Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAssault Pistols
IN THE NEWS

Assault Pistols

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 8, 1994
This is the week when the assault on assault pistols gets under way in the General Assembly. In both the House andSenate, committees are preparing to approve bills that would ban 18 such semi-automatic weapons in Maryland, along with a ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines with 20 or more cartridges. It's a minimal step for curbing handguns violence, but an important one.These destructive weapons are increasingly favored by criminals. There is little or no sporting or self-defense use. It makes sense to get these weapons off the streets and off the shelves of gun stores.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Several thousand Marylanders went to Annapolis to voice their opinions on gun control Wednesday as the General Assembly began considering Gov. Martin O'Malley's sweeping proposal to impose new limits on the purchase of firearms. At a hearing before a Senate committee, O'Malley urged state legislators to approve what he called a comprehensive approach to curbing gun violence. He called for a ban on the sale of "military-style" assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, and said the state should require licensing and training for handgun buyers.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 17, 1994
Remember these names: American Joe Miedusiewski, George Della, Vernon Boozer, Thomas Bromwell, Nancy Murphy and Michael Wagner.These are metro-area fence-sitters in the drive to ban 18 brands of semi-automatic pistols, known as assault weapons, from Maryland. Most of these state senators have made a commitment to groups trying to remove assault pistols from the streets but are now equivocating.We find it appalling that these senators actually believe assault pistols serve a legitimate sporting or self-defense purpose.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2004
Gun dealer Sanford Abrams says the expiration of a nationwide ban on assault weapons only means that a right that should have never been denied, to buy and collect those firearms, will be returned. Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, whose county saw the deadly effects of a military-style weapon in the hands of a sniper, is concerned. That the gun used to kill 10 Washington-area residents two years ago is not covered by the federal ban only shows that the law should be strengthened, not weakened, he says.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Scott Shane contributed to this article | March 14, 1994
To the patrons of Bob's Coins & Guns in Annapolis, banning the sale of so-called assault pistols would be like prohibiting the purchase of sports cars.George Councill, a regular customer, visited the shop last week and talked about his prized SP-89 semiautomatic pistol -- one of the 17 types the Maryland Senate will consider banning this week. Mr. Councill uses his for target practice and compares it to a high-performance coupe."It's fun," said Mr. Councill of the military-style weapon that allows him to spray beer cans with 15 bullets in as many seconds.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
The Maryland Senate easily approved a bill yesterday that would ban the sale of most assault pistols, ending years of frustration for gun control advocates who have seen such measures die in committee. The final vote was 29 to 18.The battle, however, is far from over. The bill now heads to the House of Delegates Judiciary Committee, where legislators are expected to begin discussion as early as tomorrow.Proponents claim enough support in the House committee for passage, but the chairman says the vote could go either way. It's "too close to call," said Judiciary Chairman Joseph F. Vallario Jr., a Prince George's Democrat.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
Responding to public outcry over handgun violence, the House of Delegates gave final legislative approval yesterday to a bill banning the sale of assault pistols -- virtually assuring that Maryland will become the fifth state to outlaw certain military-style weapons.Delegates voted 81-60 to pass the bill, giving Gov. William Donald Schaefer a long-sought victory in the waning days of his final legislative session. Mr. Schaefer, who has struggled for an assault weapons ban since 1991, plans to sign the bill into law in May."
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Staff Writer | January 25, 1993
Some visitors to a gun show see a Heckler & Koch SP-89 as an object to admire."A mechanical beauty," said Joe Brusio, part of the crowd that was sometimes looking, sometimes buying yesterday at the gun show in the Annapolis National Guard armory."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
As the governor gears up to propose more gun control for Maryland, the effect of the last such measure remains debatable.It has been almost 14 months since the state's ban on semiautomatic assault pistols took effect, but reviews are mixed.The ban's supporters point to a recent decrease in police seizures of the pistols as proof that the law is working, while opponents say the ban has not reduced crime.Baltimore police noticed an increase in their seizures of assault pistols last year -- even after the ban took effect June 1, 1994 -- but a significant decline in confiscations in 1995.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Without a vote to spare, gun control supporters in the Maryland legislature fought off the second serious attempt in nine days to kill a proposed ban on the sale of assault pistols.The House Judiciary Committee approved the bill yesterday, sending it into the final leg of its legislative journey -- a vote on the floor of the House of Delegates, where gun control advocates are predicting victory. The House is expected to begin debate on the bill tomorrow."Wow!" said Vincent DeMarco, executive director of Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse, when he learned the bill had barely cleared the committee.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2004
UPPER MARLBORO - Nathaniel Dixon had been thinking for a while about buying an assault rifle, but it was the ban being debated in the General Assembly that cemented the deal. He walked away from yesterday's gun show at the Showplace Arena here $1,100 poorer, but visibly pleased with his Olympic Arms .223-caliber semiautomatic, a formidable-looking weapon of military appearance that is nearly 3 feet long. He said he intends to use it to shoot turkeys. "That bill spurred me on to make my purchase," said Dixon, 52, as he waited for gun dealer Sanford M. Abrams to complete a federal "instant check" for a criminal record.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
As the governor gears up to propose more gun control for Maryland, the effect of the last such measure remains debatable.It has been almost 14 months since the state's ban on semiautomatic assault pistols took effect, but reviews are mixed.The ban's supporters point to a recent decrease in police seizures of the pistols as proof that the law is working, while opponents say the ban has not reduced crime.Baltimore police noticed an increase in their seizures of assault pistols last year -- even after the ban took effect June 1, 1994 -- but a significant decline in confiscations in 1995.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 20, 1994
In a season when the guns make everyone cringe -- a 61-year-old man fires into a crowd of kids throwing rocks at his car and kills a 13-year-old; a Baltimore County judge sanctifies an act of barbarism by reluctantly giving 18 months to a man who kills his wife -- these three women walked into Ellen Sauerbrey's campaign headquarters Tuesday and asked for a small gesture of sanity, which they were naturally denied."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
Responding to public outcry over handgun violence, the House of Delegates gave final legislative approval yesterday to a bill banning the sale of assault pistols -- virtually assuring that Maryland will become the fifth state to outlaw certain military-style weapons.Delegates voted 81-60 to pass the bill, giving Gov. William Donald Schaefer a long-sought victory in the waning days of his final legislative session. Mr. Schaefer, who has struggled for an assault weapons ban since 1991, plans to sign the bill into law in May."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Without a vote to spare, gun control supporters in the Maryland legislature fought off the second serious attempt in nine days to kill a proposed ban on the sale of assault pistols.The House Judiciary Committee approved the bill yesterday, sending it into the final leg of its legislative journey -- a vote on the floor of the House of Delegates, where gun control advocates are predicting victory. The House is expected to begin debate on the bill tomorrow."Wow!" said Vincent DeMarco, executive director of Marylanders Against Handgun Abuse, when he learned the bill had barely cleared the committee.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
The Maryland Senate easily approved a bill yesterday that would ban the sale of most assault pistols, ending years of frustration for gun control advocates who have seen such measures die in committee. The final vote was 29 to 18.The battle, however, is far from over. The bill now heads to the House of Delegates Judiciary Committee, where legislators are expected to begin discussion as early as tomorrow.Proponents claim enough support in the House committee for passage, but the chairman says the vote could go either way. It's "too close to call," said Judiciary Chairman Joseph F. Vallario Jr., a Prince George's Democrat.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
The best way to defeat gun control legislation in Annapolis is to elect more "sensible people," a state guns rights advocate said last night.Bob McMurray, vice president of the Maryland State Rifle and Pistol Association in Silver Spring, urged Carroll residents to work to throw gun control supporters out of office."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
It is one arms race that has never come to the negotiatin table -- the street-corner gun competition of drug dealers and stickup men. It is an arms race in which the only winner is the gun industry, and the biggest losers are innocent people caught in the cross-fire.A decade ago, the guns that most worried the public were Saturday Night Specials, a loose category of weapons distinguished by cheap construction and low price, which could put deadly force in the hands of any kid with $25 or $50 to spare.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
The best way to defeat gun control legislation in Annapolis is to elect more "sensible people," a state guns rights advocate said last night.Bob McMurray, vice president of the Maryland State Rifle and Pistol Association in Silver Spring, urged Carroll residents to work to throw gun control supporters out of office."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
In a break with its past, the Maryland Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a bill that would ban the sale of 18 types of assault pistols. The action came after gun control proponents fought back an amendment that could have killed the legislation.The Senate's decision marked a breakthrough for Gov. William Donald Schaefer and gun control proponents across Maryland, who have fought to bring some kind of assault weapons ban to a full vote of the Senate since 1991."This has been a long time coming," the governor said through his press secretary, Page W. Boinest.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.