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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
Home values in Maryland communities reassessed by the state this year have fallen an average of 17 percent since 2008, a sizable drop but smaller than in the last two rounds of property evaluations. Nine out of 10 residential properties that were reassessed lost value, the state Department of Assessments and Taxation said Tuesday. Some homes were more valuable because their owners renovated. But assessors say they're seeing signs of stabilization in some neighborhoods - a new trend.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
City Councilman William H. Cole IV said Wednesday evening that his office told state assessors several years ago that they had mistakenly valued a large Federal Hill home as if it were a fraction of its true size. And Cole said others in the neighborhood had complained as well, yet the error was not fixed. "For whatever reason, this house has slipped through the cracks nine different ways to Sunday," Cole said during a hearing at City Hall. Assessment officials could not explain why the tips went unheeded.
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | January 17, 1991
As homeowners rail against rising property tax assessments, county tax rebels and private appraisers are questioning the qualifications of state assessors.They want to know why state assessors are exempt from a new law that requires private appraisers to be licensed by astate real estate appraisal commission."Why doesn't the state want its people to qualify?" asked one veteran Annapolis appraiser, who asked not to be named. "Who says those of us who are not state assessors are not as qualified as they are?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
The imposing three-story home on the 200 block of E. Montgomery St.stands out from its more modest Federal Hill neighbors. The edifice, with 15 front windows and a gated driveway, is noticeably bigger and no doubt much pricier. But you couldn't tell by looking at the property tax bill. The government values the house — actually three Baltimore rowhouses combined into one — at $552,000, or close to what it values nearby two-story homes with less than half the square footage.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
City Councilman William H. Cole IV said Wednesday evening that his office told state assessors several years ago that they had mistakenly valued a large Federal Hill home as if it were a fraction of its true size. And Cole said others in the neighborhood had complained as well, yet the error was not fixed. "For whatever reason, this house has slipped through the cracks nine different ways to Sunday," Cole said during a hearing at City Hall. Assessment officials could not explain why the tips went unheeded.
NEWS
By Joel McCord | December 23, 1990
Jack Borchers was livid. There was "no way this frame hunka crap" was worth nearly $92,000, he raved, pointing his thumb back over his shoulder toward his two-bedroom rancher on Rolling View Avenue in Fullerton."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Maryland homeowners will see property values plunge 22 percent on average in the latest round of state assessments — a record drop that won't necessarily translate into lower taxes. State assessors plan to announce the details today as they mail notices to the one-third of residential and commercial owners whose properties were reassessed, about 740,000 in all. Assessed values dropped on 95 percent of the residential properties compared with their last reassessment in late 2007, when home prices were just beginning to reverse after big increases.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | January 15, 2006
Last week in Federal Hill, more than 300 homeowners attended a meeting with state assessors to learn how to appeal their property assessments. It didn't take long to get heated. How is it possible that land values doubled in three years, one man complained. Another asked if assessors don't see inside homes, how can they fairly compare houses with no renovations against those that have secretly undergone major overhauls without the necessary permits? With tempers and frustration flaring, the meeting was abruptly called to a halt.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 9, 2005
As part of its accreditation process, the Baltimore County Police Department is inviting employees and the public to comment at an information session at 7 p.m. Monday at the Public Safety Building, 700 E. Joppa Road in Towson. The session will be led by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc., an international program that will conduct an onsite assessment of the department Sunday through Aug. 18. Comments will be limited to 10 minutes and must address the department's compliance with one or more of the commission's four standards: policy and procedures, administration, operations and support services.
NEWS
By DAVID ELLSWORTH BOYD | January 29, 1991
Property tax protest! It's on the minds of many people, some ofwhom may never have thought about it until various groups formed in Baltimore County.My group, Property Taxpayers United, started in January 1990 when central Baltimore County property owners were reassessed. Now new groups and extensions of our group are organizing in Dundalk, Essex, Perry Hall, Parkville and elsewhere. These are the homeowners from the Eastern part of the county who recently received their new assessments and tax bills.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
Home values in Maryland communities reassessed by the state this year have fallen an average of 17 percent since 2008, a sizable drop but smaller than in the last two rounds of property evaluations. Nine out of 10 residential properties that were reassessed lost value, the state Department of Assessments and Taxation said Tuesday. Some homes were more valuable because their owners renovated. But assessors say they're seeing signs of stabilization in some neighborhoods - a new trend.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Maryland homeowners will see property values plunge 22 percent on average in the latest round of state assessments — a record drop that won't necessarily translate into lower taxes. State assessors plan to announce the details today as they mail notices to the one-third of residential and commercial owners whose properties were reassessed, about 740,000 in all. Assessed values dropped on 95 percent of the residential properties compared with their last reassessment in late 2007, when home prices were just beginning to reverse after big increases.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Howard Levenson's name is not a household word in Howard County, but there are thousands of county homeowners who probably wanted to make his acquaintance over the years. As Maryland's assessment supervisor for the county since 1991, and a state assessment official since 1974, he's the man in charge of those state notices that arrive just before New Year's Day and can make people's faces turn red. He has presided over a huge two-decade roller coaster of real estate values that has more than doubled home prices in Maryland's most prosperous county.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Charles R. "Chip" Watson Jr., a Howard County commercial assessor, died in his sleep June 19 at his Laurel home. He was 55. Born in Baltimore and raised in Woodlawn, Mr. Watson was a 1972 graduate of McDonogh School. He attended the University of Virginia and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from Salisbury University. For the past 25 years, he had been a commercial assessor with the Howard County Department of Assessments and Taxation. The former Columbia resident was an accomplished gourmet cook and enjoyed entertaining family and friends.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 15, 2008
Calvin Chin, a veteran Chinese community leader and retired tax assessor and restaurant co-owner, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Guilford resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised on Paca Street, he was the son of Chin Quon and Lee Young Ho, who were early Chinese settlers in Baltimore. As a young man, he worked in the family business, the old China Clipper Restaurant at Charles and Eager streets. He also assisted in other family enterprises, the China Tea Import Co. on Park Avenue and the old Palais D'or, a West Lexington street restaurant.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | January 15, 2006
Last week in Federal Hill, more than 300 homeowners attended a meeting with state assessors to learn how to appeal their property assessments. It didn't take long to get heated. How is it possible that land values doubled in three years, one man complained. Another asked if assessors don't see inside homes, how can they fairly compare houses with no renovations against those that have secretly undergone major overhauls without the necessary permits? With tempers and frustration flaring, the meeting was abruptly called to a halt.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | October 8, 1994
Developers of the HarborView condominium tower, part of a planned $600 million, harbor-front village on Key Highway, have reached a settlement with the state that lowers the property's assessed value by $24 million and resolves an earlier property tax dispute.HarborView Properties Development Co. has agreed to a state offer to reduce the value of land surrounding the high-rise from $26.4 million to $2.4 million. The action lowers HarborView's property tax bill by around $500,000 a year.But HarborView must still pay taxes on the state's original $18.9 million assessment of the 248-unit tower overlooking the Inner Harbor, said Owen Charles, of the state's Department of Assessments and Taxation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
The imposing three-story home on the 200 block of E. Montgomery St.stands out from its more modest Federal Hill neighbors. The edifice, with 15 front windows and a gated driveway, is noticeably bigger and no doubt much pricier. But you couldn't tell by looking at the property tax bill. The government values the house — actually three Baltimore rowhouses combined into one — at $552,000, or close to what it values nearby two-story homes with less than half the square footage.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 9, 2005
As part of its accreditation process, the Baltimore County Police Department is inviting employees and the public to comment at an information session at 7 p.m. Monday at the Public Safety Building, 700 E. Joppa Road in Towson. The session will be led by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc., an international program that will conduct an onsite assessment of the department Sunday through Aug. 18. Comments will be limited to 10 minutes and must address the department's compliance with one or more of the commission's four standards: policy and procedures, administration, operations and support services.
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