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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
Cheryl and Dale Poletynski's large new Rosedale home is a monument to communal living -- and a refuge for three frail tenants who otherwise would be hard pressed to find a place offering assisted living on their meager incomes.The couple is among a handful of families taking part in a landmark -- but little-known -- Baltimore County program called Adult Foster Care, the first of its kind in Maryland and now celebrating its 25th anniversary.The $50,000-a-year county program, the model for the state's much larger $5.3 million Project Home, pays families up to $1,000 a month to take low-income and elderly disabled people into their homes.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
The number of seniors using federal programs to get reverse mortgages on their homes has quadrupled in the last 10 years, saving thousands of cash-strapped older Americans from the loss of their residences, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Andrew M. Cuomo told a Baltimore convention on senior housing yesterday. Because of the program's success, Cuomo said he wants to expand the HUD Housing Security Plan for Older Americans introduced by the Clinton administration last year.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | November 4, 2007
Residents frustrated about traffic snarls along a scenic bypass into Annapolis are gearing up for a fight to protect their rural road from what they believe will be the first step to rampant development. General's Highway, a two-lane road that leads from Crownsville into Annapolis, was named to commemorate George Washington's 1783 trip to the city to resign his commission as head of the Continental Army. Over the years, the former Colonial post road has become another clogged artery to the state capital.
BUSINESS
By KIM CLARK and KIM CLARK,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Manor Care Inc. announced yesterday that it had completed the purchase of 11 retirement homes and skilled nursing facilities, making it the third-largest provider of assisted living in the country.The Silver Spring-based company said it paid competitor Beverly Enterprises Inc. $74.3 million for facilities in California, Illinois, Ohio and Florida.With the acquisition of the six new retirement centers and five nursing homes, Manor Care said it now owns a total of 193 facilities with 25,532 beds in 28 states.
NEWS
October 22, 2003
Senior services group names board members The Anne Arundel Senior Services Provider Group has announced the results of its recent board of directors election. Stuart Neff, a financial adviser who lives in Glen Burnie, has been re-elected as board chairman for the county services group. Other officials are Megan Hoffman of Sunrise Assisted Living in Severna Park, president; Heather Zeiss of Deerfield Senior Day Centers, vice president; and David Dickens of Home Instead Senior Care, secretary.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
Misty Ridge Assisted Living Facility Location: Terrapin Drive, east of Klees Mill Road in Sykesville Owner: Abar Partnership, Sykesville Developer: Same Engineer: Maryland Land Design, Hanover, Pa. Zoning: Agricultural Acreage: 4.3 acres Description: A proposed 16-bed assisted living home for residents 55 years and older. Living units will each have a single bedroom and bath and will be located in an addition to an existing brick home on the property. The house will be renovated to serve as the kitchen, dining and living rooms and library.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
A Fairfax, Va., developer will start building a 138-suite elderly housing center in Severna Park in March.Sunrise Assisted Living Inc. recently received county approval for a 59-unit independent living center and a 79-unit assisted living center on 10.01 acres at Ritchie Highway and Cypress Creek Road in Severna Park.William Shields, vice president of development for Sunrise, said construction should take about a year."There's always a need for affordable housing for the elderly," Mr. Shields said.
NEWS
By Mary Moorhead and Mary Moorhead,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 29, 1999
The Internet is filled with information on, about and for seniors. Here is a list of my favorite sites. For those of you who do not have a computer at home, try your local public library for Internet access.Alzheimer's disease* www.alz.org/ links you to the national Alzheimer's Association page. You can locate the association nearest you, programs, publications and the latest research. There is an excellent step-by-step approach to obtaining a thorough medical assessment of this difficult disease.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
Baltimore County has tentatively agreed to sell a 70-year-old former school building in Ruxton to a firm that wants to replace it with an assisted-living home for the elderly.The $525,000 sale of the old Woodvale School at 8101 Bellona Ave. just north of Joppa Road would have to be approved by the Baltimore County Council. That vote could come March 3.If the deal becomes final, Manor Care, a national nursing home chain, plans to demolish the two-story brick building and erect a one-story, assisted-living home on the 3.3-acre site, said Robert M. Boras, director of development at the firm's Gaithersburg headquarters.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | November 30, 2003
Attention, baby boomers: If you've been hoping to inherit a pot of money after your parents pass on, you might want to rethink it. Boomers aren't going to be inheriting as much as they think, said Laurence J. Kotlikoff, an economics professor at Boston University, who co-wrote a study in 2000 on boomers' inheritance prospects. He stands by his conclusions. For one thing, boomers can expect to receive 15 percent to 20 percent less in their inheritance than they would have gotten three years ago because of the stock market meltdown, he said.
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