. Maris hit 61 homers in a 162-game season in 1961. Ruth hit 60 in a 154-game schedule in 1927. Since 1961, baseball's record books have separated the two players by the number of games played.Vincent wants to change that. "I am inclined to do whatever can be done," he said yesterday.
SPORTS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Should Barry Bonds surpass Babe Ruth for second place on baseball's list of all-time home run leaders - he is two short of tying him - his feat will be etched in baseball record books just like any other accomplishment. The statistics will carry no asterisks, no references to the steroid allegations that have haunted the San Francisco Giants' slugger in recent years. But there will also be no end to the speculation over whether Bonds' numbers are as legitimate as those of the greats before him. "I would say that the impact of the numbers will never be the same," said Marty Eichler of Abingdon, among the baseball fans interviewed at random last week about the prospect of Bonds' surpassing Ruth in homers.
NEWS
By Julia Keller and By Julia Keller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 18, 2001
As punctuation marks go, it's hard to top the asterisk - because the asterisk is there to top everything else. The asterisk always gets the last word. It adds a dubious, "Well, yes, but ..." The asterisk is the elbow in the ribs, the wink, the smirk, the disclaimer, the qualification. It's hard to love the asterisk, just as it's hard to love a smarty-pants showoff. The asterisk looks like a tick on the page and, fittingly, often seems to suck the lifeblood out of a bold, forthright statement by sly insinuation: "Let's not be too hasty," the asterisk implies.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
During the final weeks of the 1961 season, New York Yankees outfielder Roger Maris visited a doctor in Baltimore, convinced that he had contracted a serious illness because his hair had begun to fall out in small clumps.It was not a happy time.The doctor reassured him that the hair loss was merely the result of the stress that accompanied Maris' quest to break Babe Ruth's single-season home run record. It was the same kind of stress that undoubtedly is wearing on St. Louis Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire as he closes in on the record Maris set 37 years ago.Only much, much worse.
SPORTS
November 23, 2005
"Man, a punter? That needs an asterisk. And next to that asterisk, it should say, `Jim Marshall, defensive end, holds the real record.'" Ted Cottrell Minnesota Vikings defensive coordinator, on New York Giants punter Jeff Feagles about to break Marshall's NFL record for consecutive games "Countless doses of [Dr. Dre's song] `The Chronic' never made me want to smoke marijuana, sleep with half the campus or become a gangster. ... So I can't understand why people believe that a bunch of Miami football players are misogynists, potential rapists and derelicts just because they recorded a racy rap song with their friends two years ago."
SPORTS
By Brian Ettkin | November 10, 2007
We protect our babies. We swaddle them in love and defend them with fangs bared. So when Don Shula lobs grenades from the mountaintop, it's somewhat understandable. Because the New England Patriots threaten Shula's baby. No NFL team before the 1972 Miami Dolphins or since has completed an undefeated season. The 1989 San Francisco 49ers, with Joe Montana and Jerry Rice on offense, Ronnie Lott and Charles Haley on defense, and Steve Young as a backup, didn't do it. The 1985 Chicago Bears, who had nine Pro Bowl players and crushed opponents 91-10 in the postseason, didn't do it. The 1978 Pittsburgh Steelers, who had nine Hall of Fame players, didn't do it. They were awe-inspiring.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | July 3, 2008
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and the man who possesses Barry Bonds' record-setting 756th home run ball had reached an impasse. And then they hadn't. By the grace of God and a deliveryman, fans who make the yearly trek to Cooperstown, N.Y., won't be denied the chance to stare at a $12 baseball. Could any of us really live in a world where that sort of thing might have happened? Fashion designer Marc Ecko bought the souvenir for more than $752,467 last September. He apparently had promised to donate it to the Hall "unconditionally," until deciding later that he'd rather lend it, which sounds an awful lot like a condition.
SPORTS
By Brian Ettkin | November 10, 2007
We protect our babies. We swaddle them in love and defend them with fangs bared. So when Don Shula lobs grenades from the mountaintop, it's somewhat understandable. Because the New England Patriots threaten Shula's baby. No NFL team before the 1972 Miami Dolphins or since has completed an undefeated season. The 1989 San Francisco 49ers, with Joe Montana and Jerry Rice on offense, Ronnie Lott and Charles Haley on defense, and Steve Young as a backup, didn't do it. The 1985 Chicago Bears, who had nine Pro Bowl players and crushed opponents 91-10 in the postseason, didn't do it. The 1978 Pittsburgh Steelers, who had nine Hall of Fame players, didn't do it. They were awe-inspiring.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call in Allentown, Pa | October 28, 2007
It's the catch, the loophole, the gotcha: It is mouseprint in advertising. Mouseprint is the fine type in print advertisements, seemingly so small only a mouse could read it. Sometimes it features an asterisk relaying details on the ifs, ands or buts surrounding the offer. On the radio it is the fast-talk provisos, conditions and requisites. In television it's the tiny disclaimer along the bottom of the picture, sometimes indecipherable to anyone without a 60-inch screen and a digital video recorder to freeze-frame the petite type.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | September 20, 2007
After the Ravens practiced yesterday, Brian Billick declared that in no way was he implying that the New York Jets and coach Eric Mangini were cheating in Sunday's game. Too bad. I had a bagful of asterisks with me, ready to sprinkle all over it. That's my side gig now. I've got asterisks for sale, first come, first served. The demand has risen so high so fast, someone had to step in, figure out who and what are deserving, and apply accordingly. And, of course, cash in on the trend. (Goodness knows, I can't retire on what I make writing for newspapers.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 28, 2006
ST. LOUIS -- The forecast called for showers, so it shouldn't have been a surprise that as a couple dozen grown men created a mountain of excited ballplayers right there on the Busch Stadium infield, confetti rained on a cold Missouri night. A few minutes later, their leader, Tony La Russa, stood at the microphone and addressed Redbird Nation, a subset of Americana drunk with a feeling they hadn't known for more than two decades. "You know the expression there ain't no bad win?" La Russa asked.
SPORTS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Should Barry Bonds surpass Babe Ruth for second place on baseball's list of all-time home run leaders - he is two short of tying him - his feat will be etched in baseball record books just like any other accomplishment. The statistics will carry no asterisks, no references to the steroid allegations that have haunted the San Francisco Giants' slugger in recent years. But there will also be no end to the speculation over whether Bonds' numbers are as legitimate as those of the greats before him. "I would say that the impact of the numbers will never be the same," said Marty Eichler of Abingdon, among the baseball fans interviewed at random last week about the prospect of Bonds' surpassing Ruth in homers.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan organization that works to promote political reponsibility through the informed and active participation of citizens in their governemnt. The League does not support or oppose any political party or candidate.The candidates' answers appear as submitted in reponse to a nonpartisan questionnaire. If answers exceeded the specified word limitation, the additional words were cut where practical, or at the end of the candidate's statement. All candidates were asked the same questions as other candidates running for the same office.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 7, 1998
ST. LOUIS -- The four sons of Roger Maris sat in the front row at Busch Stadium yesterday, listening to the cheers rain down on Mark McGwire.The cheers their father never heard.Maris was scorned 37 years ago for having the audacity to break Babe Ruth's record of 60 home runs in a season.McGwire, who needs one more homer to tie Maris' record, has become a national hero.Fair? Hardly. But Maris' sons, aged 35-39 and residents of Gainesville, Fla., aren't bitter at the fickle winds of public opinion.
SPORTS
November 23, 2005
"Man, a punter? That needs an asterisk. And next to that asterisk, it should say, `Jim Marshall, defensive end, holds the real record.'" Ted Cottrell Minnesota Vikings defensive coordinator, on New York Giants punter Jeff Feagles about to break Marshall's NFL record for consecutive games "Countless doses of [Dr. Dre's song] `The Chronic' never made me want to smoke marijuana, sleep with half the campus or become a gangster. ... So I can't understand why people believe that a bunch of Miami football players are misogynists, potential rapists and derelicts just because they recorded a racy rap song with their friends two years ago."
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 21, 2005
Barry Bonds laughs. Barry Bonds scowls. Barry Bonds scolds. Barry Bonds reflects. And then, of course, Barry Bonds homers. For the first time in almost a year, the Barry Bonds Road Show - part comedy, part tragedy - was back on center stage yesterday. As always, it was great theater. The first stop on this abbreviated, three-city, season-ending tour was the nation's capital, and a basement interview room at Robert F. Kennedy Stadium. There, for 13 minutes, Bonds was caustic. Engaging.
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