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By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2000
The 16-year-old Crofton boy charged with assisted suicide in the death of his girlfriend pleaded "not involved" yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, and his attorney asked the judge to dismiss the case, arguing that the law was never meant to apply in the case of a failed suicide pact between lovers. The request came during a two-hour hearing on charges that the boy helped Jennifer Garvey, 15, shoot herself in the head Oct. 18. He is the first person charged with violating Maryland's 1999 assisted suicide law and is also charged with possession of a handgun and reckless endangerment, all as a juvenile.
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NEWS
October 5, 2014
Bradley Williams makes a good point about the problems with legalizing assisted suicide, one of them being that people assisting a suicide may have their own agenda ( "The perils of assisted suicide," Oct. 2). Mr. Williams gives as an example a recent Montana case in which a man is accused of encouraging a teenage girl to kill herself in order to prevent her from testifying against him in a rape trial. I am a doctor in Oregon, one of the few states in which physician-assisted suicide is legal.
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NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
Legislation making it a crime to assist a suicide passed the General Assembly yesterday. Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected to sign the bill and make Maryland the 38th state to explicitly criminalize the practice.The bill passed the Senate 27-20 after days of emotional debate in which opponents argued it would have a chilling effect on doctors' attempts to ease pain at the end of life. Supporters repeatedly referred to Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the Michigan doctor who was convicted last month of second-degree murder in the death of an ailing man who asked to die."
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Alexa Fraser's recent commentary promotes the idea of legalizing physician-assisted suicide ( "Political candidates should debate the right to die," Sept. 28). The term "physician-assisted suicide" means that a physician provides the means or information to enable a patient to perform a life-ending act, such as through a lethal prescription. The premise of Ms. Fraser's commentary is that legalization of physician-assisted suicide will eliminate other types of suicides, such as those resulting from self-inflicted gunshot wounds.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
I dispute commentator Alexa Fraser's claim that assisted suicide is legal in Montana. ( "Political candidates should debate the right to die," Sept. 28), I am president of Montanans Against Assisted Suicide, and we are in litigation against the Montana Medical Examiners Board over the status of assisted suicide in our state . MAAS is also seeking to overturn Montana's Baxter case, which gives doctors who assist a suicide a potential defense to a charge of homicide. In Montana there was a recent case in which a man was charged with "aiding or soliciting" the suicide of a 16-year-old girl . He is accused of trying to prevent her from testifying against him in another matter by getting her to kill herself.
NEWS
By Lonny Shavelson | January 22, 1997
BERKELEY, Calif. -- Court cases usually involve winners and losers. But one point was not at issue as lawyers before the U.S. Supreme Court last week argued whether terminally ill patients have a ''right to die.'' Those who have been begging for better deaths deserve them.Whatever the justices decide, the court's judgment will work in favor of all people who will someday face death.Being forced to make their points in reasoned fashion to the court has given both sides of the physician-assisted-suicide debate new insight as to how patients are both treated and mistreated as they near death.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 30, 1997
BOSTON -- So there is no last right for the dying. No right to doctor-assisted suicide. Not in the Constitution. Not in the Supreme Court's view. Not yet.In a ruling as sober as its subject, all nine justices refused to accept the notion that assisted suicide was a fundamental liberty for the terminally ill. They rejected the argument that aid-in-dying embodied the ''right to determine the time and manner of one's death,'' or the ''liberty to choose how...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 18, 1993
DETROIT -- Dr. Jack Kevorkian got his wish yesterday when he became the first person charged under Michigan's new law banning assisted suicide, a felony that carries a penalty of up to four years in prison.Dr. Kevorkian, who has helped 17 ailing people kill themselves since 1990, has been pushing for this confrontation for two weeks, hoping for a trial in which he can focus even more attention on his cause and challenge the law in court, where he is confident he will be acquitted."I will continue helping suffering patients no matter what," the doctor said yesterday at a news conference.
NEWS
March 7, 2009
Animals are "put down" to humanely end their pain and suffering. Why do we show more compassion for animals than we do to our family members, friends and citizens of this state and nation who are suffering unendurable pain and who feel they can no longer go on ("2 accused of roles in suicide network," Feb. 27)? On what rational basis can the right to die with dignity be denied to those who are in great pain, who are debilitated or facing a devastating end-of-life illness? When will we be civilized enough as a nation to pass legislation in support of the individual's right to die when he or she has suffered enough and cannot endure anymore pain?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 30, 1999
BOSTON -- This is the question Jack Kevorkian posed at the very end of his fifth trial: "Just look at me. . . . Do you see a murderer?" He asked this as if murder were an image, not an action. As if the jury, which found him guilty Friday of second-degree murder, were just another focus group.But what do the rest of us see when we look at Kevorkian? A medical "hit man" in the words of the prosecutor, "with a bag of poison to do his job"? A Rosa Parks or Martin Luther King Jr., in Kevorkian's words, who put doctor-assisted death on the national agenda?
NEWS
April 21, 2014
Del. Heather R. Mizeur's call for legalized suicide for the terminally ill ( "Mizeur backs physician-assisted suicide," April 16) demonstrates incredibly poor judgment. As a senior, I have seen healthy seniors badgered or misled by relatives or significant others into making very bad financial and other decisions. The terminally ill are particularly vulnerable to such manipulation. Greedy heirs or those who are inconvenienced by a sick person can exert tremendous overt and covert psychological pressures to coerce the sick into legal suicide.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Del. Heather R. Mizeur promised to push for a law allowing physician-assisted suicide in Maryland if elected governor. "If terminally ill, mentally competent adults choose to end their life, they should be able to seek a life-ending dose of medicine from their physician," Mizeur said in a policy proposal released late Tuesday. Three states - Oregon, Washington, and Vermont - have similar policies, dubbed by advocates "Death with Dignity" laws. Mizeur, a Democrat from Montgomery County, outlined her call for legalization of doctor-assisted suicide along with ideas to help seniors as they retire, age, get sick and approach death.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
From a cluttered Baltimore apartment office, Dr. Lawrence Egbert says he has helped direct the deaths of nearly 300 people across the country. Some of his patients, as he calls them, are racked with cancer, paralyzed or staring down Alzheimer's. Others simply want to slip away on their own terms. Sometimes family members gather around the bedside to say goodbye; in other cases, their appointed "exit guides" lock the door behind them and make arrangements for someone to stumble across the body.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
Four members of an assisted-suicide group, including two Baltimore men, were indicted Tuesday on charges of helping a 58-year-old man with cancer kill himself, more than a year after they were arrested in the Georgia case. Dr. Lawrence D. Egbert, then a private physician with ties to the Johns Hopkins University, and Nicholas Alec Sheridan, then a part-time legislative aide to Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat, were arrested in Baltimore in February 2009. Ted Goodwin, then-president of Final Exit, and another Georgia member were also arrested.
NEWS
March 7, 2009
Animals are "put down" to humanely end their pain and suffering. Why do we show more compassion for animals than we do to our family members, friends and citizens of this state and nation who are suffering unendurable pain and who feel they can no longer go on ("2 accused of roles in suicide network," Feb. 27)? On what rational basis can the right to die with dignity be denied to those who are in great pain, who are debilitated or facing a devastating end-of-life illness? When will we be civilized enough as a nation to pass legislation in support of the individual's right to die when he or she has suffered enough and cannot endure anymore pain?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 2, 2007
COLDWATER, Mich. -- Jack Kevorkian, the former doctor and outspoken flamboyant advocate for assisted suicide, walked out of a prison yesterday after serving eight years for second-degree murder for his role in one death. Outside a state prison building, Kevorkian, who turned 79 last month, smiled and told reporters that leaving prison was "one of the high points of life" before being ushered away in a white van. His original prison sentence was 10 to 25 years. Kevorkian will be on parole for two years; one component of his parole was his promise that he would not participate in any future assisted suicides, Michigan prison officials said.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
Maryland doctors who deal with end-of-life issues say that controlling patients' pain or depression often provides relief to those who ask about the possibility of physician-assisted suicide. But several doctors said very few patients raise the issue. "I don't get a lot of requests. It isn't common," said Dr. Tim Keay, who is director of palliative care at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He regularly deals with patients who have terminal illnesses and will die in a matter of months or weeks.
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