Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAssessment Cap
IN THE NEWS

Assessment Cap

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | October 6, 1991
County administrators and the County Council are debating whether toraise the property tax assessment cap from 6 percent to 10 percent as a way to offset $4 million in state aid cutbacks.If the property tax assessment cap is raised, it would generate $731,000 more in income for the county than last year, said John Scotten, deputy treasurer.Council members have mixed opinions on the proposal.PresidentJeffrey D. Wilson and Councilwoman Theresa M. Pierno, D-District C, said last week they support raising the property tax assessment to 10percent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
It's a rite of winter: Tax assessment notices hit Maryland mailboxes in December, and thousands of homeowners rush to file appeals within the 45-day window. Now, however, property appraisers from the state report a new phenomenon: a drove of challenges to assessments recorded a year or more ago. Two years ago, fewer than 900 "petitions for review" were filed. But with the slump in home values showing no sign of abating, more than 15,000 Maryland homeowners exercised their appeal rights last year.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | October 7, 1990
The County Council voted, 6-1, Tuesday to cap property tax assessments at 6 percent, a move that could cost the county a minimum of $938,000 in revenue in the 1993-1994 fiscal year.The county ordinance, which affects only owner-occupied houses, was passed as a result of a state law requiring all counties to cap increases in property tax assessments at 10 percent or less.The 6 percent cap was proposed Tuesday by Councilman John Schafer, D-District C.No citizens spoke at a public hearing Sept.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
Disregarding the recommendations of its budget advisory committee and chief financial officer, the Columbia Association board voted to reduce the assessment increase cap from 3 percent to 2.5 percent. The decision was made by the previous board during its April 24 meeting. A new board took over Thursday with two newly elected members joining. Former board Chairwoman Barbara Russell, who retired from the board last week and voted for the reduction, said the vote was a compromise because some members wanted to keep the rate at 3 percent while she and others advocated for 2 percent.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
The Anne Arundel County Council is scheduled to vote tonight on County Executive Robert R. Neall's plan to cap at 4 percent the property assessment increase on which homeowners can be taxed, a measure he says is necessary for homeowners to realize the sort of savings they expected when voting for a property tax cap last month.But its passage, as well as its effect, is far from certain.The bill would only affect assessments during the coming year, and would have to be re-adopted annually. But confusion over its effect has persuaded Council Chairman David G. Boschert to say he would most likely oppose the bill, preferring to stick with the relief offered by the recently approved tax cap.The tax cap limits the increase in property tax revenue the county can collect to the rate of inflation or 4.5 percent, whichever is less.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
Tax rebels in Anne Arundel County are threatening to challenge in court the county's limit on property assessment increases, a move that could threaten tax credits for more than a half million homeowners statewide.On Monday, the County Council adopted a 4 percent cap on annual assessment increases.But Robert C. Schaeffer, leader of the county's anti-tax group, complained that the assessment cap benefits only affluent homeowners whose properties increase in value more rapidly than others. Their assessments would be held artificially low, while the assessments of more moderately priced homes would hardly be affected.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
The Howard County Council approved a bill last night that would reduce the local property assessment cap from 5 percent to 4 percent in July 2007, despite a strongly worded last-minute veto threat from County Executive James N. Robey. The bill, suggested by western county Republican Charles C. Feaga and co-sponsored by two other members, passed on a 3-2 vote, one shy of the margin needed to override a veto. Robey's move was puzzling, said council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon, who said he first heard of it in a telephone message several hours before last night's voting session.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | November 6, 1991
Despite a growing deficit in the county budget, the County Council turned down $2 million Monday by voting, 4-1, to keep property tax assessment increases to 5 percent a year.By placing a 5 percent cap on assessments, the county will, in effect, be granting an extra $2 million in credits to property owners. Had there been no cap at all, growing assessments would have swelled revenue by $3 million with no increase in the property tax rate.County budget director Raymond S. Wacks told the councilthat about 41,800 of the roughly 49,300 households in the county will benefit from the 5 percent cap.State law requires counties to set an assessment cap at 10 percent or less.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
The Columbia Association board of directors agrees with Del. Shane E. Pendergrass that the association needs a 10 percent ceiling on rising property assessments, but it doesn't want the state to make CA impose one. Backsliding from its original position of supporting Pendergrass' effort to require the 10 percent cap, the board has decided it wants Pendergrass to change her legislation to allow - not force - the association to use a cap. In a 6-4 decision...
NEWS
December 2, 1990
The Bel Air Town Commissioners are expected to initiate plans tomorrow to limit tax assessment increases on residential properties to 10 percent a year.At their regular meeting at 7:30 p.m., the commissioners are expected to schedule a public hearing on the plan for Monday, Dec. 17, Town Administrator William N. McFaul said.The commissioners are expected to approve the assessment cap by the end of the year."(The cap) establishes a limit to the assessment of your property," McFaul said. "It's to protect the property owner."
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
County Executive James N. Robey's vow to veto a Republican-sponsored tax cut seems to defy the prevailing political pull in an election year -- especially for a Democrat running for state Senate. Robey's last-minute, strongly worded promise to kill the bill sponsored by western county Republican Charles C. Feaga is likely to stick because the measure was approved Monday night on a 3-2 County Council vote, one short of the four council votes required to override an executive veto. The bill -- which would cut from 5 percent to 4 percent the annual cap on how much a home's assessed value could rise -- would not take effect until July 2007 if signed into law. The measure would cost the county treasury $3.8 million a year while saving the owner of a median $450,000 home about $46 a year.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
The Howard County Council approved a bill last night that would reduce the local property assessment cap from 5 percent to 4 percent in July 2007, despite a strongly worded last-minute veto threat from County Executive James N. Robey. The bill, suggested by western county Republican Charles C. Feaga and co-sponsored by two other members, passed on a 3-2 vote, one shy of the margin needed to override a veto. Robey's move was puzzling, said council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon, who said he first heard of it in a telephone message several hours before last night's voting session.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
Three of Howard County's five council members are proposing to reduce the local residential assessment cap to 4 percent from 5 percent, the second property tax cut suggested this election year. The assessment cap idea comes from council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon, an Ellicott City Republican, Charles C. Feaga, a western county Republican, and David A. Rakes, an east Columbia Democrat. If approved, the legislation would save the owner of a median-priced, $450,000 home about $46 a year, budget officials said - but not until July 2007 when the change would take effect.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
When William "Billy" Kerr and his wife, Kerri, bought their 80-year-old bungalow on Anneslie Road near Towson this spring, property taxes were not a major concern. "When you're sitting there at the closing table, you don't question details," Billy Kerr said. Compared with the $356,500 price of their home - nearly double its last sale price in 1998 - the local taxes seemed "a relatively small amount." But that was before the Kerrs learned they owed Baltimore County $3,038.94 in taxes, while their next-door neighbors, Daniel and Mary "Grace" Bigelow, had a tax bill for $1,968.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
To counteract sharply rising state property tax assessments, the Columbia Association board of directors has lowered the cap on the association's revenue growth from assessment increases from 10 percent to 5 percent. For most residents, the lowered limits will cut by half the increase in the annual Columbia Association charge, which is based on property value. "This is what's fair for the citizens," said Miles Coffman, board member from Hickory Ridge village, who suggested the change.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Laura Cadiz and Larry Carson and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
Howard County residents would see higher taxes on new homes, a 10 percent annual cap on increases in Columbia's property charges and an expanded school board as a result of the General Assembly session that ended at midnight. The Senate unanimously approved the mandatory 10 percent ceiling on property assessments in Columbia on Saturday, granting financial relief to the planned community's residents. The excise tax passed the Senate the same day, 42-2. "I really feel terrific," said Del. Shane E. Pendergrass, a Howard County Democrat who drafted the assessment-cap bill.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | October 20, 1991
It seems a virtual certainty that the county's property tax assessment cap will be raised to 10 percent to boost revenue and offset statebudget cuts.If the cap is raised, Harford could collect at least$731,000 more in property taxes next year, said county Treasurer James M. Jewell. This year, the county collected $61.5 million in real property taxes, which represents 40 percent of the county's income, Jewell said.Three council members introduced a measure Tuesday raising the tax assessment cap to 10 percent from its current 6 percent, and a fourth council member says she favors the bill, making a majority vote onthe seven-member body likely.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 22, 1992
The County Council, on a 4-3 vote, last night adopted the 4 percent cap on property-tax assessment increases proposed by Executive Robert R. Neall.In proposing the cap, Mr. Neall said he was trying to provide homeowners with the lower tax bills they expected after voters approved a property tax cap last month.Although council members seemed bewildered by the numbers, percentages and charts, both promoting and arguing against the assessment cap, a majority -- council members George Bachman, Edward Middlebrooks, Carl Holland and Diane Evans -- agreed with Mr. Neall.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 8, 2004
A state Senate committee approved legislation yesterday that aims to provide financial relief to Columbia homeowners by imposing a 10 percent cap on rising property assessments in the planned community. The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee unanimously approved the bill, drafted by Del. Shane E. Pendergrass. It was not amended. House Bill No. 566 would limit the effect of rising state property tax assessments on the annual charge that the Columbia Association imposes on its property owners.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
Howard County's two Republican state senators want a bill that would impose a mandatory 10 percent ceiling on rising property assessments in Columbia to be voluntary instead. Sens. Sandra B. Schrader and Robert H. Kittleman believe the state should not dictate the Columbia Association's affairs. The senators are not planning to offer an amendment to the bill, they said. They are waiting to see what happens to it in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, which heard the bill Wednesday and has not scheduled a vote on it. "I'd hate to start running the Columbia Association from the state legislature," Kittleman said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.