Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAssault Weapons
IN THE NEWS

Assault Weapons

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 11, 2011
The kind of tragic shooting of many people at once that happened in Arizona on Saturday is much less likely to happen in Maryland. In 1994, then-Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly banned semi-automatic assault pistols in our state and gun magazines that can hold more than 20 bullets at one time. The Arizona shooter used a gun magazine that held 30 bullets. Also in 1994, inspired by Maryland and other states, the United States Congress banned assault weapons and gun magazines that can hold more than 10 bullets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 2014
U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake's decision Tuesday upholding Maryland's ban on assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines almost certainly won't be the last word on the subject. The gun advocates who sued to overturn the ban won't be satisfied until they've heard from the Supreme Court, nor likely will their compatriots from four other states where courts have come to the same conclusion as Judge Blake. But her ruling provides a clear analysis of why the state's interest in banning these weapons outweighs the individuals' interest in owning them, even under the expansive view of the Second Amendment the Supreme Court embraced several years ago. No matter how often gun rights advocates like to quote the phrase "shall not be infringed" from the Second Amendment, even the current Supreme Court, which overturned a century of precedent in its determination that the amendment conveys an individual rather than a collective right, recognizes that it has limits.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erin Cox | December 19, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley took his call for a ban on assault weapons to national television Wednesday night, arguing on MSNBC's Hard Ball that "these combat weapons have no place in a civilized society. " O'Malley this week said his administration is crafting a package of state gun-control legislation likely to be introduced during the General Assembly session that begins next month. Wednesday night, O'Malley told MSNBC's Chris Matthews that political sentiment has shifted. "I think we've all been changed as a country," O'Malley said in a segment that included former Pennsylvania governor Ed Rendell, who also encouraged stricter gun laws in the wake of the Connecticut shooting that killed 27 people, 20 of them elementary school children.   
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A federal judge on Tuesday upheld Maryland's new ban on assault rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds, handing at least a temporary victory to state officials who say the measures could ward off mass shootings. A collection of gun owners, stores and industry groups had sued the state, saying the bans violated their Second Amendment right to bear arms. Judge Catherine C. Blake disagreed, writing flatly: "I find the law constitutional. " Blake's decision adds to a growing list of legal victories for states that have tightened their gun laws in recent years, even after the Supreme Court decided in 2008 that the Second Amendment guarantees an individual right to bear arms.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley predicted that Maryland will ban assault weapons during the General Assembly session that began Wednesday. "Their sole purpose is not for sport; it is to kill human beings - as quickly and as many as possible, as effectively as possible," O'Malley said, referring to guns like the semiautomatic Bushmaster rifle used last month in the shooting deaths of 20 Connecticut children. "I believe that we will, in fact, pass legislation that … restores the assault weapons ban," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Four weeks after Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun-control bill passed the Senate, a key House committee has yet to schedule a vote and continues to debate whether to scale it back. Among the possible changes still on the table: whether to take the AR-15 and a few other assault-style rifles off the list of guns whose sale would be banned. "We're still ruminating," said Del. Kathleen Dumais, vice chair of the House Judiciary Committee and a Democrat from Montgomery County. About a half-dozen lawmakers have been meeting once or twice a week behind closed doors to determine what changes -- if any -- they want to adopt to on a bill that would give Maryland some of the nation's strictest gun laws.
NEWS
January 28, 1991
Although Gov. William Donald Schaefer has proposed legislation that would ban the sale of new assault rifles and require people who already own assault weapons to register them, callers to The Evening Sun oppose the plan.Of 1,714 callers to SUNDIAL Friday, 1,264 (74 percent) said they did not support a ban on assault weapons, while 450 callers (26 percent) said they did. Of 1,718 respondents, 1,238 (72 percent) said they did not think people who already own assault weapons should be required to register such weapons, while 480 (28 percent)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
As Maryland lawmakers prepared to gather for their 2013 session, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that he believes the General Assembly is poised to pass a ban on assault weapons this year. Gun control is expected to be one of the leading issues facing legislators in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Connecticut last month. O'Malley said he will work with legislative leaders to craft a comprehensive package to address high-powered weapons, mental health and school security.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Police Chief Jim Johnson on Monday called on state and federal lawmakers to strengthen laws on background checks for gun buyers and stop the sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines in the wake of the Connecticut school mass shooting that left 28 dead. "This is not the time to be timid," Kamenetz said at a news conference, reading from an open letter he wrote to Maryland's state and federal elected officials. "We cannot sit by and do nothing.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
In 2002, John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo terrorized the Washington region for three weeks by firing bullets at innocent people in parking lots and at gas stations, ultimately killing 10 people and wounding three others. They used a Bushmaster XM-15 E2S rifle, one many variants of America's most popular assault weapon, the AR-15. In 2006, Kyle Aaron Huff used a Bushmaster when he opened fire at a post-rave party in Seattle, killing six before committing suicide. In 2007, Tyler Peterson used an AR-15 to kill six people at a homecoming party in Crandon, Wis. In 2012, a gunman opened fire at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., killing 12 people and injuring 58 others.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Lawyers for the state and gun rights advocates debated in federal court Tuesday about the government's power to hem in the Second Amendment to ward off mass shootings. Spectators crammed into a federal courtroom in downtown Baltimore to watch the hearing regarding bans on the sale or sharing of assault rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. Those provisions, which took effect in October, were among a package of measures enacted to strengthen Maryland's gun laws after 26 people were killed in an elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The founder of an embattled Sparks-based insurance company appears to have been plotting to kill a Delaware judge overseeing the liquidation of his business, recording himself on a trip to scout out his targets and acquiring a cache of weapons, federal authorities allege in court filings. Jeffrey B. Cohen, 39, of Reisterstown was arrested last month after he was indicted on charges that he schemed to make it appear that his company, Indemnity Insurance Corp., which insured bars and nightclubs, had millions of dollars in cash it did not possess.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Several hundred gun-rights advocates rallied in Annapolis Tuesday, saying they'll work to unseat state legislators who voted for Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun-control law in 2013. "The dragon that got awoken last year is still on patrol," said Shannon Alford, Maryland lobbyist for the National Rifle Association, to the more than 300 people gathered at Lawyer's Mall in freezing temperatures. It may have been a fraction of the crowd drawn to the State House complex last year as the legislature debated a ban on the sale of assault weapons, but advocates warned the activism ignited last year would continue, leading chants of "freedom" and the Second Amendment's final clause "shall not be infringed.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Perhaps the ultimate tribute to the strong and well considered gun control measures that go into effect in Maryland tomorrow is the tepid challenge gun rights advocates have made to them. Months after announcing that they would not seek to petition the law to referendum - a nod to the inevitable, given polls showing that 80 percent of Marylanders support the law's provisions - gun advocates filed a pair of lawsuits last week seeking to block implementation of two elements: a ban on assault weapons and high capacity magazines and a requirement that handgun purchasers obtain a license and provide their fingerprints to the Maryland State Police.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's political action committee sounded the call Friday for Congress to renew efforts to pass gun control. His O'Say Can You See political action committee urged supporters to sign on to O'Malley's petition to Congress. In a message to supporters, the governor wrote that "in the coming months, I'm going to continue to fight for those who stand with us on legislation to reduce gun violence. "  O'Malley spokeswoman Lis Smith said that meant "elected like-minded Democrats," a task to which O'Malley has devoted a travel-heavy itinerary this fall.  In the message to supporters, O'Malley praised Maryland's new law, set to take effect next week.  In the wake of last year's Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
May 15, 2013
Tomorrow, Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to sign into law the most comprehensive gun control legislation Maryland has seen in at least 25 years, a bill that will not only help guard against a mass shooting incident, like December's massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, but will also help fight the day-to-day violence that plagues Baltimore and other communities. The bill has become doubly important with the failure - at least for the moment - of attempts to tighten gun laws on the federal level, both because it will make Marylanders safer and because it can serve as a model for other states as they seek ways to address gun violence.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley and gun-control advocates launched an offensive Thursday to protect his proposed ban on assault-type weapons from a House committee's efforts to scale it back. "Military-style assault weapons belong on the battlefield, NOT on the streets of our cities and towns," said an email O'Malley's political action committee sent to gun-control supporters, urging them to lobby against efforts to exempt some guns used in recent mass shootings. "We need you to ACT NOW. " Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, flanked by police chiefs and state's attorneys, held a news conference Thursday morning calling for lawmakers to pass the "common-sense, balanced approach" that has already been approved by the state Senate.
NEWS
May 2, 2013
I grew up with guns in my house. There are guns in my house. I understand the sport of the shooting range and the sport of hunting. I understand the argument, while not finding it convincing, that guns in the home protect you. What I do not understand is any argument for assault weapons in private hands. Assault weapons were created to kill people - just as one did so effectively in the hands of a 20-year-old at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Now is the time to have a reasoned discussion of gun ownership and of gun control.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
I am ashamed to find out that the U.S. Senate has voted to oppose minimal, common-sense gun control legislation ("Defeat leaves gun control backers at a loss for strategy," April 19). Thankfully, both of our Maryland senators supported these measures, while 46 senators, including 90 percent of Republicans, opposed requiring criminal background checks on sales at gun shows and online. Even more elected officials opposed banning assault weapons or large-scale ammunition magazines.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.