Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAssisted Suicide
IN THE NEWS

Assisted Suicide

NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
In the first application of the state's assisted suicide ban, an Anne Arundel County judge found yesterday that the Crofton teen-ager who had a suicide pact with his girlfriend violated that law, but suffered from such severe depression that he is not responsible for his actions. Circuit Judge Pamela L. North rejected defense arguments that the law, sparked by Dr. Jack Kevorkian, applied only to health care workers helping terminally ill patients die. She said that if the General Assembly wanted to cover only assisted suicides of terminally ill people, legislators could have narrowed the law this spring.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2000
The 16-year-old Crofton boy charged with assisted suicide in the death of his girlfriend pleaded "not involved" yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, and his attorney asked the judge to dismiss the case, arguing that the law was never meant to apply in the case of a failed suicide pact between lovers. The request came during a two-hour hearing on charges that the boy helped Jennifer Garvey, 15, shoot herself in the head Oct. 18. He is the first person charged with violating Maryland's 1999 assisted suicide law and is also charged with possession of a handgun and reckless endangerment, all as a juvenile.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2000
The Crofton teen-ager awaiting trial on charges of helping his girlfriend kill herself in a failed suicide pact was granted a little more freedom yesterday. Judge Pamela L. North agreed to let the 16-year-old, who is on home detention, leave his mother's house from 9 a.m. to noon to job-hunt. "He is doing an excellent job, abiding by all the rules," said Kimber Davis, one of the youth's two public defenders. The youth is the first person accused of violating Maryland's ban on assisted suicide.
NEWS
March 11, 2000
MARYLAND legislators may have been spooked by the haunting demonstration of Jack Kevorkian's death machine on "60 Minutes" when they passed a law banning assisted suicides. But reckless doctors weren't the only people lawmakers wanted to stop. The state law clearly seeks to prevent anyone from aiding a suicide. So the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney's office was right to bring Maryland's first assisted suicide charge against a teen-ager who is accused of taking an active part in the death of his 15-year-old girlfriend.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2000
Opponents of a bill that would narrow Maryland's law banning assisted suicide told a House committee yesterday that proposed changes would make the law too weak. In a Judiciary Committee hearing, opponents said the proposed changes offered a way around the year-old law, and didn't limit it to the intended target of health professionals, such as Dr. Jack Kevorkian of Michigan and his suicide machine. Del. William H. Cole IV, a Baltimore Democrat, and two other delegates are sponsoring a bill to make the law apply only to adults.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
A Baltimore delegate annoyed with the move by Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee to charge a 16-year-old Crofton youth with violating Maryland's ban on assisted suicide is hoping to change the law to prevent prosecutors from using it against other juveniles. On Tuesday, the teen-ager, who police believe entered into a suicide pact with his girlfriend, became the first person charged with breaking the new law. The measure took effect Oct. 1. That has worried some delegates and senators, who had Michigan doctor Jack Kevorkian in mind a year ago when they made assisted suicide a felony punishable by up to a year in jail.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed legislation yesterday that would in effect overturn an Oregon law permitting physician-assisted suicides while giving doctors more leeway to prescribe narcotics to reduce suffering in seriously ill patients.The bill, which passed 271-156, sets national standards for easing pain in the seriously ill and effectively prevents states from adopting their own versions of the 5-year-old Oregon law, which enables terminally ill patients in pain to end their lives with the aid of a doctor.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Chicago Tribune, which was published Tuesday.IN ILLINOIS, you have to be 21 years old before you can get a tattoo without parental consent. In the Netherlands, social attitudes are a bit more permissive.Under a new law proposed by the Dutch government, a child as young as 12, without the permission of her parents, could do more than get a tattoo -- she would be allowed to get a physician's help in committing suicide.In the Netherlands, doctor-assisted suicide is technically against the law, but for the past decade, doctors who follow official guidelines have been assured that they won't be prosecuted.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening will sign a bill today prohibiting assisted suicide in Maryland, despite warnings from opponents that the measure will have a "chilling effect" on pain relief for dying patients.The governor said yesterday that he had rejected pleas to veto the measure, but announced vetoes of five other measures that passed the General Assembly this year.Vetoed bills include one that would have given the Public Service Commission authority to raise the salaries of key staff members -- legislation the governor had tried unsuccessfully to amend to give him two additional appointments to the powerful regulatory body.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Legislation making it a crime to assist a suicide passed the General Assembly yesterday. Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected to sign the bill and make Maryland the 38th state to explicitly criminalize the practice.The bill passed the Senate 27-20 after days of emotional debate in which opponents argued it would have a chilling effect on doctors' attempts to ease pain at the end of life. Supporters repeatedly referred to Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the Michigan doctor who was convicted last month of second-degree murder in the death of an ailing man who asked to die."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.