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NEWS
March 13, 2014
There has been a lot of heated rhetoric recently about the American Studies Association boycott of Israel and academic freedom and a lot of wild accusations being tossed around, but on thing seems to be missing from this whole brouhaha ( "A chilling effect," March 10). People keep talking about "discrimination," but there doesn't seem to be any realization of who exactly is being discriminated against, with both supporters of Israel and supporters of academia claiming to be the "victims.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Johns Hopkins isn't the only area Division III program with an untarnished record in 2014. Stevenson is 4-0 overall and 3-0 in the Middle Atlantic Conference and earned votes in the latest American Football Coaches Association poll. It's the first time the program has won its first four games of the season, and the team has already matched single-season records in overall victories and league wins set last year. Considering that the Mustangs were 8-22 overall and 6-20 in the conference, the current run might be shocking to some, but not to coach Ed Hottle.
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NEWS
January 29, 1996
The Savage Community Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Carroll Baldwin Hall.The association, which creates and supports community activities, will elect a board of directions.Information: (301) 725-1089.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Lecturing on the benefits of regular exercise won't change anyone's sedentary habits, but creating an environment that supports routine physical activity will. That's the message that public health, planning and transportation expert Mark Fenton plans to deliver Thursday evening at the Oakland Mills Meeting House at an event open to all county residents. "To Your Health: How Community Design Can Promote Healthy Lifestyles" is co-sponsored by the Columbia Association and the Horizon Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 4, 2001
It may have been icy cold outside, but inside the 5th Regiment Armory, hints of spring were everywhere at the American Heart Association's Heart Ball. Large backdrops painted as forests lined the walls, while corners of the room boasted clusters of real trees. Dining tables sprouted centerpieces of forsythia branches, daffodils and iris. Dinner began with a taste of winter, though. Each guest was greeted at his seat with a seafood appetizer sitting on a block of ice carved into a heart.
NEWS
March 17, 1994
The Maryland Aggregates Association Inc. will appeal last week's decision by an Anne Arundel Circuit judge to uphold a 1991 law intended to protect residents in four counties from property damage caused by mining operations.Association president Samuel W. Christine said his board of directors met yesterday and decided to file an appeal.The judge's ruling was a victory for the state and for property owners in Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick and Washington counties, who battled for about four years to get the bill passed.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 4, 1997
Twenty-two teams of cardiologists, nurses and other medical staff from 20 Central Maryland hospitals raised $80,243 for the American Heart Association at the Physicians' Teleparty held at Baltimore's World Trade Center Wednesday night.The top fund-raising team came from the Anne Arundel Medical Center, which raised $11,128. The money will be used for the association's research, education and community programs in Maryland.Pub Date: 4/04/97
NEWS
September 11, 2005
The second annual convention of the Sabbath-school association convened Sept. 8, 1868, in Westminster. Before the association formed, Protestant clergy met individually to discuss the usefulness of religious education, Sunday school classes and ways to extend their influence throughout the county. The group, comprising delegates from all Protestant denominations in Carroll County, met formally for the first time in 1867 and created the Sabbath-school association. -- History of Western Maryland, Volume 2 by J. Thomas Scharf, Page 822. Compiled by Sun researcher Shelia Jackson
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2000
The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association has resurrected a 5-year-old plan to build a $7 million visitors center on Light Street beside the Inner Harbor. The organization unveiled revised drawings last week of a 14,000-square-foot, two-story, glass-walled building immediately south of Harborplace where tourists could buy tickets for entertainment events and learn about Baltimore's culture and history. The association will seek about $4 million in the spring from the city, the state and a corporate sponsor to pay for the project, said Dan Lincoln, the group's vice president of tourism.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2002
The Columbia Association's earnings for the first quarter, which ended July 31, indicate the homeowners association appears on track to end the 2003 fiscal year next spring with a $4.4 million surplus. That surplus would be about $1.4 million larger than budgeted - partly due to increased income and partly because of operating savings, association President Maggie J. Brown told the association's board of directors Thursday night. New construction in Town Center and higher-than-expected property reassessments are contributing to the income increase, Brown said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
No lead is safe for the Towson football team. For the second time this season, the Tigers could not prevent an opponent from scoring in the final minute of regulation. On Saturday night, Maine drove 72 yards in 12 plays and 1 minute, 47 seconds to escape Johnny Unitas Stadium in Towson with a 27-24 win. An announced crowd of of 6,031 could only watch as the Black Bears - who snapped a two-game losing skid to improve to 2-2 overall and 1-0 in the Colonial Athletic Assocation - converted three fourth downs, including a 37-yard scoring strike from sophomore quarterback Dan Collins to sophomore wide receiver Jordan Dunn with 52 seconds remaining in regulation.
SPORTS
By Doug Donovan and Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens officials instructed employees Wednesday to save any documents, texts and emails related to Ray Rice in preparation for the NFL's investigation being conducted by former FBI director Robert S. Mueller III. The Ravens had already been told that team officials would be interviewed as part of the investigation into how Rice's domestic violence case was handled, but they had not been given any specific dates or instructions on what documents to...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Saturday's 31-20 victory over visiting North Carolina Central lifted Towson to a 2-2 record, marking their first time at .500 since the beginning of the season. The win also injected some much-needed confidence into the team, coach Rob Ambrose said Monday during his weekly conference call arranged by the Colonial Athletic Association. “These are college students with college-student problems and injuries,” he said. “Everybody's got problems. So it's about managing them as best we can and moving forward.
SPORTS
Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Big Ten announced Monday morning that Penn State junior cornerback Trevor Williams, a Calvert Hall graduate, is the conference's Defensive Player of the Week.   Williams, of Baltimore, intercepted two passes in the Nittany Lions' 13-10 victory over Rutgers on Saturday night, becoming the first Penn State player to have multiple interceptions in a game since 2010. He also made five tackles. Williams is one of three former Calvert Hall players in Penn State's secondary. Senior Adrian Amos is the Nittany Lions' starting strong safety and has been an honorable mention All-Big Ten selection the last two seasons.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Dr. Michael Beer, former chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University who was an environmentalist who worked diligently to clean up and protect Stony Run and the Jones Falls, died Aug. 22. He was 88. Dr. Beer was dining with his companion, Patricia Laidlaw, at her Roland Park home when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Union Memorial, where he was pronounced dead, said his daughter, Suzanne C. Beer of Middle River. "In the early days of molecular microscopy he was one of the key figures," said Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Merreen E. Kelly, a former Baltimore County administrative officer who earlier had been an associate superintendent of Baltimore County public schools, died Sunday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of lung cancer. He was 79. The son of Earl Linwood Kelly, a Koppers Co. foundry man, and Helen Marie Wilhem Kelly, a homemaker, Merreen Earl Kelly was born in Baltimore and raised in Arbutus. A 1953 graduate of Towson High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1957 in education from what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By American Optometric Association | September 14, 2003
Sixty percent of children diagnosed as troubled learners have undetected vision problems. -- American Optometric Association
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Towson released its first depth chart of the preseason Friday, and there were a couple notable surprises. The first entails the free safety position. Junior Christian Carpenter, an Aberdeen native and graduate who was a first-team All-Colonial Athletic Association selection last season, is second on the depth chart. Carpenter, who tied then-sophomore strong safety Donnell Lewis for the team lead in interceptions with four and ranked fourth in tackles with 98, has been leapfrogged by redshirt sophomore Jordan Mynatt.
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