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NEWS
September 11, 2013
The Obama administration has decided to strike at the Assad regime in Syria because of its alleged use of chemical weapons in a civil war that has already killed about 100,000 people and sent millions of refugees into Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq (" The decisive moment," Sept. 9). As yet unclear is when the attack will be launched or what form it will take. The administration has been talking about air strikes while Secretary of State John Kerry, waffle iron at the ready, has hinted at the use of ground forces.
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NEWS
March 30, 2014
Some of you tend to suffer MEGO ("my eyes glaze over") syndrome when the topic turns to foreign affairs. But you should do all you can to resist the temptation. The world remains too dangerous a place for America to divert its attention. Today, two significant foreign policy challenges confront us: one, Radical Islam and its many iterations; and two, a resurgent Russia led by our favorite former KGB agent, Vladimir Putin. I was reminded of the former during a recent trip to Europe.
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NEWS
September 19, 1993
Syrian President Hafez el Assad harbors Hezbollah in Lebanon, and such groups as the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine in Damascus. The dictator endorsed the PLO agreement with Israel, while hosting groups have sworn to destroy it. He has been negotiating with Israel since 1991 on an exchange of recognition for the return of the Golan Heights to Syria. Mr. Assad is a cautious despot. He is comfortable only with all options open.
NEWS
January 4, 2014
While reading the summary of key 2013 events, when I got to the description that "Syria blinked," I had to blink myself. I assume the writer meant "Syria winked. " At least that's about as much attention as Bashar al-Assad paid to President Barack Obama's red lines - or maybe they were dotted lines free to cross if you doubted any serious consequences. When mounting evidence no longer permitted President Obama to avoid some response, he deftly pirouetted to Congress, asking unnecessary permission to take action ("Atypical images of war," Jan. 2)
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | January 17, 1994
JERUSALEM -- If Israelis were waiting for President Hafez el Assad to spell out his vision of a peace plan, it was a short spelling lesson.Publicly the Syrian leader uttered the one word Israel was waiting for -- "normal" relations -- but declined to go further than that."
NEWS
By William Safire | July 19, 1991
Washington -- WHAT'S REALLY in that letter from Syria's dictator, Hafez al-Assad, to George Bush?News accounts say that Syria has unconditionally accepted our proposal to convene a Middle East conference. Only a silent U.N. observer would be permitted, goes the Bush compromise; and if face-to-face negotiations stall, no running to a plenary session of outside powers can happen without both parties' consent."Very positive," said President Bush of the letter; "a breakthrough." Secretary Baker called it "a positive response and it is not -- if you read the letter -- it is not conditioned."
NEWS
January 19, 1994
It appears that Syria is prepared to make peace, at its own pace, with Israel. If so, Israel would emerge largely at peace with the Arab world for the first time. President Clinton met President Hafez el Assad at Geneva Sunday to obtain a public endorsement of this in principle. It was obtained. His five-hour meeting with the dictator whom the State Department accuses of sponsoring terrorism was the price that Mr. Clinton paid. It was probably arranged when Secretary of State Warren Christopher called on Mr. Assad in December.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
Human rights organizations believe that some 70,000 innocent civilians have been killed by the government in Syria's civil war and a million more have fled their country as refugees. Another million internally displaced people are wandering around inside Syria seeking safety. Since World War II, after Hitler's evil attempt to annihilate an entire population, people have been asking why the world took so long to intervene. Yet today, while innocent people are being sent to their deaths in Syria, the world continues to hem and haw while it tip-toes around the politically correct policies of honoring Syria's national autonomy and respecting its "sovereignty.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 8, 1994
DAMASCUS, Syria -- Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher met for five hours yesterday with Syrian President Hafez el Assad, outlining new Israeli ideas for a peace settlement and urging the Syrian leader to help prevent skirmishes across the Israel-Lebanon border from torpedoing the delicate negotiations."
NEWS
By DOUG STRUCK | January 16, 1994
Hafez el Assad is the dictator's dictator: strong, long-lasting, and if not beloved, at least not reviled by his people.The leader of Syria, who will meet President Clinton in Geneva today, has been said to be comparable to Saddam Hussein, only smarter. There are many similarities, though the two autocrats -- are old and committed foes.The comparison is key to a question at the heart of today's Geneva summit: Is the United States making the same mistake by dealing with Mr. Assad that it made with Mr. Hussein?
NEWS
By Rebecca A. Adelman | January 2, 2014
In three weeks, representatives from the Assad regime and the opposition are scheduled to convene in Geneva to begin the process of negotiating peace in Syria's civil war - five months after the government's chemical weapons attacks killed more than 1,400 people. The atrocities were depicted in a series of casualty photographs and videos that circulated globally on news and social media, and they provoked the threat of military action against the Assad government by the United States.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
On the surface it sounds like a virtuous ideal: America, which has long stood against tyranny and injustice throughout the world, coming to the aid of the Syrian people in upholding the international ban on chemical weapons ( "A shaky but promising deal on Syria," Sept. 16). However, what is often overlooked is that the U.S. did not come on board until 1975, after it had already dropped sarin gas on a village in Vietnam, presumably eradicating some of the enemy as well as many innocent civilians.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 18, 2013
Chemical weapons are evil, but you could also say they're a curse. They have a talismanic power to bend and distort U.S. foreign policy. You can ask George W. Bush or Barack Obama. In 2003, then-Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz gave a lengthy interview to Vanity Fair that caused a huge uproar, largely because the magazine shamefully distorted what he was trying to say. Mr. Wolfowitz explained that within the Bush administration there were a lot of arguments for why we should invade Iraq.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
The Obama administration has decided to strike at the Assad regime in Syria because of its alleged use of chemical weapons in a civil war that has already killed about 100,000 people and sent millions of refugees into Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq (" The decisive moment," Sept. 9). As yet unclear is when the attack will be launched or what form it will take. The administration has been talking about air strikes while Secretary of State John Kerry, waffle iron at the ready, has hinted at the use of ground forces.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
President Obama is trying to drum up foreign support for a preemptive strike on Syria but he is not receiving much support worldwide ( "Obama says most G20 leaders agree Assad behind chemical attack," Sept. 6). What is noteworthy is that for two years the Obama administration has stood by and watched and done nothing while more than 100,000 Syrians were killed in a civil war. But now, just because chemical weapons have been used by someone, Mr. Obama feels that crossed his "red line," and all of a sudden he wants to punish the Assad regime.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | September 4, 2013
When U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addressed the reported chemical weapons attacks in Syria last week, it was like watching a bad Stanley Kubrick movie cross between "Dr. Strangelove" and "Spartacus. " As in, "I, Spartacus, would like to claim full responsibility for the battles and woes in everyone's backyard. " This self-sacrificial impetus to take on all the world's ills needs to stop, particularly when the crisis of conscience belongs in someone else's dacha. Syria isn't America's problem to fix -- it's Russia's.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 14, 1991
DAMASCUS, Syria -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III met for more than six hours last night with President Hafez el AssadTC in a post-gulf war bid to restart the Arab-Israeli peace process and bring more stability to this region.The two held talks with aides present for several hours before starting a one-on-one session with translators that went well into the night.Mr. Assad is known for lengthy lectures to foreign officials. But the duration of the Baker talks reflected a deepening relationship between the United States and Syria after the war and the secretary's evident determination to wring something tangible from his six-nation trip.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 2000
DAMASCUS, Syria -- Syria buried its longtime leader Hafez el Assad yesterday in an outpouring of national anguish and raucous rallying behind his son and heir, Bashar. The ceremony began well before dawn, as the mournful wail from muezzins echoed through the capital's still streets. It ended with shouts of praise and pain ricocheting against the rumble of cannons while mourners laid Assad to rest near the grave of his oldest son, Basil, beneath the vaulted ceiling of a family shrine in his native village, Qurdaha.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
More than 1,400 people dead, 400 of them children, from rocket attacks spreading a chemical agent, most likely sarin, on civilians living outside Damascus. Those gruesome deaths ought to be the focus of U.S. and world attention - people suffering, convulsing, vomiting, laboring to breathe their last as the muscles around their lungs are paralyzed. Surely, there was a time when a decisive U.S. military response to such outrageous behavior by Syrian dictator Bashar Assad would have been a foregone conclusion.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 30, 2013
"Oh, when will they ever learn? Oh, when will they ever learn?" -- Peter, Paul and Mary By the time you read this, U.S. missiles and bombs may be falling on Syria. Why? Syria hasn't attacked us. It does not pose a security threat to the United States. These were arguments made against the Bush administration's intervention in Iraq by some who now urge us to make war on Syria. Secretary of State John Kerry, who as a senator was for the funding of U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, before he was against it, says the United States is certain that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons on his own people, thus crossing a "red line" established by President Barack Obama.
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