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NEWS
August 4, 1996
Photographs in the Real Estate section in last Sunday's editions of The Sun were credited incorrectly. The photos were provided by the National Association of Home Builders Research Center.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/04/96
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BUSINESS
By KEN HARNEY | February 1, 2009
LAS VEGAS - If you'd love to purchase a new house but you're sitting on the fence, what exactly would it take to get you to buy? Mortgage rates lower than today's 5 percent range? Smaller down payments? Below-market value pricing? Special amenity packages? Or a big tax credit? What's the magic mix that will get you motivated? Or is it unlikely you'll get off the fence as long as you're worried about the economy and further drops in real estate values? Questions like these are at the core of the housing industry's problem: Builders are stuck with bulging inventories of homes - most of them priced lower than six months or a year ago - that are still not selling.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2000
The National Association of Home Builders Research Center, in Upper Marlboro, announced that it is expanding its capabilities to allow for the testing of wall structural systems. The center said it is developing a wall assembly racking test frame -- called RACKER -- that will allow for the controlled testing of wall systems, including such things as foundation attachments, joists, studs, windows, doors and roofs. It can measure the lateral strength of a home. Lateral strength "is the building's ability to resist being pushed over," said Thomas Kenney, director of laboratory services for the center.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
The nation's financial meltdown dealt a setback to a housing market that was showing glimmers of recovery in Maryland, and local builders said yesterday that they are bracing for another tough year. During a real estate and construction forecast conference, area builders said they are struggling through a period of slow sales and limited financing that has forced housing companies to lay off workers, put projects on hold or rethink the type of homes they can sell. The housing slowdown began about two years ago. Experts at the annual conference in Woodlawn, sponsored by the Home Builders Association of Maryland, said the bloated inventory of new and existing homes was starting to come into balance as new housing starts dropped sharply this year.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2001
Janette Little honored for work with NAACP Janette Little, a sales associate with O'Conor, Piper & Flynn ERA in Owings Mills, was honored last month by the NAACP's Baltimore branch for her work with its Economic Development Home Ownership and Business Initiative. Little was among seven people honored for working with the NAACP to provide outreach, education and technical assistance in homeownership and small business development to under-served communities. News in brief Masonry Homes' bike team raised more than $2,700 Sept.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001
Since the first Earth Day celebration in 1970, new homes have become 100 percent more energy efficient and construction has become more conservation friendly, according to a new publication from the National Association of Home Builders. The report, "Building Greener, Building Better: The Quiet Revolution," reviews the materials, products and processes that the housing industry now uses to provide "greener" housing choices. Some examples: Different wood products have reduced the need for plywood from older, mature trees by 60 percent.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 22, 2004
An index of U.S. mortgage applications rose last week for the first time in four weeks as interest rates dropped to their lowest since July of last year, an industry group report says. The Mortgage Bankers Association's index climbed 4.9 percent to 837.1. The home purchase applications measure rose 2.9 percent to 413.9 and is close to the record it reached last month. The average 30-year fixed mortgage rate dropped to 5.58 percent, the lowest since July. The National Association of Home Builders forecasts that home sales this year will be the second-highest on record, as an improving labor market and rising incomes underpin demand and the economy.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 25, 2004
U.S. homebuilder optimism held close this month to an almost four-year high after sales reached a record in 2003 and orders picked up in the fourth quarter, an industry survey showed. The National Association of Home Builders' housing market index registered 68 in January, compared with 70 the month before. Readings above 50 mean more builders view conditions as good than poor. The index has held above 60 since June. Centex Corp. and Pulte Homes Inc. are among builders whose orders increased in the final three months of 2003.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1997
Manufactured home shipments rose 7% in 1996Factory shipments of manufactured homes totaled 363,411 in 1996, a 7 percent increase over the 339,601 units moved in 1995, according to figures released by the Manufactured Housing Institute.December shipments, however, showed a 4.5 percent decline to 22,947 homes from 24,034 for the final month of 1995.The exception was Texas, where December shipments were 34.6 percent higher last year than they were in 1995. For all of 1996, shipments to Texas were up 20 percent.
BUSINESS
By The Dallas Morning News | February 2, 2003
People living large, as in homes, seems to be on the decline There are signs that Americans' obsession with living larger is starting to wane. "We are seeing a flattening of the size for the first time in six years," Gopal Ahluwalia, head of research for the National Association of Home Builders, said at last month's homebuilders show in Las Vegas. Last year, the average home built in America was 2,310 square feet, down slightly from 2,332 in 2001. The average home is still more than 50 percent larger than in the 1970s.
BUSINESS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun reporter | September 9, 2007
Showers that warm to the perfect temperature while the bather is still in bed. Soft lighting that facilitates midnight trips to the bathroom. Dishwashers that can be activated from the other side of the world. High-tech home improvements put a homeowner at ease, saving time and (sometimes) money and creating an aura of futuristic pampering. By comparison, more traditional updates can seem a little bit dull. A new granite countertop, however attractive, can't personalize a room's temperature or dim the lights at the kids' bedtime.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2007
Maryland may be "America in Miniature" to some, but the state's housing has been tending toward the plus size, the latest census data show. Though middling in overall population, Maryland ranks second only to Utah - the state with the nation's largest households - in the share of its housing with four bedrooms or more, the U.S. Census Bureau reported yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
Hurricane Katrina's destruction is putting more pressure on the already heated housing market - even in the Baltimore area, a thousand miles away. Market prices nationwide increased 5 percent to 10 percent for lumber and 20 percent to 25 percent for plywood and oriented strand board between Wednesday and yesterday, said Mark Hunt, who manages three local building-material facilities for Builders FirstSource. He attributes the unusually large increase to panic as much as anything else. Lumber and its related products total about a quarter of the cost of home construction.
BUSINESS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2005
YASMIN GELLER couldn't sleep until she flew her carpenters to their Illinois headquarters and back to Green Spring Valley to rework the posts that she thought marred the contemporary lines of the 23-foot spiral staircase in her new home. The maple-and-glass staircase - a showstopper - had to be just right. After all, she and her husband, Ira, planned to spend the rest of their lives in the 12,000-square-foot, multimillion-dollar abode. The house was their investment. Another baby. A jewel.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 24, 2005
OK, NOW WE HAVE a housing bubble. How do we know? Real estate professionals, who aren't even allowed to think that homes might be, uh, overpriced, are publicly worried. Speculators snapping up homes they won't live in and may not be able to rent have given the market a new tier of foam and raised chances it will all end badly, pros say. There is "a growing presence of investors or speculators or whatever you want to call them, especially in hot housing markets," says David Seiders, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 28, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. orders for durable goods rose in September for the third time in four months, and sales of new homes unexpectedly increased. Bookings for items made to last at least three years increased 0.2 percent to $195.7 billion, driven by demand for military hardware and business equipment, the Commerce Department said yesterday. Durable goods orders had declined 0.5 percent in August but rose in June and July. Orders for defense hardware soared 27 percent last month, the most since June.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1994
The Midwest remained the least expensive region in the nation to buy a house during the July-September period, a National Association of Home Builders report released yesterday shows.Listed below are the 10 most affordable and 10 least affordable U.S. housing markets in the third quarter, along with the rankings for Baltimore and Washington. The number corresponding to each area is the percentage of the homes sold that were within reach of the median-income household at the prevailing mortgage interest rate.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000
Gemcraft Homes has been named the 19th-fastest- growing builder in the country, up from No. 24 last year in the National Association of Home Builders' September issue of Builder magazine. The survey, in its second year, ranked the 90 fastest-growing builders in the country. Fueling the Fallston-based company's rise in the rankings is its performance over the past three years: It closed on 293 units in 1999 compared with 78 units in 1997, and more than tripled its revenue from $14 million to $48 million during that same period.
BUSINESS
By Shruti Mathur and Shruti Mathur,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
Hidden under Esther Siegel's white oak flooring lie the first drafts of history. Recycled newspapers and salvaged firewood help make up the sub-flooring in her Takoma Park home. Unlike traditional plywood, the environmentally friendly sheeting material does not emit gas and can be found at local hardware stores. Siegel's floor, like many other parts of her house, is constructed from discarded materials that save her money and energy. The idea of reusing products around the house that are energy-efficient and environmentally friendly is commonly referred to as "green" building.
BUSINESS
By From staff, Los Angeles Times and Bloomberg News reports | April 18, 2004
Bilingual workshop on buying a home set for Saturday Baltimore's Hispanic Liaison Office will hold a bilingual homebuying workshop next weekend. The session will include information about financing options, government incentives and the procedures involved in buying a home in Baltimore. Real estate professionals will provide information and answer questions. The workshop will be the fourth held by the liaison office. It is aimed at increasing homeownership by Hispanics. The event is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to noon Saturday at St. Patrick's Church hall, 1728 Bank St. Information or registration: Lorena Beltran, 410-545-6532.
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