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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Moving to protect the state's burgeoning elderly population, Maryland officials are about to overhaul the way they monitor thousands of assisted-living homes, the fastest growing type of long-term care.The plan, unveiled last week, is intended to sew up gaping loopholes and replace a patchwork of contradictory regulations that the state has used up to now."In some places we've gone in and found very, very ill people, and we've had to intervene or move them to a hospital," said Carol Benner, director of licensing and certification for the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Moving to protect the state's burgeoning elderly population, Maryland officials are about to overhaul the way they monitor thousands of assisted-living homes, the fastest growing type of long-term care.The plan, unveiled last week, is intended to sew up gaping loopholes and replace a patchwork of contradictory regulations that the state has used up to now."In some places we've gone in and found very, very ill people, and we've had to intervene or move them to a hospital," said Carol Benner, director of licensing and certification for the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1998
Mid-Atlantic Healthcare Partners Inc., a Timonium start-up, announced yesterday that it had completed the acquisition of Covenant Care Corp., which operates eight assisted-living facilities in Western Pennsylvania.Terms were not disclosed.This is the first step toward making Mid-Atlantic "a leading regional provider" of assisted living, skilled nursing and related services, said Daniel A. Hirschfeld, president and chief executive officer.The company was formed last year by Hirschfeld and David Yungmann, each of whom have worked for several long-term care providers.
NEWS
October 22, 1996
CONFUSION ABOUNDS over whether a public hearing is required for any assisted living project in Anne Arundel County. A new ordinance now regulates these facilities in the county, yet officials have determined that no public hearing is necessary for developers of a 98-bed facility in Pasadena. Despite what residents may think, the county is, indeed, following its new law.The necessity of a public hearing hinges on whether the project is to be built on residential or commercial land. Under the terms of the ordinance sponsored by Councilman William C. Mulford II, hearings are required for nursing homes and assisted living facilities of 16 beds or more that are to be built on land zoned as residential.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2000
Ruth Martin, a former nursing home worker, saw the need for alternative care for the elderly long before assisted-living homes began proliferating in Carroll County. "I felt there had to be some kind of alternative for people," said Martin, who began operating an assisted-living facility, Country Companions, about five years ago. "There were so many people in nursing homes that didn't require nursing care. This kind of care was somewhat unheard of." A decade ago, about 20 assisted-living facilities operated in the county, compared with 50 today.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1999
Continuing its strategy of building a strong foothold region by region, Towson-based Hallmark Senior Communities LLC said yesterday that it has acquired five more assisted-living facilities, bringing its total to 15 and increasing its capacity by 57 percent.Two of the newly acquired facilities are in Hazelton, Pa.; one is in Altoona, Pa.; one is in Lebanon County, Pa.; and the fifth is in central New Jersey.The acquisitions, which together cost $22 million, bring the company's holdings to 14 facilities in Pennsylvania and one in New Jersey with a residential capacity of 1,760 and boost the privately held company's annual revenue to $19 million, said Daniel A. Hirschfeld, chairman, chief executive and president.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
A Howard County nursing home operator hopes to start design work next month on the first phase of a 199-unit assisted-living apartment complex in Taneytown. But a lawsuit is delaying development of a planned adjoining nursing home.In the suit, Pleasant View Nursing Home of Mount Airy charges that a state regulatory agency improperly allowed Lorien Home Health Care Inc. of Ellicott City to divide its allocation of 125 beds for a Taneytown nursing home with a Mount Airy site. The Maryland Health Resources Planning Commission authorized Lorien in July 1997 to split the allocation between a 63-bed nursing home in Taneytown and a 62-bed home in Mount Airy.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
As the owner of a local moving company, James C. Prodoehl has visited many of Maryland's assisted-living facilities, helping countless seniors settle in.More often than not, he was disappointed by what he saw."The rooms are small, and most aren't private," Prodoehl said.Prodoehl, 35, believes he's created the ideal alternative to such places with Country Care Manor, a three-story house that he's converted into a 13-bed home for seniors.Open house todayThe building, in the 2400 block of Baltimore Blvd.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
A two-year community fight over a large, unapproved expansion of a Catonsville assisted living home took a dramatic turn yesterday when the Baltimore County Board of Appeals declared the operation illegal.The unanimous decision reverses a zoning commissioner's ruling in July that the Parkside Assisted Living home at 303 N. Rolling Road is entitled to zoning variances and a special exception that would legitimize the completed four-level, $700,000 addition.Board Chairman Robert O. Schuetz persuaded his reluctant board colleagues, Harry E. Buchmeister and Charles L. Marks, to go along with his view that the addition was improperly added to the large home two years ago.The work was done without proper permits and increased the home's size by 35 percent, making it so incompatible with the neighborhood that Marks said it "looks like a small hotel."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
As it gears up to develop 200 assisted living complexes in the next five years, Manor Care Inc. of Gaithersburg announced yesterday that it will split itself into two companies -- one to build facilities and another to operate them.The move allows Manor Care to expand rapidly in the growing assisted living market -- it opened only half a dozen such facilities in the past fiscal year and expects 15 to 20 this year -- without damaging its track record for profitability.The problem with rapid development of new facilities is that there are "significant start-up losses, and that hits the bottom line," said Stewart Bainum Jr., chairman of Manor Care, who will be chairman of both new companies.
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