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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Wells Fargo is offering eligible homebuyers in Baltimore a $15,000 down-payment assistance loan that is fully forgivable if the purchaser lives in the home for five years - part of a legal settlement over alleged discriminatory lending practices by the bank. “2013 promises to be the best year ever to buy a home in Baltimore city,” said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake at a new conference Monday morning in City Hall to announce the initiative. The new $4.5 million program, a large enough pot of money to help individuals purchase 300 homes, adds to an already robust set of incentives to buy a home in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1997
A federal emergency feed bill and a crop assistance program could bring relief to farmers suffering from the worst drought to hit Western Maryland farms in three decades.Congress has authorized a cost-share program that would have the government paying for 30 percent of the feed purchased this winter."Congress has given [Agriculture] Secretary [Dan] Glickman the authority; the resources are available," Republican 6th District Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, the bill's sponsor, said. "The ball is in his court."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Hurricane Sandy blew the waters of the Little Annemessex River into living rooms across the Somerset County town of Crisfield one year ago, displacing hundreds of families, some still homeless a year later. Their numbers began to shrink Monday when charity workers dedicated the first two houses to be rebuilt since the storm. Many others have been repaired. Across the state, thousands in Garrett County endured days without electricity after Sandy dumped more than two feet of unusually wet, heavy snow, and emergency officials managed rescue efforts from a courthouse basement with a slow Internet connection.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 13, 1991
As energy prices continue to rise, Michael, a 38-year-old Carroll County mason, awaits word on his application for a state grant to help pay his home heating costs."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 3, 1992
Thanks to a new infusion of federal money, patients who cannot afford the high cost of AIDS medications now are eligible for more assistance under Maryland's prescription drug program.Emergency regulations enacted late last month have widened the array of drugs covered by the Maryland AIDS Drug Assistance Program from three to 18.The list now includes drugs used to fight most of the major AIDS-related illnesses including tuberculosis, yeast infections and a serious affliction that blinds some patients.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 3, 1992
Thanks to a new infusion of federal money, patients who cannot afford the high cost of AIDS medications now are eligible for more assistance under Maryland's prescription drug program.Emergency regulations enacted late last month have widened the array of drugs covered by the Maryland AIDS Drug Assistance Program from three to 18. The list now includes drugs used to fight most of the major AIDS-related illnesses including tuberculosis, yeast infections and a serious affliction that blinds some patients.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | December 4, 1991
For county social service workers, Susan's situation is all too familiar.Susan is 22 and has two children. Her husband left her and she quit her secretarial job because she could no longer afford day care for her children.She moved in with a relative and began receiving $377 a month through the state Aid for Families with Dependent Children program. Susan uses the money to feed and clothe her family and for other expenses.However the AFDC grants, which go out to about 637 Carroll families like Susan's, would be reduced if a proposed package cuts in state welfare programs is approved.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 19, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The Schaefer administration has backed off its decision to cap the state-funded program that provides a safety net for the disabled poor.At the request of Charles L. Benton Jr., secretary of budget and fiscal planning, members of a legislative oversight committee agreed to postpone consideration of cuts in this year's state-funded general public assistance program for at least two weeks.That delay will give administration officials and legislative leaders time to find alternative budget cuts to offset the program's projected $10 million deficit, said Delegate Charles J. Ryan Jr., chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, who made the request with Mr. Benton.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
From: Dennis StevensPresident,Airport Coordinating TeamThe Airport Coordinating Team (ACT) understands that the Federal Aviation Administration has granted to the Maryland Aviation Administration (MAA) more funding to relocate homeowners in the higher noise exposure areas around BWI Airport and also to sound attenuate homes.ACT generally understands the reasonsfor a homeowner wanting sound-attenuation assistance. However, we would like to make perspective participants in the Homeowner's Noise Assistance Program aware of a caveat about this program.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A federal grand jury indicted 10 Baltimore business owners or operators on charges of stealing nearly $7 million from food assistance programs by agreeing to debit cash for beneficiaries without selling food - then keeping a cut of the proceeds. The owner of a corner grocery in West Baltimore called "Second Obama Express" is accused of obtaining more than $2 million in payments for food sales that never occurred, a practice that authorities call "food stamp trafficking. " Eight others are accused of taking between $348,000 and $1.4 million.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Wells Fargo is offering eligible homebuyers in Baltimore a $15,000 down-payment assistance loan that is fully forgivable if the purchaser lives in the home for five years - part of a legal settlement over alleged discriminatory lending practices by the bank. “2013 promises to be the best year ever to buy a home in Baltimore city,” said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake at a new conference Monday morning in City Hall to announce the initiative. The new $4.5 million program, a large enough pot of money to help individuals purchase 300 homes, adds to an already robust set of incentives to buy a home in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Suzanne W. Reynolds, a psychotherapist and management consultant, died Sept. 21 of pancreatic cancer at her son's Ruxton home. She was 70. The daughter of a career Army officer and a homemaker, Suzanne Weston Reynolds was born in Cumberland and raised in Korea, Hawaii, Tennessee, Maryland and Virginia. After graduating from Annandale High School in Annandale, Va., in 1960, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1964 from George Washington University, where she also earned a master's degree.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Laid-off Sparrows Point steelworkers will have access to federal aid for retraining and other benefits, the state said Tuesday. The U.S. Department of Labor approved the help through the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program. The steel mill is owned by RG Steel LLC, which filed for bankruptcy protection in May. RG Steel workers and some contractors who have already been laid off — or who are let go between now and February — are potentially eligible for the help, aimed at Americans who lose their jobs as a result of foreign trade.
NEWS
By Kelsi Loos, Capital News Service special report | February 23, 2012
Costs for Carroll County families have risen more quickly than wages over the past decade, making self-sufficiency harder to achieve, according to a new study. A Carroll County family of one adult, a preschooler and a school-aged child needs $58,463 a year to cover basic costs, including housing, child care, food, transportation, health care and taxes, the study, titled the Self-Sufficiency Standard for Maryland, found. The standard was created by researchers at the University of Washington School of Social Work, in cooperation with the Maryland Community Action Partnership.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Nearly 5,000 Howard County residents benefited from energy assistance funds last year, but because federal funding is expected to drop, a nonprofit group says it will struggle to provide help. "The question is, how significant is the cut going to be and when is that decision going to be made?" said Bita Dayhoff, president of the Community Action Council of Howard County, who spoke before members of the county's Annapolis delegation Wednesday at the Association of Community Services meeting in Columbia.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
When her younger brother was murdered last month, Carol Iturralde didn't know where to turn.Not only did the Aberdeen woman have to cope with the emotional pain of her brother's death, she also had to find a way to pay his funeral expenses.That's when Ms. Iturralde received a telephone call from representatives of the county Victim and Witness Assistance Program, a year-old effort by county police departments and government agencies to help in the aftermath of crime."These people really pulled me through," said Ms. Iturralde, 43. "When you have someone to step in, it helps out. . . . I couldn't have done what they have done."
NEWS
By Don Terry and Don Terry,New York Times News Service | October 7, 1991
DETROIT -- For Ruth Williams, a middle-aged grandmother who says she has asthma, high-blood pressure and phlebitis, the welfare check for $87.50 she received twice a month from the state of Michigan "was like a life raft.""I'm poor, very poor," she said. "The check wasn't much, but it gave me a chance to feel like a human being."On Tuesday, the checks stopped coming.Faced with a budget deficit and hoping to end "welfare dependency," the state Legislature eliminated the general assistance welfare program for more than 80,000 adults who are so poor that they can typically have no more than a car worth $1,500.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A string of terrible luck brought Deborah Goldring to the brink of foreclosure. Her husband died. All their savings were exhausted paying down bills from his long illness. Then she lost her job. But just as the Baltimore woman's lender notified her that her time had nearly run out, a new federally funded program was launched to help homeowners like her. Now Goldring is about to close on a no-interest loan that will allow her to catch up on her mortgage and that will cover a large chunk of her monthly payments while she looks for work.
NEWS
March 12, 2011
In addition to the reductions cited in The Sun's article on the effects of federal budget cuts to Maryland families ("Federal cuts loom in Md. " March 6), the $2.5 Billion in proposed cuts to the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) means a threat to the well-being of hundreds of thousands of Marylanders. The Fuel Fund of Maryland is supported by individual donations, corporate and foundation grants and local businesses. We work through a network of agencies state-wide to assist Maryland's most vulnerable people.
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