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By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | May 1, 1994
25 Years Ago* Crownsville State Hospital contains the highest percentage of Negro patients of any state mental hospital, according to the Maryland Department of Mental Hygiene. Before desegregation in 1963, Crownsville was all-Negro and the other three state hospitals were all white. -- The Sun, May 1, 1969.* County Executive Joseph W. Alton, Jr. yesterday recommended a record county budget, a $3 property tax for each $100 of assessed valuation and a 50 percent "piggyback" income tax to finance it. -- The Sun, May 2, 1969.
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NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
Disregarding the recommendations of its budget advisory committee and chief financial officer, the Columbia Association board voted to reduce the assessment increase cap from 3 percent to 2.5 percent. The decision was made by the previous board during its April 24 meeting. A new board took over Thursday with two newly elected members joining. Former board Chairwoman Barbara Russell, who retired from the board last week and voted for the reduction, said the vote was a compromise because some members wanted to keep the rate at 3 percent while she and others advocated for 2 percent.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
The town of Hampstead anticipates revenues and expenditures of $735,706 for the 1993-1994 fiscal year, according to draft figures released yesterday by Town Manager John A. Riley.The draft budget estimate shows an increase of almost 9 percent over last year's budget of $675,110.Estimates of town property tax revenues are based on the constant-yield tax rate of 50 cents per $100 of assessed valuation. That is 3 cents lower than the 1992-1993 tax rate of 53 cents per $100 of assessed valuation.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael, For the first time ever in my experience [as an attorney], I have been consulted by a client regarding a lowering of the state assessment on three of her properties, one of which is her residence. These properties are in the 1800 block of Madison Ave., and were assessed down from $111,200, $102,720 and $85,200, respectively, to $75,000 each. This area borders on what is known as Bolton Hill, where rates are much higher. The owner feels this is a devaluation which will adversely affect the property values and market prices in her area, which many residents are attempting to upgrade, and is considering an appeal.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Hampstead officials plan to lower the town's property tax rate this year, and the council in nearby Manchester expects to maintain the current tax rate.The councils in both towns met Tuesday night to review working budget proposals in their respective jurisdictions for the 1995-1996 fiscal year.Hampstead may lower its tax rate from 47 cents per $100 assessed valuation, to 45 cents, officials said.The town can afford to decrease the tax rate because the same development that's crowding Hampstead's schools and backing up roads also is bringing in more revenue.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
The Board of Estimates approved a $2.08 billion budget for fiscal 1993 yesterday that doesn't raise taxes and requires city employees to go a second straight year without cost-of-living wage increases.The spending plan, which is virtually unchanged from the budget unveiled by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke last month, now goes to an eager City Council for review."There are a number of issues that we want to look at," said Council President Mary Pat Clarke. "We want to take a look at the tax rate and see if there are ways to honor our commitment to chip the nickels away."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
The Board of Estimates approved a $2.08 billion budget for fiscal 1993 yesterday that doesn't raise taxes and requires city employees to go a second straight year without cost-of-living wage increases.The spending plan, which is virtually unchanged from the budget unveiled by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke last month, now goes to an eager City Council for review."There are a number of issues that we want to look at," said Council President Mary Pat Clarke. "We want to take a look at the tax rate and see if there are ways to honor our commitment to chip the nickels away."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
The Baltimore City Council gave preliminary approval yesterday to a $2.08 billion budget for next year, leaving Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's spending proposal untouched.Thanks to increases in state aid, Baltimore's budget -- due a final vote today -- would beef up the police force and increase education spending without raising city taxes.But the plan means a second straight year without cost-of-living pay increases for the city's 26,000 employees."We have the budget balanced on the goodwill and sacrifice of all the city workers," said Council President Mary Pat Clarke.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,Sun reporter | May 4, 2008
Disregarding the recommendations of its budget advisory committee and chief financial officer, the Columbia Association board voted to reduce the assessment increase cap from 3 percent to 2.5 percent. The decision was made by the previous board during its April 24 meeting. A new board took over Thursday with two newly elected members joining. Former board Chairwoman Barbara Russell, who retired from the board last week and voted for the reduction, said the vote was a compromise because some members wanted to keep the rate at 3 percent while she and others advocated for 2 percent.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Saff Writer | May 25, 1995
The county commissioners are scheduled to vote today on whether to raise the piggyback income tax. And Carroll's most vocal anti-tax group has already given notice it won't go along with the plan, which would cost the average taxpayer $150 a year.The Carroll County Taxpayer's Association has presented Commissioner Donald I. Dell with a petition bearing the names of more than 5,000 people who oppose the tax increase."We don't believe that it's really necessary," said association member William Drumm.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and By Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
The Columbia Association ignored the advice of the state attorney general's office and might have violated Maryland law when it changed the way it computes property assessments, two state officials say. Contrary to what Columbia Council members seemed to think when they voted Dec. 21, a new state law does not require the association to assess property at 100 percent valuation rather than 50 percent, the officials said Friday. In fact, they said, state law might forbid it. The Truth in Taxation law, which went into effect Oct. 1, does not apply to the private homeowners association because it is not a municipal or county government, according to Assistant Attorney General Robert A. Zarnoch and Ronald W. Wineholt, director of the state Department of Assessments and Taxation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2000
Improving schools remains priority No. 1 for County Executive Janet S. Owens, but the budget she presented yesterday also boosts funding for public safety, preservation of agricultural lands and a new library in Odenton. For the second straight year, all county employees would get raises of varying amounts. "My commitment to education hasn't changed, but it is important we address everybody, and we have to do that with limited dollars," she said after her half-hour budget address to the County Council and community leaders.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | April 20, 1998
On the surface, some might see the four-way race for two seats on the Town Council as a case of "Old Mount Airy vs. New Mount Airy." Two incumbents are being challenged by two political newcomers.The candidates may have different platforms, but they agree that "old against new" is a divisive way to look at the race. The election will be held May 4."We need to blend these new people and old people together. We need to make room for all of them," said Roger Rich, one of the challengers and chairman of the Mount Airy Pro-Active Committee, a citizens group working to obtain a community recreation center and a local high school.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
So your property assessment notice came mixed in with the late holiday cards, but it didn't leave you with a warm, holiday glow. The state of Maryland says your house is worth more than you think it's worth, and the increase will be reflected in your tax bill in July.Property owners who disagree strongly enough with an assessment to formally dispute it will likely number about 30,000 this year, state officials are predicting.Still, the estimated market value used to calculate property taxes won't increase or will increase only slightly for most Marylanders, said Ronald W. Wineholt, who was appointed director of the state Department of Assessments and Taxation in February.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Saff Writer | May 25, 1995
The county commissioners are scheduled to vote today on whether to raise the piggyback income tax. And Carroll's most vocal anti-tax group has already given notice it won't go along with the plan, which would cost the average taxpayer $150 a year.The Carroll County Taxpayer's Association has presented Commissioner Donald I. Dell with a petition bearing the names of more than 5,000 people who oppose the tax increase."We don't believe that it's really necessary," said association member William Drumm.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Hampstead officials plan to lower the town's property tax rate this year, and the council in nearby Manchester expects to maintain the current tax rate.The councils in both towns met Tuesday night to review working budget proposals in their respective jurisdictions for the 1995-1996 fiscal year.Hampstead may lower its tax rate from 47 cents per $100 assessed valuation, to 45 cents, officials said.The town can afford to decrease the tax rate because the same development that's crowding Hampstead's schools and backing up roads also is bringing in more revenue.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and By Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
The Columbia Association ignored the advice of the state attorney general's office and might have violated Maryland law when it changed the way it computes property assessments, two state officials say. Contrary to what Columbia Council members seemed to think when they voted Dec. 21, a new state law does not require the association to assess property at 100 percent valuation rather than 50 percent, the officials said Friday. In fact, they said, state law might forbid it. The Truth in Taxation law, which went into effect Oct. 1, does not apply to the private homeowners association because it is not a municipal or county government, according to Assistant Attorney General Robert A. Zarnoch and Ronald W. Wineholt, director of the state Department of Assessments and Taxation.
NEWS
March 9, 1994
Earned IncomeIn his March 1 letter, the Rev. Ed Heim is upset about recent recommendations to stop giving public assistance increases to poor women when they have another child.He asks for a justification and says, "The rest of society fully expects increased tax deductions and increased take-home pay after filing a new W-2 form to support their new family member."On behalf of "the rest of society," I would like to set the record straight. Yes, we expect increased tax deductions to support new family members.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | May 1, 1994
25 Years Ago* Crownsville State Hospital contains the highest percentage of Negro patients of any state mental hospital, according to the Maryland Department of Mental Hygiene. Before desegregation in 1963, Crownsville was all-Negro and the other three state hospitals were all white. -- The Sun, May 1, 1969.* County Executive Joseph W. Alton, Jr. yesterday recommended a record county budget, a $3 property tax for each $100 of assessed valuation and a 50 percent "piggyback" income tax to finance it. -- The Sun, May 2, 1969.
NEWS
March 9, 1994
Earned IncomeIn his March 1 letter, the Rev. Ed Heim is upset about recent recommendations to stop giving public assistance increases to poor women when they have another child.He asks for a justification and says, "The rest of society fully expects increased tax deductions and increased take-home pay after filing a new W-2 form to support their new family member."On behalf of "the rest of society," I would like to set the record straight. Yes, we expect increased tax deductions to support new family members.
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