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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
It's the time in life people spend years working and saving to reach. The time when they get to the age where they can stop working, tap into their 401(k) accounts, sell their homes and move into a retirement community. Finally, someone else can mow the lawn and fix the toilet when it breaks. Or maybe, they can't move around as much by themselves anymore and choose to live in an assisted-living center where they can get help with basic needs. But seniors are feeling the pain of the recession just like everyone else.
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NEWS
December 23, 2008
The Baltimore Sun's editorial "Tie-breaker" (Dec. 15) rightly notes the stalemate between the Roland Park community and the Baltimore Country Club on the Keswick Multi-Care Center's plan to build an assisted-living facility on land that now belongs to the country club. This stalemate is an opportunity for the city to take a leadership role in moving the project out of Roland Park and into another area in the city that is in need of redevelopment. There is no need to destroy green space to build such a center when there are so many sites throughout the city, including near Roland Park, that are in need of redevelopment.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
Plans for an assisted-living facility along a scenic stretch of General's Highway in Crownsville appear dead after three key members of the Anne Arundel County Council indicated they would oppose granting sewer access to the site. On Monday night, the council first narrowly opposed a change to a "housekeeping" zoning bill that would have blocked the 160-unit assisted-living center on seven acres, but the victory for Shelter Development of Baltimore was short-lived. Though acknowledging the need for more housing for the county's aging population, three of the lawmakers who voted against Democratic Councilman Josh Cohen's amendment - Republicans Ronald C. Dillon Jr. and Edward R. Reilly and Democrat Daryl D. Jones - said they will block the required sewer hookups.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | November 4, 2007
Residents frustrated about traffic snarls along a scenic bypass into Annapolis are gearing up for a fight to protect their rural road from what they believe will be the first step to rampant development. General's Highway, a two-lane road that leads from Crownsville into Annapolis, was named to commemorate George Washington's 1783 trip to the city to resign his commission as head of the Continental Army. Over the years, the former Colonial post road has become another clogged artery to the state capital.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | September 30, 2007
We are in so much trouble, boomers. I know, I can hear the Gen-XYZs saying, "Please, not another baby boomer whining about getting older." Well, bear with me here. Our pain might be your pain one day. I've just come back from visiting my mom. She lives in a large, Baltimore-area retirement community. She'll turn 95 this fall, but she still steams through the halls behind her walker as if the place were on fire. She calls it "playing golf," and walks the "links" at least three times a day. But she is struggling with vascular dementia (hardly anybody hits 90 without slipping a cog)
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has suspended the license of an assisted-living facility in Baltimore's Hillen community, according to an order issued yesterday by department Secretary John M. Colmers. Four residents of Ann's Loving Care in the 1500 block of Northgate Road were transferred to other licensed facilities, with help from city police, Adult Protective Services and the state Department of Aging, said Wendy Kronmiller, director for the Office of Health Care Quality.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
About three-quarters of Maryland's roughly 1,500 licensed "assisted-living facilities" for the elderly went unchecked by regulators despite a state law that requires annual inspections, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. "It is something Maryland should be ashamed of," said Kate Ricks, chairwoman of Voices for Quality Care, a nonprofit group that advocates for the elderly. She said she is appalled that Maryland did only a fraction of the required annual inspections during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2006.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Special to The Sun | February 25, 2007
At Ginger Cove in Annapolis, independent retirees take classes, swim in the indoor pool and play croquet. Those needing more care are guided to private apartments in the assisted-living center, where staff members can help with residents' grooming and other daily tasks. Beyond that, the 61-bed health center provides full-time nursing care. Ginger Cove bills itself as "the ideal life-care retirement community," where retirees can enjoy the rest of their years without the burden and worry of moving around and finding appropriate care.
NEWS
By Josh Dombroskie and Josh Dombroskie,sun reporter | February 23, 2007
Corridors are closed off and workers in hardhats scurry about, but the folks who live at Pickersgill Retirement Community don't seem to be bothered. "Getting to the meeting room is a little inconvenient, but that is a temporary thing," said Sanford Disney, a resident of the Towson retirement community. "It's exercise, and it keeps you walking." Pickersgill, which describes itself as Maryland's oldest retirement community and the second-oldest in the nation, is in the midst of an extensive renovation.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | November 21, 2006
Erickson Retirement Communities plans to build a $20 million building in the research park at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to house its information technology services, charitable foundation and Retirement Living TV, which is nationally broadcast via Comcast and DirecTV. The Catonsville-based developer of independent and assisted living communities will employ 60 full-time professionals in addition to about a dozen student interns from UMBC each year. The 110,000-square-foot building should be completed in 2008 and would be the fifth in the 41-acre research park, which is on the university's Catonsville campus.
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