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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1997
An assistant plant manager at General Motors Corp.'s Fort Wayne, Ind., operation has been named manager of the company's van assembly plant in Baltimore. David C. Prange, 41, succeeds Robert R. Rieman, who held that post since 1989.Prange yesterday was said to be moving to Baltimore and could not be reached for comment. GM said he expects to be on the job next week.Prange joined the company in 1978 as a salaried employee-in-training with the Chevrolet Motor Division, vehicle body component stamping plant in Indianapolis.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Maryland is in the running for a data storage center with its own sizable power plant, a project planned for the University of Delaware until officials there spiked it amid an uproar over its scale and potential effect on the community. The Data Centers LLC said it's looking in Cecil County and elsewhere in Maryland as well as in Delaware and five other states. The company, which goes by TDC, eventually hopes to build two to three of the projects a year. Now, though, TDC is hunting for land for its inaugural project — which has proved harder to launch than the Pennsylvania firm anticipated.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
Ann K. Crane, who went to the wrong place in Dundalk when applying for a job and ended up staying there anyway for nearly a quarter of a century, died Wednesday from heart failure at Oak Crest Village. She was 93. The daughter of immigrant Lithuanian parents, the former Ann Kwedar was born in Baltimore and raised near the corner of Lombard and Pine streets, where her mother and father owned and operated a grocery store and restaurant. "As a small child, she only spoke Lithuanian, and the kids used to make fun of her in school when she was asked to solve a math problem and gave the answer in Lithuanian," said a niece, Fran Burch of Kill Devil Hill, N.C. "She told of being taught to read English by an African-American woman tenant, reading newspapers in a back room," recalled Ms. Burch.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
Ann K. Crane, who went to the wrong place in Dundalk when applying for a job and ended up staying there anyway for nearly a quarter of a century, died Wednesday from heart failure at Oak Crest Village. She was 93. The daughter of immigrant Lithuanian parents, the former Ann Kwedar was born in Baltimore and raised near the corner of Lombard and Pine streets, where her mother and father owned and operated a grocery store and restaurant. "As a small child, she only spoke Lithuanian, and the kids used to make fun of her in school when she was asked to solve a math problem and gave the answer in Lithuanian," said a niece, Fran Burch of Kill Devil Hill, N.C. "She told of being taught to read English by an African-American woman tenant, reading newspapers in a back room," recalled Ms. Burch.
NEWS
May 11, 2000
GENERAL MOTORS apparently wants to keep Maryland officials in suspense. After last week's high-level meeting with company bigwigs, state officials still don't know whether the company's 65-year-old Broening Highway assembly plant will be open after September 2003. The future doesn't look rosy. The plant is producing GMC minivans that have not been redesigned in nearly 15 years and will be phased out in 2003. The company is ending the second shift on June 30, laying off about 1,200 workers.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
FREMONT, Calif. -- Back in the 1970s, the General Motors Corp. assembly plant here was no ordinary American factory. It was far worse.Managers viewed employees as ignorant inferiors, rebuffed suggestions as back talk and even denied simple favors, like the use of office bathrooms.The workers fought back -- skipping an average of one day of work a week, calling wildcat strikes and slapping together one of the worst-built cars on the market, the Oldsmobile Cutlass.Today, with most of the same workers, the Fremont auto plant is one of the most efficient and peaceful in America.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1998
General Motors Corp. plans to trim production at its Baltimore van assembly plant by 10 percent during the first quarter of 1999, a company spokesman said yesterday, affecting an undetermined number of workers.Beginning in mid-March, the plant will build 45 Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans per hour, down from the current production rate of 50 units per hour, according to Joseph Jacuzzi, a spokesman for GM's Truck Group in Pontiac, Mich. He attributed the slowdown to declining sales.Jacuzzi said it is too soon to say how many workers will be affected.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1999
Should General Motors Corp. decide that it wants to build a new factory in Baltimore, land won't be a problem.State economic development officials said yesterday that they have identified 200 acres contiguous to the Broening Highway van assembly plant that could be made available to the automaker if it decides to build a new factory here or expand the present one.Richard C. Mike Lewin, secretary of business and economic development, said the land availability is...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 1, 2000
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp., the world's largest automaker, said it will build a $558 million Cadillac assembly plant in Lansing, Mich., its first new U.S. factory in 14 years. The plant will produce annually more than 200,000 luxury vehicles, such as the Cadillac Catera, and employ 1,500 workers within three years. The move comes after a record sales year for automakers, with U.S. consumers buying 16.96 million cars and light trucks in 1999. The factory, scheduled to open next year, is designed to let GM switch to other models on short notice as consumer tastes change.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2001
Rick McKinnon scans the sprawling, well-lighted, spotlessly clean, brightly painted manufacturing plant featuring the latest robotic machinery and proudly proclaims, "We have a future here." McKinnon, 58, is the quick-to-smile, soft-spoken, gray-haired general director of the General Motors Corp. Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh, which will celebrate its grand opening tomorrow. The public is invited. McKinnon doesn't mention GM's other big factory in the region, the 66-year-old van assembly plant in Southeast Baltimore, but the contrast is obvious.
BUSINESS
By Christopher Boyce and Christopher Boyce,St. Louis Post-Dispatch | April 7, 2007
ST. LOUIS -- While much of the auto industry is fixated on who is visiting Chrysler Group's headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich., workers at its South Assembly plant in Fenton, Mo., are closely watching visitors in their own workplace. Trailers from Overland, Mo.-based Alberici Constructors, which is involved in retooling the South Assembly facility, are occupying part of the employees' parking lot. Workers are looking for any change in the pace of Alberici's work as they wonder whether Chrysler will follow through on a long-term plan to retool and modernize local operations.
NEWS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | February 15, 2007
Three years ago, people couldn't get a big enough SUV. The bigger the better. But by the time Chrysler Group came out last fall with its largest Chrysler sport utility vehicle ever, the eight-seater Aspen, gas prices had soared and the public's taste had downshifted to smaller vehicles that got more miles to the gallon. It was enough to give an auto manufacturer whiplash. Yesterday, Chrysler announced that it would lay off 13,000 employees - 16 percent of its work force - and idle the Newark, Del., assembly plant that produces the truck-based Aspen and its Dodge counterpart, the Durango, by 2009.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY AND HANAH CHO and ALLISON CONNOLLY AND HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTERS | April 5, 2006
More than 800 Baltimore-area General Motors workers received their buyout packets yesterday, giving them 45 days to decide whether to accept a severance package and leave the troubled automaker. Hourly workers at GM's Allison Transmission plant in Baltimore County and displaced workers from the now-shuttered Broening Highway van assembly plant in East Baltimore were invited to meetings yesterday. Company officials and a member of the United Auto Workers union explained the buyouts. In an attempt to dig itself out from financial troubles, the automaker said last month it would offer voluntary separation agreements or buyouts to its entire hourly work force of 113,000.
NEWS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
The closed General Motors van assembly plant in East Baltimore will be revived as a vast industrial park that will boost the port of Baltimore and employ at least 3,000 workers, injecting new life into the now moribund site. Duke Realty Corp., the Indianapolis-based industrial developer that bought the 184-acre site Jan. 26, plans more than a dozen warehouses for port-related business in addition to a possible office complex and manufacturing/research and development facility, a Duke official told The Sun yesterday.
NEWS
January 31, 2006
NATIONAL Bush to call for health reform President Bush's expected push for health reform in tonight's State of the Union address could face significant political obstacles, but the president is counting on the public's deepening frustration with rising medical costs to overcome resistance to the reform effort. pg 3a Senate to vote on Alito A last-minute attempt to block Samuel A. Alito Jr.'s nomination to the Supreme Court failed as a Democratic-led filibuster was defeated 72-25, paving the way for confirmation by the Senate.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Industrial developer Duke Realty Corp. has purchased General Motors' shuttered Baltimore van assembly plant and plans a $150 million project to demolish the 70-year-old factory and make way for an industrial park. Duke, an Indianapolis developer of industrial, office, retail and health care projects, disclosed it had bought a 184-acre Baltimore site in a news release about Mid-Atlantic acquisitions but did not identify it as the GM property. The statement, which focused on properties in Virginia, said only that the land could accommodate about 2.8 million square feet of new bulk warehouse development to serve port-related business.
NEWS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | February 15, 2007
Three years ago, people couldn't get a big enough SUV. The bigger the better. But by the time Chrysler Group came out last fall with its largest Chrysler sport utility vehicle ever, the eight-seater Aspen, gas prices had soared and the public's taste had downshifted to smaller vehicles that got more miles to the gallon. It was enough to give an auto manufacturer whiplash. Yesterday, Chrysler announced that it would lay off 13,000 employees - 16 percent of its work force - and idle the Newark, Del., assembly plant that produces the truck-based Aspen and its Dodge counterpart, the Durango, by 2009.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
More than 1,000 workers at the General Motors Corp.'s Baltimore van assembly plant will begin the new year on layoff, the company disclosed yesterday. Word of the shutdown came as several hundred plant workers participated in a ceremony marking the donation of six new vans to the Fire Department of New York City. They waved American flags and chanted "USA, USA" as the vans rolled off the assembly line with their horns blowing and lights flashing. The Baltimore plant is GM's sole manufacturer of the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans.
NEWS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | January 24, 2006
Ford Motor Co. said yesterday that it will cut up to 30,000 jobs over six years and close 14 manufacturing plants, marking the latest phase in what industry experts call a long-overdue effort by U.S. automakers to rethink time-worn strategies in the face of competition from more nimble foreign competitors. The sweeping cuts will save $6 billion in annual costs and hit plants in Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Georgia and Ontario, Canada. The moves will reduce the carmaker's production capacity by 26 percent and leave up to a quarter of its 122,000 employees in North America out of work.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it will lay off almost all of its 1,000 workers at an assembly plant in New Jersey early next year, news that comes on the heels of its announcement that it will close its van plant in Baltimore. The Linden, N.J., plant was the only one that produced the Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy, sport utility vehicles that GM introduced almost a decade ago and does not plan to continue making. Baltimore's Broening Highway factory makes the Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari vans, which date back 20 years and are also being phased out. The news reflects the continued pressure on U.S. carmakers to squeeze out efficiencies in an increasingly competitive market.
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