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By Phil Greenfield | July 2, 2000
LIKE MANY policies emanating from our Maryland Board of Education these days, the recent threat to pull the plug on the new High School Assessment Tests in protest over the governor's reluctance to pony up millions of dollars in additional funding proved to be nothing more than a bluff. Instead, in a "compromise" measure, the board voted to keep the new exit exams, but to postpone implementing them as requirements for graduation until 2007. To combat student apathy in the face of yet another seven years of tests that don't count a whit, comparative evaluation scores (not the raw numbers themselves)
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By Renee A. Foose | February 14, 2013
There has been much recent debate about Race to the Top (RTTT) and its efficacy in improving K-12 education. RTTT was a competitive federal grant that challenged states to pursue innovative reforms on a rapid timeline from 2010 through 2014. The reforms are designed to ensure that every student is prepared with the requisite skills to succeed in college or in a livable-wage career. Maryland, like other RTTT-winning states, is using its grant ($250 million) to fund a new curriculum and a controversial teacher evaluation model that incorporates student growth, as measured in part by state test results.
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NEWS
March 5, 2003
THE MARYLAND School Performance Assessment Program, whose "Mizpap" acronym became a household word from Oakland to Ocean City, is officially retired. It has been replaced this week by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), a six-hour battery of math and reading tests spread over four days in grades 3, 5 and 8 and reading only in grade 10. (Three more grades will be added later.) MSA begins a new era of school testing in Maryland, one that's scheduled to last a dozen years. Year one is crucial because scores on the tests given this week will form the basis on which schools are required to demonstrate "adequate yearly progress" through 2014.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
HOWARD COUNTY school officials have lured a Montgomery County administrator to serve as the director of student assessment and program evaluation. Theresa Alban, who holds a similar job as director of the Montgomery County school system's Department of Shared Accountability, will start April 1. Alban's appointment was approved by the school board last week. She replaces Leslie Wilson, a 14-year employee who is retiring. "It's the work that I love to do," Alban said. "I was fortunate to do it in Montgomery County and that I'm able to do it in Howard County."
NEWS
May 31, 1996
School, furniture store team up to improve scoresEthan Allen Interiors and West Friendship Elementary School have formed an educational partnership to help the students improve their scores on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP).As part of the partnership, the students participated in a week-long activity to design a bedroom suite for a dream house, using the mathematical, decision-making and writing skills required for the MSPAP.The students submitted their entries, and three were selected for publication in an ad in The Sun. Readers voted for the best design, and Ethan Allen awarded a $50 savings bond to the winning student.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
Most of the 40 people who attended a public forum on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program - or MSPAP - criticized the mandatory pupil testing, raising concerns about the lengthy testing, lack of individual scoring and secrecy surrounding the results. Billed as a Maryland Education Summit, the forum at Century High School in Eldersburg included most members of Carroll's State House delegation, who sponsored the event. A roster of educators and opponents of the program, which is designed to evaluate the education of elementary and middle school pupils, made up much of the group.
NEWS
By Eric J. Smith | August 28, 2002
AS EDUCATORS throughout Maryland anticipate the imminent announcement of the new state assessment program, I wonder how much the rest of the community is watching. I've met with hundreds of people since my arrival in Maryland several months ago, many of them members of the business community. I sensed that they recognize that the announcement of the successor to the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) is the most important news the Maryland business community will hear for a very long time.
NEWS
December 19, 1994
The accomplishments of Carroll County students in the most recent Maryland School Performance Report were excellent. As in previous years, the scores were among the state's highest -- a reflection of a larger trend in Maryland in which rapidly suburbanizing counties have seen their test scores rise impressively.More important, this year's scores showed considerable improvement, particularly among the third graders. As encouraging as they were, the results also showed that Carroll County's school system has plenty of room to grow.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Most members of Maryland's largest teachers union generally support the state's school performance assessment tests but say some changes are needed, a poll released yesterday shows.The survey of more than 400 members of the Maryland State Teachers Association found that 60 percent said they think the assessment program is improving the education of students in their schools.And 83 percent of the teachers said they think their schools are "on the right track" with the program, formally known as the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
In the world of education acronyms, there's MSPAP and then there's MSRAP and, if you're a new teacher, you might have trouble keeping track of the difference. Nearly 400 of Baltimore's freshest recruits arrived this week for that and other lessons as part of an optional monthlong training camp designed to prepare them for the classroom - and what could be one of the most anxious times of their professional lives. "I don't have the benefit of having an extensive background of education courses," said Eric Chancey, 24, a Morgan State University graduate who will teach special education at Calverton Middle School.
NEWS
By Gail Lynn Goldberg | November 5, 2003
IT IS a truism of assessment that what gets tested is what gets taught. Yet the recent decision to eliminate the Maryland Writing Test (MWT), coupled with the demise of the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) in 2002, means that at no point in the K-12 experience of students will their writing skill specifically be measured through a statewide, direct assessment. To be sure, students will be doing a great deal of writing on other tests. Both the Maryland School Assessment (MSA)
NEWS
March 5, 2003
THE MARYLAND School Performance Assessment Program, whose "Mizpap" acronym became a household word from Oakland to Ocean City, is officially retired. It has been replaced this week by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), a six-hour battery of math and reading tests spread over four days in grades 3, 5 and 8 and reading only in grade 10. (Three more grades will be added later.) MSA begins a new era of school testing in Maryland, one that's scheduled to last a dozen years. Year one is crucial because scores on the tests given this week will form the basis on which schools are required to demonstrate "adequate yearly progress" through 2014.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2002
For the second year in a row, Howard County elementary and middle school pupils scored lower than the previous year in state achievement exams, while two county schools that took new High School Assessment tests ranked among the highest in the state. Howard administrators were reluctant to make any assessments based on the scores released by the state yesterday, saying they have not had time to analyze the data - and the snow days yesterday and today have only made things worse. "It wouldn't be responsible of us to make any decisions in terms of instruction just yet until we find out what the patterns were across the state" said Kimberly Statham, the county's associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction.
NEWS
By Eric J. Smith | August 28, 2002
AS EDUCATORS throughout Maryland anticipate the imminent announcement of the new state assessment program, I wonder how much the rest of the community is watching. I've met with hundreds of people since my arrival in Maryland several months ago, many of them members of the business community. I sensed that they recognize that the announcement of the successor to the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) is the most important news the Maryland business community will hear for a very long time.
NEWS
March 30, 2002
STATE EDUCATION officials have always said MSPAP is all about accountability. The program's opponents have always said its purpose is indiscernible, because the test doesn't include simple, straightforward questions. Turns out they were both wrong. MSPAP is about cash. Federal dollars, to be specific. State education officials last week reversed an earlier decision to make the eighth-grade MSPAP test optional this year and announced instead that 16 counties will have a choice about the test, but the other eight jurisdictions will have to take it. Why?
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2002
Most of the 40 people who attended a public forum on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program - or MSPAP - criticized the mandatory pupil testing, raising concerns about the lengthy testing, lack of individual scoring and secrecy surrounding the results. Billed as a Maryland Education Summit, the forum at Century High School in Eldersburg included most members of Carroll's State House delegation, who sponsored the event. A roster of educators and opponents of the program, which is designed to evaluate the education of elementary and middle school pupils, made up much of the group.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 16, 1997
A group of teachers and administrators from around the state has selected an Anne Arundel County schools' method to train teachers as the model program in Maryland.The program trains teachers how to create and use classroom assignments similar to the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP) tests.The state tests are designed to measure not only what students know, but how well they apply the information.State education officials cited Anne Arundel County in December for continued improvement in scores.
NEWS
December 18, 2001
The Thornton Commission, a state task force created to reduce inequities among school systems, has overwhelmingly approved a plan calling on Maryland to boost school spending by $1.1 billion over the next five years and to distribute the bulk of that money to less affluent areas. Officials in Montgomery County, which spends much more per pupil than any other system, object to the plan, saying their county would be shortchanged. Here is a comparison of spending per pupil and Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP)
NEWS
December 18, 2001
The Thornton Commission, a state task force created to reduce inequities among school systems, has overwhelmingly approved a plan calling on Maryland to boost school spending by $1.1 billion over the next five years and to distribute the bulk of that money to less affluent areas. Officials in Montgomery County, which spends much more per pupil than any other system, object to the plan, saying their county would be shortchanged. Here is a comparison of spending per pupil and Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP)
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
As Howard County schools close their doors to students today for another summer, three elementary school staffs are likely to be celebrating just a little bit more than others. Northfield, Manor Woods and Longfellow elementary schools' staffs recently received word that they get to spend the next two months planning what to do with the money they've received from the state for rising test scores. The three schools were among 61 statewide recognized by the State Department of Education for continuing to do well on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams.
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